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A lot of people think Elmore James wrote this song. My vote goes to Robert Johnson because he recorded it when Elmore was 12 - Chris Smither introducing Dust My Broom

Author Topic: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics  (Read 2974 times)

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Offline uncle bud

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Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« on: July 11, 2012, 08:28:34 PM »
Will Batts recorded Country Woman in August 1933 for Vocalion, probably with Jack Kelly and Dan Sane on guitars. They were playing out of Spanish tuning, and discussion of the musical accompaniment can be found here.

I have some trouble spots in the lyrics. Line 3 of the first verse is not clear to me. The first option I include is from a transcription on the internet, though I am not sure I buy it. The 2nd option is my guess. Other spots in square brackets as well. Any help appreciated!

Country Woman Blues - Will Batts
Spanish tuning

I've got two women in the country, I've got two women stays in town (yeah, boy)
I've got two women in the country, I've got two women stays in town
Reason I can fiddle it so careful, 'cause nar' don't dog me around

Say, you may be brownskin woman, great God, your hair long as my arm (all right, sing it)
Say, you may be brownskin woman, great God, your hair long as my arm (yeah)
Can't do the bedspring poker, you sure done lost your home

(Well, play it, boy!)

[Know] the short-haired woman waitin' for to carry your troubles on
Make you think through the daytime, trouble you all night long (Why?)
She make you think you right, when you know darn well you wrong (yeah, boy)

I don't want no jealous-hearted women, great God, makin' up my bed
I don't want no jealous-hearted women, great God, makin' up my bed
Man, she put somethin' in your mattress, make you wish you was dead
« Last Edit: July 15, 2012, 09:22:27 AM by uncle bud »

Offline Rivers

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2012, 08:37:38 PM »
I think you have it right,

Reason I can fiddle it so careful, 'cause ne'er don't dog me 'round

Who knows what that means  :P

Plus I think he's phrasing the first & second lines of verse 1:

"I'm got two women in the country..", rather than "I've.."

Reminds me of Minnie's classic first line "Is anybody seen my pigmeat on the line...', messing with the verb tenses.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2012, 08:45:13 PM by Rivers »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2012, 10:20:47 PM »
Uncle bud, I think the phrase in 1.3 is, "Reason I consider it so careful".  The only reason I know that is because Frank Basile pointed it out to me--I wasn't hearing it either.  I think Frank Stokes used the line in one of his songs with fiddle.
All best,
Johnm

Online banjochris

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2012, 12:58:33 AM »
UB -- I'm hearing "fiddle" in 1.3 and "nar' none" for the other bit in brackets. I think he means he can get away with having four women because none of them bother him about it.
Chris

Offline Gumbo

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2012, 01:28:40 AM »
i'm hearing "fiddle it so careful cause now none dog me 'round"

Also in verse 1 I hear "I'm" in each instance rather than "I've" (EDIT as Rivers already pointed out)

v3 " 'nuther short haired"
« Last Edit: July 12, 2012, 01:30:02 AM by Gumbo »

Offline dj

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2012, 04:12:58 AM »
I'm with Chris on the last line of the first verse:

"Reason I can FIDDLE it so careful 'cause NE'ER NONE dog me around"

Also, I'd transcribe the first line of verse three as:

"KNOW THE short-haired woman waitin' for to carry your troubles on", with the phrase understood to be "You know the short-haired woman...", but the "you" left out in this case.   

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2012, 09:19:20 AM »
Sorry for the delay in responding, things have been kind of hectic. I got a chance to go back and listen some more with all the suggestions in mind. For the line in question, I am hearing

Reason I can FIDDLE it so careful 'cause NAR' DON'T dog me 'round

Or should that be NE'ER, as in neither? I am pretty sure I am hearing a D sound in DON'T rather than an N sound for NONE. I really hear the F sound in FIDDLE, and indeed the rest of the word as well.

Johnm mentioned Frank Stokes using this line somewhere and I was able to track it down after much listening to Papa Frank himself. Never a bad thing. The (very similar) line occurs in "Downtown Blues (Take 2)" and was transcribed in the Frank Stokes lyrics thread as "Reason, I can feel it so careful, 'cause nar' one don't thrown me down". I think Stokes is singing "FIDDLE IT" as well in his version. Worth noting he sings "DON'T throw me down".

The meaning Chris proposes sounds reasonable to me, though I guess we won't know for sure without seeing other examples of this expression/sentiment. I wonder though whether "fiddle it" -- if that is correct, as I think it is -- comes as well quite literally from the the fact that Batts was a fiddler, who of course played on a number of Stokes' recordings. It doesn't make sense chronologically, since as far as recording dates go, Stokes and Sane recorded Downtown Blues in February 1928 while Batts, Sane and Jacky Kelly (prob.) recorded Country Woman in August 1933. But there's nothing to say this verse doesn't pre-date both of those recordings and is just a verse that this gang of musicians would use, possibly originating with Batts. Pure speculation!

Edited to add: Forgot to deal with verse 3. I'm considering dj's suggestion that it begins "KNOW, the short-haired woman...". I'm still waffling, but it makes some sense. This verse also appears in a Frank Stokes song: Mistreatin' Blues. In that song, it sounds like it could be "ANOTHER short-haired woman" but Stokes regularly adds the syllable ah/a/uh in front of many words for rhythmic effect, and this could instead be a case of that habit. So the line there would be "AH KNOW THE short-haired woman waitin' to carry your troubles on." Dunno.

Also forgot to address the question of I've/I'm. I hear what you're saying, fellas, though I think it is more I'mve, or I'm've, but for simplicity's sake I am leaving it as I've. 
« Last Edit: July 15, 2012, 09:48:08 AM by uncle bud »

Offline Gumbo

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2012, 03:37:59 PM »
Reason I can FIDDLE it so careful 'cause NAR' DON'T dog me 'round

Or should that be NE'ER, as in neither? I am pretty sure I am hearing a D sound in DON'T rather than an N sound for NONE. I really hear the F sound in FIDDLE, and indeed the rest of the word as well.

Johnm mentioned Frank Stokes using this line somewhere and I was able to track it down after much listening to Papa Frank himself. Never a bad thing. The (very similar) line occurs in "Downtown Blues (Take 2)" and was transcribed in the Frank Stokes lyrics thread as "Reason, I can feel it so careful, 'cause nar' one don't thrown me down".

might nary be the intended word - would that have been a common usage? It means (or meant once upon a time) not any, never, as in nary a sound.

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2012, 06:49:41 AM »
Yup, that's why I've transcribed it as nar', as Chris suggested.

Offline Gumbo

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Re: Will Batts - Country Woman
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2012, 08:34:45 AM »
grand so  :)

Offline Suzy T

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Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2015, 06:58:19 PM »
I'm having a rough time making this out, any help much appreciated!  Here's what I have:
President Blues ? Jack Kelly & South Memphis Jug Band (Will Batts, fiddle)

I?m walking round in Memphis, I?m telling ?.. didn?t have a dime

Don?t people go to see Roosevelt, I would have gone up ?..?

He woke up one morning, ????????
He begin to thinking about his poor people, and he begin to feel sad

Fiddle

If I had four or five dollars, that would make everything all right
If I don?t see no dinner, I?ll see you for a kiss goodnight

I believe I believe, President he?s all right
I believe I believe, President he?s all right
He kept me from going, out there to have a big fight.

Offline bnemerov

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Re: Jack Kelly/ South Memphis Jug Band lyric - President Blues
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2015, 07:26:13 PM »
Hi Suzy,

...in Memphis, I'm tellin' my good gal didn't 've a dime
...see Roosevelt; I would have done a penitentiary crime.

He woke up one mornin'
He was feelin' mighty bad

best,
bruce

Offline Suzy T

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Re: Jack Kelly/ South Memphis Jug Band lyric - President Blues
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2015, 07:34:42 PM »
Holy crow.  That was fast!  Thanks you Bruce.

Offline Suzy T

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Jack Kelly/South Memphis Jug Band: You Done Done It
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2017, 09:20:23 AM »
Love the fiddle part on this! Would appreciate help with lyrics.



I had a little dog his name pour soul
?..But he Run to the door
He done done it, he done done it,
Now you High powered mama , daddy really got your water on

Now the cat told the water (otter?) swimming around
Thought he had?. but he ?..went down
He done done it, he done done it,
Now you High powered mama , daddy really got your water on

Now  ?.baby crossed the roof
Couldn?t do a thing but wiggle and (then?) shoot
She done done it, she done done it,
Now you High powered mama , daddy really got your water on

Now two little boys, lay in the bed
One turned over what d?you reckon he said
He done done it, (he) done done it,
Now you High powered mama , daddy really got your water on

I red
Good potatoes at the bottom of the till
He done done it,  done done it,
Now you High powered mama , daddy got your water on

Now, Two little boys, lay in the bed,
One turned over what d'you Reckon HE said
He done done it, he done done it,
Now you High powered mama , daddy got your water on

Now the 4 legged rooster told the 9 headed hen
Meet me down here cause you know we ain?t no kin
He done done it,  done done it,
Now you High powered mama , daddy got your water on

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly/South Memphis Jug Band: You Done Done It
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2017, 10:37:50 AM »
Hi Suzy,
Boy, a lot of that is tough to hear, but I think I have a couple of the verses:

   I had little dog, his name Poor Soul
   Tryin' to find a number, he run through the door

   Now the cat fell in the water, swimmin' around
   Thought he had his belly, but he gut went down 

   Now, I tossed my baby, 'cross the roof
   She couldn't do thing but wiggle, and "Shoot!"
   She done done it, etc.

   Now, it's two little boys, layin' in the bed
   One turned over, what you reckon he said?

   I raise potato, bottoms, raise 'em on the hill
   Yes, they're good potatoes at the bottom in the field

   Now, the bow-legged rooster told the knock-kneeded hen,
   "Meet me down the hill, 'cause you know we no kin."

Those first couple of verses, I feel like I have the sound right, but I'm not sure of the sense.

All best,
Johnm
   
« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 04:08:26 PM by Johnm »

Offline TenBrook

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Re: Jack Kelly/South Memphis Jug Band: You Done Done It
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2017, 10:49:42 AM »
John, I agree, the beginnings of most of those verses are near impossible to hear (I had given up on the first verse but now I can totally hear what you heard). It seems like you and Suzy have most of them worked out pretty good. For the potatoes verse though I think it goes:
   I raised potato, bottoms, raised 'em on the hill
   Yes, they good potatoes asked her put em in the till

At first that didn't make sense to me as I think of a till involving money but its definition is less specific and can refer to any container, box, etc. Also it makes the chorus 'She done, done it' make a little more sense.

I was also helped by Youtube allowing you to slow down a song, at half speed it was easier to make out the line.

« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 10:54:22 AM by TenBrook »

Offline Stuart

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Re: Jack Kelly/South Memphis Jug Band: You Done Done It
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2017, 12:39:04 PM »
A tough one, to be sure. I listened a few times and the only differences are that I think I hear "tossed" for "throwed."--"tossed my baby..."

And I hear an "a" before "thing." --"She couldn't do a thing..."

For "raised em" I hear "right up"

I agree with Lew re: "put em in the till"

My ears ain't what they used to be, not that they ever were, so I'll be interested in what the final consensus is regarding the lyrics.

I agree, Suzy, great fiddle. I'm sure  that whatever you settle on as the working version of the lyrics, you'll craft the song into a real showstopper.

Offline Suzy T

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Re: Jack Kelly/South Memphis Jug Band: You Done Done It
« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2017, 06:39:14 PM »
You guys are awesome!  I wasn't even thinking of working up this song to perform, it's to satisfy the voracious appetite of my local string band blues class for material they haven't heard before. It's so funny how many of those verses, or versions of them, crop up in so many other songs.

Offline Stuart

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Re: Jack Kelly/South Memphis Jug Band: You Done Done It
« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2017, 07:28:44 PM »
I wasn't even thinking of working up this song to perform,...

Famous last words--That's what they all say! But in all seriousness, glad to be of assistance, if only in a very minor way.

Offline Johnm

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Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2017, 03:09:23 PM »
Hi all,
Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band recorded "Believe I'll Go Back Home" at their first recording session, in New York City on August 1, 1933.  For the song, Kelly accompanies himself out of E position in standard tuning, which was fairly unusual for him, since he almost always played in Spanish tuning.  A second guitarist, described on the JSP set "Memphis Shakedown" as "probably Dan Sane" plays second guitar, contributing flat-picked bass runs, similarly out of E position in standard tuning, and Will Batts, on fiddle, and D.M. "Doctor" Higgs, on jug, round out the band.  The guitarists' approach to duet playing is something of a precursor to the approach taken several years later, on Little Buddy Doyle's records, with both guitars playing busily, pretty much right on top of each other.  Kelly really was an exciting singer.  Here is the group's performance:



INTRO SOLO

I believe, I believe, I believe I'll go back home
I believe, I believe, I believe that I'll go back home
I'm gon' acknowledge to my baby, that I have done her wrong

St. Louis is on a fire, Chicago is burning down
St. Louis is on a fire, Chicago is burning down
I'm sick and tired of my baby foolin' 'round

Babe, please forgive me, I know that I've done you wrong
Oh baby, please forgive me, I know that I've done you wrong
I'm gon' get down on my knees, I wants my little old baby back home

ENSEMBLE SOLO

It's the same old fireman, same old engineer
It's the same old fireman, same old engineer
And they took my baby, and left me standing here

All best,
Johnm

 

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2017, 11:23:19 AM »
Hi all,
I merged three earlier threads on songs performed by Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band into this new dedicated thread, so it instantaneously has over a thousand views--pretty cool!
All best,
Johnm

Offline Lastfirstface

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #21 on: April 28, 2017, 12:51:48 PM »
Will Batts is generally tuned low on these recordings, right? I remember reading that in a thread here, but I'm not sure which one. I was messing around with "Policy Rag" on my fiddle and it sounded like C position tuned down to about A.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #22 on: April 28, 2017, 03:22:03 PM »
Hi all,
For "Diamond Buyer Blues", recorded in Memphis on July 14, 1939, Jack Kelly works out of E position in standard tuning,  with a seconding flat-picking guitarist (who does not sound like Dan Sane) providing bass support while Will Batts fiddles.  Will Batts is recycling a lot of his favorite licks here.  "Manicure" seems like a good possibility for a word appearing only once in blues lyrics.  Here is the group's performance of "Diamond Buyer Blues":



FIDDLE INTRO

I will buy you a diamond, manicure your fingernails
I will buy you a diamond, baby, manicure your fingernails
Says, I will stand a trial, baby, lay out some time in the county jail

Somebody, somebody, been trimmin' off my horse's mane
Somebody, somebody, been trimmin' off my horse's mane
Well, that will be all right, baby, I'll see you just the same

I can tell when my woman's kidman come in town
I can tell when my woman's kidman, when he come in town
She will go get them soft-sleepin' teddies, and them good old soft-sleepin' gowns

FIDDLE

I had a dream last night, and it really was tight
I had a dream last night, and it really was tight
It seemed to me like, my baby, she ain't treatin' me right

All best,
Johnm
 

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2017, 04:25:11 PM »
Hi all,
Jack Kelly and the band recorded "World Wandering Blues" at their last session, the July 14, 1939 date in Memphis.  I don't know who his seconding guitarist was for the session, but they grooved especially intensely together, and from the sound of it, their intensity jacked Will Batts up, too.  They blow the lid off on the solo.  Jack Kelly works out of E position in standard tuning here, and the second guitarist flat picks out of G position in standard tuning.  There is wonderful singing from Jack Kelly, as per usual, and he always had interesting lyrics, too.  Here is the song:



FIDDLE INTRO

I am in this world, wanderin', wanderin' from town to town
I am in this world, wanderin' from town to town
Well, if I find my baby, I'm gonna run her just like she was a hound

Will, if you play the violin, I will do the howlin'
Will, if you play the violin, I will do the howlin'
Well, bein' late at night, these women will turn to prowlin'

I am a man, I says, of this kind
I am a man, I says, of this kind
Well, I get a long ways, just to try to make me a dime

SOLO

It's three o'clock in the mornin', by the clock hangin' up on the wall
Well, it's three o'clock in the mornin', by the clock hangin' up on the wall
My baby used to come home at midnight, now she don't come home at all

Edited 5/2 to pick up correction from frankie

All best,
Johnm


 
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 04:11:02 PM by Johnm »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2017, 10:19:39 AM »
Hi all,
Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band recorded "Flower Blues" at their last session, in Memphis on July 14, 1939.  Jack plays out of E position in standard tuning, the unidentified second guitarist flat picks out of G position in standard tuning, and Will Batts fiddles.  This blues has a notably tough sound.  I would love to have been there at this session and heard in person the two guitarists and the way they worked together.  it's worth noting, too, that the way these two guitarists worked together has gone completely unexamined and unplayed by present-day players, just as has the duet sound of Little Buddy Doyle's recordings gone unexamined and unplayed.  Here is "Flower Blues":



INTRO

I'd rather see the flowers, growing on top of my baby's grave
I'd rather see the flowers, growing on top of my baby's grave
Than to see some other man smilin', smilin' in my baby's face

Here I am, here I am, settin' right chere with folded arms
Here I am, here I am, settin' right chere with folded arms
Well, it seem like all good times, for me, in this old world have gone

My Mother's dead and gone to Glory, my Papa's done th'owed me 'way
My Mother's dead and gone to Glory, Papa, he's done th'owed me 'way
But to have a low-down dirty heart, baby, to mistreat me this-a-way

ENSEMBLE SOLO

And you take me back, baby, I'll tell you just what I'll do
And if you take me back, baby, I'll tell you what I'll do
I will work hard and I'll slave, baby, I'll bring that money back home to you

All best,
Johnm

 

« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 02:53:01 PM by Johnm »

Offline frankie

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #25 on: May 02, 2017, 02:54:50 PM »
Well, if you play the violin, I will do the howlin'
Well, if you play the violin, I will do the howlin'
Well, bein' late at night, these women will turn to prowlin'

I know Jack Kelly sings "well" a lot...  and I do mean a LOT.. but I always heard the first two lines as starting with "Will, if you play..." - basically shouting out to Will Batts

The ensemble sound on these recordings is one of my favorites ever...  and that Flower Blues...  gawdamighty!

Offline Suzy T

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #26 on: May 02, 2017, 03:18:59 PM »
So inspiring!  I think I'm about to embark on a Will Batts binge!

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #27 on: May 02, 2017, 04:09:58 PM »
Thanks for the lyrics catch, Frank.  It makes so much sense, and the sound is right, too.  I will make the fix.  I couldn't agree more about the ensemble sound, especially on the solos.  I love the way they're all just blasting, and on some of the solos Jack Kelly and the seconding guitarist are playing runs right in the same register--what a mash-up!  It's a treat.
All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 05:14:17 PM by Johnm »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2017, 05:20:37 PM »
Hi all,
Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band recorded "Cold Iron Bed" at their first session, on August 1, 1933 in New York City.  For the session, Jack, who accompanied himself out of Spanish tuning, was joined by Will Batts on fiddle, D.M. Higgs on jug and possibly Dan Sane on seconding guitar.  Whoever was playing the seconding guitar sounds to have been working out of A position in standard tuning.  This version of the band didn't have quite the intensity of ensemble sound as did the 1939 version of the band, but it still sounds pretty great.  Here is "Cold Iron Bed":



INTRO SOLO

Baby, take me up and lay me down in your cool iron bed
Baby, take me upstairs, lay me down in your cool iron bed
If I don't get no better, I want you to come and rub my head

You's a no-good weed, the cows is gon' mow you down (Spoken:  Yeah!)
Says, you's a no-good weed, the cows is gonna mow you down
And if I was a policeman, I would run you clean out of town

SOLO

Ever since, ever since, my poor Mother been dead (Spoken:  Yeah!)
Ever since, ever since, my poor Mother been dead
The rocks have been my pillow, and the cold ground have been my bed

Baby, I will make everything all right
Baby, I'll make everything all right
If I don't see you tomorrow, I'll see you tomorrow night

SOLO

All best,
Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #29 on: May 04, 2017, 02:45:17 PM »
Hi all,
Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band recorded "Red Ripe Tomatoes" at their first session, on August 1, 1933 in New York City.  Jack Kelly sang lead and played lead guitar out of E position in standard tuning, Will Batts fiddled, Dan Sane (possibly) played seconding guitar, flat-picked, out of G position in standard tuning and D. M. Higgs played jug.  Will Batts fiddling seemed like it had a bit more variety in these early cuts of the band, though at the same time, it was probably less intense and bluesy.  He sounds here more like he did on the cuts he backed Frank Stokes on, like "Shiny Town Blues".    Here is "Red Ripe Tomatoes":



FIDDLE SOLO

I've got a 32.20, shoot just like a .45
I've got a 32.20, shoot just like a .45
I can walk on old Green River levee, babe, I won't have to hide

Now, I ain't gon' sell it, too good to give away
I ain't gon' sell it, too good to give away
I'm gon' save it for me and my baby, I ain't sayin' 'til some rainy day

Now, red ripe tomatoes, don't forget your T-bone steak
Now, your red ripe tomato, don't forget your T-bone steak
Well, when you get ready, go to fishin', go over on that Horseshoe Lake

SOLO

Well, Mr. Charlie, you had better watch your men
Now, Mr. Charlie, you had better watch your men
They all going through the bushes, and they are going in

SOLO

All best,
Johnm

« Last Edit: May 04, 2017, 03:22:17 PM by Johnm »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #30 on: May 06, 2017, 04:58:14 PM »
Hi all,
For "Cheatin' Woman", recorded on August 1, 1933 in New York City, will Batts sang the vocal, and sat out the tune on violin, so you're instrumentally left with Jack Kelly playing lead guitar out of Spanish tuning, the unknown second guitarist working out of C position in standard tuning and D. M. Higgs playing the jug.  One sort of peculiarity of the band is that they quite often gave a number of tunes in their recorded repertoire the very same instrumental intro, and Will Batts did this to an unusual extent.  The solos in the middle of their songs are consistently more exciting and fresher sounding than the opening solos.  Perhaps they were inclined to play it a little safe on the intros to avoid screwing up the front ends of takes.  Here is "Cheatin' Woman":



INTRO SOLO

Did you ever wake up in the morning, with the blues all 'round your bed?
Did you ever wake up in the morning, with the blues all 'round your bed?  (Spoken:  Yeah, boy!)
Thought about your good friend, these are the words you said

"I believe to my soul, woman, Great God, something's going on wrong.
I believe to my soul, woman, Great God, something's going on wrong.
I couldn't rest last night.  I been worried all day long."

SOLO (Spoken during solo:  Play it, boy!)

You can always tell when your wife ain't treatin' you right
You can always tell when your wife ain't treatin' you right (Spoken:  Why?)
She mistreats you, talkin', with a fresh man ev'y night

When you come in, she have a towel tied on her head
When you come in, she have a towel tied on her head
"Husband, your stuff ain't done, I been layin' sick in the bed."

Then you send for the doctor, doctor walk through your door
Then you send for the doctor, doctor walk through your door
"Man, your wife ain't sick--she just don't want you no more."

All best,
Johnm




 
« Last Edit: July 13, 2018, 06:58:29 AM by Johnm »

Offline Drew.MS.Blues96

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #31 on: June 17, 2017, 07:22:19 AM »
Hi folks

That's R.F.C Blues


That R.F.C sure is not envied to many men
That R.F.C sure is not envied to many men
It caused me to walkin', down through the lowland.

And early one morning, I went out on my job
Early one morning, I went out on my job
Began to think the work had done got hard.

I worked so hard until I got tired
I worked so hard until I got tired
Then I went to town, to get my wife some lard.

I sat and I wondered, about R.F.C today
I sat and I wondered, about R.F.C today
Its driving many men, and they'll have to obey.

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #32 on: June 17, 2017, 08:58:17 AM »
Thanks, Drew.MS.Blues96, for posting the lyrics to Jack Kelly's "R.F.C. Blues".  Here is the song, for folks who may not have heard it before.



All best,
Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #33 on: July 11, 2018, 02:35:42 PM »
Hi all,
"Cadillac Baby" might more aptly be considered a Will Batts cut than one by Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band, for Will Batts sang lead on it.  The instrumentation on the track features two guitars, a lead part played out of E position in standard tuning, probably by Jack Kelly and a second guitar flat-picking out of G position in standard tuning.  The JSP set I have the track on identifies Dan Sane as the probable second guitarist, but the touch of the player really does not sound like Dan Sane.  Perhaps more likely, it is Will Batts playing the second guitar himself.  Whoever it is, the duo has a wonderful sound.  In any event, here is "Cadillac Baby":



INTRO SOLO

Ahhh, somebody learned my baby how to shift gear on a Cadillac 8
Ahhh, somebody learned my baby how to shift gear on a Cadillac 8
Every since that day, I can't keep my baby straight

Ahhh, I was warned, baby, I'm gon' let you have your way
Ahhh, I was warned, baby, I'm gon' let you have your way
'Cause every dog, he sure got to have his day

SOLO

Ahhh, I said, late one evenin', I looked over your keyhole door
Ahhh, I said, late one evenin', I looked through your keyhole door
Woman, you know you done me wrong, I ain't comin' back here no more

Ahhh, I turned right around, these are the words I said,
Ahhh, I turned right around, these are the words I said,
"Nobody don't have to tell me, 'cause I heard the springs cry on your bed."

All best,
Johnm



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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #34 on: July 12, 2018, 04:16:11 PM »
Hi all,
The subject of "High Behind Blues" is exactly what you might think it would be.  Jack Kelly, working out of Spanish tuning, is seconded by a guitarist flat-picking out of C position in standard tuning, with (most likely) Will Batts fiddling.  Here is "High Behind Blues":



FIDDLE INTRO

I've got a girl, she is made high behind
I've got a girl, she is made high behind
Every time I feel it, she will give me a dime

She turned right around, and she begin to grin
She turned right around, and she begin to grin
"I ain't had none of this, Lord, in God knows when."

Well, it's look-a-here, baby, what you gonna do?
Well, it's look here, baby, baby, what are you gonna do?
Now, you may be lovin', and you jumped up and through

SOLO

If I get hands off of you, baby, it will be too sad
If I get hands off of you, baby, it will be too sad
You splitting up our lovin', some stuff I really have had

All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 06:45:06 PM by Johnm »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band Lyrics
« Reply #35 on: July 17, 2018, 03:18:53 PM »
Hi all,
Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band recorded "Joe Louis Special" at a session in Memphis on July 14, 1939.  The band that day featured Jack Kelly singing and accompanying himself out of Spanish tuning with an unknown second guitarist working out of C position in standard tuning and probably Will Batts on fiddle.  I would say definitely Will Batts on fiddle, since he plays the same intro Will Batts played on almost all of the band's recorded repertoire.  Here is "Joe Louis Special":



FIDDLE INTRO

If you give Joe what he want, that will be a big mistake
If you give Joe what he wants, that will be a big mistake
And he will hit you so hard, 'til you will want to jump in the lake

Now, steak and gravy, that's his favorite dish
Well, steak and gravy, that is his favorite dish
Well, he'll draw back, make you want to jump in the lake

Now, Joe ain't too lean, and ain't too fat, that wicked left he got, says, John Henry will tell you that
Now, Joe ain't too lean, and he ain't too fat
Now, that wicked left he's got, John Henry will even tell you that

FIDDLE SOLO

Now, along come John Henry, hit you on the chin, but he won't need no tellin', when he meet Joe Louis again
Now, along come John Henry, and he hit Joe right on the chin
But, he really won't need no tellin', when he meets Joe Louis again

All best,
Johnm 

 


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