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I write differently from what I speak, I speak differently from what I think, I think differently from the way I ought to think, and so it all proceeds into deepest darkness - Franz Kafka

Author Topic: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.  (Read 4313 times)

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Offline slideaway

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2010, 09:20:26 PM »
ah yes i see cw soneking is definitely one to use  >:D
still doesnt change the fact, maybe just register blues and jazz ect. as world copywrited genre regional specific brand names and maybe get it over with? we'll have the 'sparkling music' moniker?  :P well thats my pot stirring for the day! dont worry we get it from our own compatriots too

all the more reason to sing the blues! viscous cycle - thats why i love the genre, no shortage of inspiration  :)

Offline Michael Cardenas

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2010, 04:16:00 PM »
Stoneking and Jeff Lang for that matter are two of the finest Blues acts the wonderful nation of Australia has to offer, fair dinkum.
LISTEN TO BLUES MUSIC

Offline slideaway

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2010, 06:14:51 PM »
ok i feel bad now, taking it out on the good people of weenie C... who never did nothin to deserve that bad mannered rant.. i blame the meds  :)  not to say that it doesnt happen and it isnt real..
apologies to all and norfolk slim
keep on rockin weenies

Offline Doc White

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2010, 08:18:26 PM »
As one who defended CW against vociferous criticism a couple of years back - all I can say is ...quality will always win out. Evidence of CW crossover appeal - he recently signed with Jack White's production company and has appeared on a Paul Mcartney tribute.
And then there is this review:

Friday, September 03, 2010 
 Americana UK - Live Review
 
 
 
C.W. Stoneking - The Borderline, London - 3rd August 2010

Review by Jonathan Aird

The unexpected pleasure of going to a gig you thought (for a long time) you couldn't make, and a gig that had been on my wish list for about 18months - Australia's C.W. Stoneking purveyor of the finest and purest hokum blues and jungle rhythms. But first, the supports. Stephen Smyth, another Australian, cut a messianic Jim Morrison figure with his biblical prophet's beard and moustaches. This was perfect for his roared blues over a raucous electric guitar and thunder crack foot stomping. He wasn't aping Morrison but he had that feel about him - wild powerful primal singing but fortunately without the drunken bozo aspects between songs. I was impressed; with a suitable band he would be devastating.

Second up was Nigel Burch on banjolele with violinist Dylan Bates, with a set of Bohemian music hall songs crossed with a ranting poet. The kind of thing that you either love or don't. Dylan Bates was an excellent improviser and had excellent little hippy dances.

C.W. Stoneking and his four piece band took the stage about 9:30. Stoneking resplendent in an all white outfit and a red bow tie, slicked back hair and bearing a tenor banjo and a metal bodied national guitar. I have strong feelings about the tenor banjo, but Stoneking more than any other performer is breaking these down.

There followed an authentic hokum jazz blues calypso experience. And not authentic in some overly precise and overly reverential way. Stoneking and his band play the music as if it's brand new, hot off the street. Of course they love this style of music - but not in the way that want to recreate it - this is a newly created music and therefore vibrant and powerful. Uplifting, amusing, unlikely and stomping the way it should be. And then there's Stoneking's voice - th e thickest mumbliest voice you are ever likely to encounter, as he regales us with unlikely tales of his adventures on the highs seas, or duets with himself. Add on top of this the stare - the disconnected 1,000 yard unblinking stare and the off mike mumbling as he manoeuvres himself through the instrumental breaks. It's magical.

A set almost an hour and half long, devoid of weak songs, and with some real standouts like Dodo Blues, The Love Me And Die and Don't Go Dancin' Down The Dark Town Strutters Ball. This last is introduced over eerie banjo before the band joins in with a strident New Orleans' jazz band funeral march. And although it's all wrapped up in pure hokum there's still the thrill of the melancholy menace in the opening chorus - "you gotta laugh, you gonna laugh real hard when she takes her love away / you gonna cry, take a look at yourself, there ain't nothin' you can say".

It's hard to believe that Dodo Blues isn't actually a cover with it's wonderful lilting lyric as sung (perhaps !) by the last ever Dodo bird - "Nothing, nothing can be right, when everything is wrong. Nothing can be wrong when I'm walking with my baby - I wish that I was". That Dodo sure has got the blues, but it's a pure sing-along joy.

And it was during one number, without the band, just Stoneking picking raw blues on the resonator guitar that it struck home that this was nearer to Robert Johnson than Eric Clapton has ever been - it's not just about technical mastery, it's about the feeling. And that's what C.W. Stoneking has, in bucket loads. 


Read more: http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendId=57462546&blogId=538805034#ixzz14qkYzP6q

Offline Norfolk Slim

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #19 on: November 10, 2010, 01:54:25 AM »
He's very good at what he does.  Im not entirely sure that a connection with Jack White is an accolade, but well done to him for getting on and making a decent living playing music he loves.

The review is interesting.  I had to smile at the rather crass Robert Johnson comparison given that (1) CW sounds nothing like Johnson in any way whatsoever; and (2) Clapton never got near Robert Johnson himself, even when using two guitars to do it! 

I shall just smugly enjoy knowing more about the genre than the journalist >:D

That said, when he strips the tunes down he does get a very swampy and authentic delta sound, and the writing is really spot on such that you'd be hard pushed to tell when the tunes were actually written. There are a couple of his tunes I'm seriously tempted to have a go at.

Offline blueshome

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #20 on: November 10, 2010, 02:01:20 AM »
OK Slim but not in a voice like a 3rd rate ventriloquist please...........
At least he's out there putting the music in front of people I suppose.

Offline Norfolk Slim

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #21 on: November 10, 2010, 02:05:15 AM »
Ooo now you've done it Phil! ;)

What struck me, actually, was that his natural speaking voice was very much like his performing voice, bar the accent.  But dont worry, I cant do that sort of voice even if I try.  I'd just have a coughing fit.

Offline Doc White

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #22 on: November 10, 2010, 03:40:41 AM »
On another point entirely. A friend of mine just bought CW's National Tricone. CW strings it 16 - 59, tuned to pitch with an action a slide player would be pleased to have. Says he needs it to be heard above the horn section, given he only plays through a mike. Hands like a gorilla to play that thing.

Offline Doc White

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Re: CW Stoneking- Bristol, Uk.
« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2010, 03:52:21 AM »
I don't think the reviewer was saying CW sounded like Robert Johnson only that he got closer (ie was more authentic sounding) than Eric Clapton. Fair call in my book.


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