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Now some people don't understand. They think a blues player has to be worried, troubled to sing the blues. That's wrong. I'll put it this way; there's a doctor, he has medicine. He's never, sick, he ain't sick, but he has stuff for the sick people. So the blues player, he ain't worried and bothered, but he's got something for the worried people. Doctor . . . you can see his medicine, you can see his patient. Blues . . . you can't see the music you can't see the patient because it's soul. So I works on the soul, and the doctor works on the body - Roosevelt Sykes, spoken on Smithsonian/Folkways Classic Blues anthology

Author Topic: The Atlanta Bluesmen: Curley Weaver  (Read 775 times)

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Offline JasO

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The Atlanta Bluesmen: Curley Weaver
« on: December 15, 2010, 06:16:14 AM »
I've been working on assembling an in-depth look at the amazing blues scene in Atlanta, Georgia, from the 1910s through the 1950s, and have already posted my articles on Blind Willie McTell and Buddy Moss. I wanted to let you know the next chapter is online too, on Curley Weaver.

For the uninitiated, Curley Weaver was one of Atlanta?s most beloved bluesmen and, for decades, Blind Willie McTell?s close friend. He was an exceptionally skilled guitar soloist, with a slide and without, and recorded many records on his own and as a sideman to Blind Willie McTell, Fred McMullen, Buddy Moss, Ruth Willis, and others. He was also an essential part of two of the best string bands of prewar blues, the Georgia Cotton Pickers and Georgia Browns. In some regards, I like to think of him as the direct forerunner of Duane Allman.

Four of the original researchers from the 1950s and 1960s have allowed me to use their research and interview materials: Sam Charters, George Mitchell, David Evans, and Peter B. Lowry, so great care is being taken to ensure their accuracy.

The Curley Weaver article covers his life and recordings, including information from his daughter, Cora Mae Bryant, about his later years. Hope you like it!

http://jasobrecht.com/atlanta-blues-curley-weaver/
« Last Edit: December 15, 2010, 06:35:36 AM by JasO »

Offline Parlor Picker

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  • Posts: 1614
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Re: The Atlanta Bluesmen: Curley Weaver
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2010, 06:45:14 AM »
Thanks Jas. These articles are fascinating. I just need a day off work to spend time reading and re-reading them.
"I ain't good looking, teeth don't shine like pearls,
So glad good looks don't take you through this world."
Barbecue Bob

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