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Author Topic: Blues Forms and Vocal Phrasing  (Read 17072 times)

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Offline Harry

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Re: Blues Forms and Vocal Phrasing
« Reply #75 on: August 12, 2020, 06:37:24 PM »
Louisiana Blues Little Brother Montgomery




   I   |  IV  |  I  |  I
   IV |  iv   | I  |  I
   V  | V#/V |  I  |  V



Is this progression about right? I could use some help.
It seems like a regular 12 bar but with some uncommon changes.

Offline David Kaatz

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  • Posts: 323
Re: Blues Forms and Vocal Phrasing
« Reply #76 on: August 12, 2020, 10:14:54 PM »
Louisiana Blues Little Brother Montgomery




   I   |  IV  |  I  |  I
   IV |  iv   | I  |  I
   V  | V#/V |  I  |  V



Is this progression about right? I could use some help.
It seems like a regular 12 bar but with some uncommon changes.
That first IV chord is really hard to hear, I don't think I hear the F in the bass. To me it sounds like a Ab, possibly with a C in the bass, which would make it numerically a #V. I don't hear the 7th of that chord either. I think the iv chord is actually a #V diminished, because I really hear an emphasis on the Ab note. The last two measures sound like | I / V | I / V | to me.

Dave

Offline Thomas8

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  • oooh well well.
Re: Blues Forms and Vocal Phrasing
« Reply #77 on: August 13, 2020, 11:26:48 AM »
I hear it as

 I | V | I | I |
IV |#V/V| I  | I |
V  | II/V | I | V


Offline Pan

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  • Howdy!
Re: Blues Forms and Vocal Phrasing
« Reply #78 on: August 13, 2020, 03:56:35 PM »
My offer is a mix of the above (thanks for you guys doing the heavy lifting):

||: I  |  V7 | I | I7 |

| IV | bVI V7 | I | I |

| V7 | bVI V7 | I I7 IV IVm | I V7 : ||

The bVI, of course,  is enharmonically the same as the #V, but I think bVI - V is a more commonly used description for this kind of a chromatically descending progression.

Just my 2 cents

Cheers,

Pan

Offline blueshome

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  • Step on it!
Re: Blues Forms and Vocal Phrasing
« Reply #79 on: August 14, 2020, 04:03:31 AM »
The bVI/V move is common in earlier blues and in the playing of Charlie Jackson. Later the Black Ace and  Oscar Woods.

Offline Harry

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Re: Blues Forms and Vocal Phrasing
« Reply #80 on: August 14, 2020, 05:27:20 AM »
Thanks for the help. I think Pan has it most accurately but I think one could call the turnaround just simply I/V.
You won't encounter this kind of progression often but it works out beautifully.
The V chord in bar 2 mostly appears in a 8 bar blues structure of course. Kidman Blues (Big Maceo) has a V chord in bar 2 as well but it's a 12 bar form.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 07:14:22 AM by harry »

 


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