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At my age, the hard part is getting to the gig. The playing is easy - 102-year-old Fred Staton, still getting paid gigs playing tenor sax

Author Topic: Post-War Country Blues Harmonica  (Read 4999 times)

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Offline Johnm

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Re: Post-War Country Blues Harmonica
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2013, 10:47:56 AM »
Hi all,
It's been a while since this thread was posted to, but I remembered a post-war harmonica player whose playing I particularly admire:  Robert Diggs, who has several cuts on "The George Mitchell Collection" on Fat Possum.  Robert Diggs had a big, beautiful, relaxed, open-sounding tone, a great sound on single lines and chords, and was a mighty fine singer, too.  If you've not heard his playing, he's worth seeking out.
All best,
Johnm

Offline oddenda

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Re: Post-War Country Blues Harmonica
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2013, 06:58:52 PM »
John -

         Once again the Piedmont contributions are ignored. The greatest from that region and one of the greatest harp players of all time aand of all regions was the legendary (in some corners of the world) Peg Leg Sam. Born Arthur Jackson in South Carolina, he was remembered by many, including Brownie McGhee, with awe. A true busker of the world, he was recorded by myself (one LP, "Medicine Show Man" - Trix 3302) and later by Kent Cooper for his Blue Labor label. He was a medicine show performer who also sang, danced, and told jokes - there is a film about him by Tom Davenport ("Born in Hard Luck") that can be seen on the 'net.

          I played a piece by Sam one day for Alan Lomax and his reaction was, "My God, he's better than Sonny Boy Terry!" Now, Lomax had recorded both John Lee Williamson, and Saunders Terrell, so that was an interesting conglomeration. Anyway, high praise indeed. It was Baby Tate who "got" me to Peg Leg Sam, and it was Sam who "got" me to Henry Johnson.

Peter B.

 


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