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Author Topic: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics  (Read 8157 times)

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Online Johnm

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2009, 05:47:56 PM »
Hi all,
The Cedar Creek Sheik accompanied himself in G position in standard tuning for "She's Totin' Something Good", a raggy little chorus blues.  McCutcheon liked to sing many of the same verses over and over again, so a number of them here have appeared previously on other songs in his repertoire.  For that matter, he was not averse to using the same verse two or three times in the course of one song.  I like the way he alters the first line of his refrains to suit his opening lines in the different verses.  His kind of nutty good humor is very winning.

   Met my woman at the ice cream stand,
   She totin' somethin' up there in each hand
   REFRAIN: Yes, she totin' somethin' good, totin' somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   God put Adam in the garden with Eve
   "Use that stuff, you'll have to leave."
   REFRAIN: Adam want somethin' good, yeah, he want somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   I got married on a Saturday night,
   Monday night I had a fight
   REFRAIN: but I had somethin' good, I had somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   I've got a gal in Kalamazoo,
   She don't wear no, "Yes, she do!"
   REFRAIN: God, she totin' somethin' good, totin' somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   SOLO

   Met an old man, ninety-five years old
   Couldn't walk straight, not to save his soul
   REFRAIN: But he hunted somethin' good, he hunted somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   God put Adam in the garden with Eve
   "Use that stuff, you'll have to leave."
   REFRAIN: Adam want somethin' good, he want somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   Adam took a drink of old home brew, Eve [used to share], to buy you two
   REFRAIN: Let's get somethin' good, let's get somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   SPOKEN: Dogs fightin' 'bout it, cats fightin' 'bout it, men kill one another
   REFRAIN: 'Bout somethin' good, 'bout somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   I got married on Easter day, 'fore Thanksgivin' she was gone away
   REFRAIN: But she carried somethin' good, she carried somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   God put Adam in the garden with Eve
   "Use that stuff you'll have to leave."
   REFRAIN: Adam want somethin' good, Adam want somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

   SOLO

   I got a girl in Kalamazoo,
   She don't wear no, "Yes, she do!"
   REFRAIN: But she totin' somethin' good, tote somethin' good
   Beedle-um-bum, don't know what he is
   But I know it was good

All best,
Johnm
   

   

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #16 on: April 30, 2009, 11:24:53 AM »
I know what you mean, dj.  I recall the Ed Bell lyric in which he talked about John Henry Ford, and it being on a particularly whupped recording, "Rosca Mama Blues".  If nothing else, the Cedar Creek Sheik's use of the same name for Ford would seem to corroborate your hearing of "John Henry Ford" in the Ed Bell lyric.  As for it's significance or origin, I don't really have a clue.

Just came across another occurrence of "John Henry Ford", this one in Tampa Joe and Macon Ed's "Wringing That Thing", on the Peg Leg Howell and Eddie Anthony Vol 2 disc. The first line of the lyric is unclear to me but they sing:

I had a little woman, [yes I believe she rolled]??
Made more money than John Henry Ford

Offline Rivers

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #17 on: April 30, 2009, 05:05:20 PM »
I found this, it might indicate it was a common usage:

"Durin' war time I got 'scripted and they sent me to Detroit to work in John Henry Ford's shops. I was a moulder. I had to stay up there three long years, and Lawd! was I glad to get home."
Jim McDowell,
Tryon, North Carolina,
Adyleen G. Merrick, interviewer,
April 6-17, 1939.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/today/jul30.html
The fireman screams, and the engine just gleams

Offline FrontPage

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2009, 08:11:12 PM »
I have really been enjoying this thread - the lyrics are classic!
Re: "John Henry Ford" I think it likely that this is a lyrically convenient blending of the familiar "John Henry" (referring to a person's signature) and the well known name of Henry Ford.
Cheers,
FrontPage

Offline jdcrutch

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2010, 04:45:25 PM »
Hi Andrew,
I haven't heard any new evidence, but I am amazed that anyone could think McCutcheon was anything other than a white Southerner.  He doesn't sound black at all to me.  I considered mentioning this in the first post in the thread, but didn't, and I'm glad you brought it up.  I am as sure as I could be without seeing him that he was white.
All best,
Johnm

Hi Everybody.  I'm new here--stumbled across the site while googling for the Cedar Creek Sheik.  Bruce Bastin, in his book Red River Blues, says "For years, Cedar Creek Sheik was considered to have been black." (pg. 195)  But he offers no basis (as far as I can find on Google Books) for thinking that he wasn't.

I've been listening to him all afternoon, and I'm as sure as I can be that he's either black or a first-class mimic.  What may make him sound white to some people is that his accent isn't the usual Piedmont or Delta black accent.  By his accent, I'd say he's from the South Carolina Low Country.  My people are from there, and my grandmother's generation all spoke the white version of the same brogue.  It's unusual among Southern dialects in that, in its Eastern versions (close to the coast), the vowel in words like "I", "my", "time", etc., is pronounced sort of like "oi", instead of "aa".

In the Low Country, a porch is a "piazza".  McCutchen (that's how it seems to be spelled on the records) says "pie-azza", but I think he's fooling around, the way Fats Waller does in "Oh Susannah, dust off that old 'pie-anna'."

"Watch the Fords Go By" includes the line, "Now soon somewhere in Charleston," which fits with my interpretation.

His pronunciation of "God", "straight", "Ford", "hand", "eye", "in", "garden", "about" (sometimes), "got", "away", "go", "Tuesday", "Adam", "can't", "highway", "road", and lots of other words is very typical of the black speech of the Low Country.  So is the way he kind of slurs "r" and "w" at the beginning of words.  The song, "Mary Had a Little Lamb" is virtually in the Gullah language (e.g., "Mary haav a little lamb," instead of "Mary had a little lamb."), and there are a number of other Gullah-isms in some of the other songs (e.g., "Highway stop an de money all done . . . .").

So unless somebody has some pretty solid evidence that McCutchen was white, I'm about positive he was black.  (Now, plenty of white folks in and around Charleston in earlier days grew up speaking Gullah, so it's possible he was one of those; but I doubt any of them would have addressed Henry Ford as "Captain".)

Regarding "John Henry Ford", this is pure speculation, but I suspect it has to do with hero worship (at one point the Sheik sings about going down on his knees to ask Ford for a job).  John Henry, the Steel-Driving Man, had the status of a demigod in the old-time black culture.  He was probably linked to High John the Conqueror, a mythic African prince, and to the slave John who always tricks Old Master in countless traditional stories.  These mythic figures were often blended together in the collective mind.  (There are similar phenomena in ancient Greek and Roman religion.)  It's possible that Henry Ford, as a rich man of humble origin and a popular hero, had a similar status in that society, and that he got mixed into the complex of mythic John heroes.  If that speculation has any validity, it's further evidence that McCutchen was black.

Anyway, I hope this is interesting to some folks.  Thanks for this great site!

Best wishes,

Jim Crutchfield
A Southern sojourner in
Long Island City, NY

Online Johnm

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2010, 05:59:36 PM »
Hi Jim,
Welcome to Weenie Campbell, and thanks for your thoughts on the Cedar Creek Sheik.  I believe the line from "Watch the Fords Go By" is "Now, Sue's somewhere in Charleston 'bout to be convinced", rather than "soon".  The Sheik's songs contain a semi-static cast of characters, including Miss Etta Prince, whom the Sheik wishes he'd married and Sue, whom he regrets marrying, along with the guys at the store, Paul Clements, Jimmy and Arthur Lee.

I'm still in the camp of thinking the Sheik sounds altogether white.  His tone production sounds white, much more like such Old-Time singers of his era as the Bollick Bros., kind of high, light and mild, than any Black singer I can think of, apart from Josh White.  His guitar-playing doesn't share a sound, either with regard to time-keeping or forcefulness of touch, with his black neighbors who were recorded during that era.  His pronunciation sounds like an affectation, much like other white singers trying to sound black, like the Allen Bros. or Jack Gowdlock.  It's hard to imagine a black singer adopting his quirky persona, for that matter--his whole manner seems eccentricly white, unquestionably heavily influenced by and admiring of black musicians, but white.
All best,
Johnm       

Offline jdcrutch

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2010, 04:15:11 PM »
Hi Jim,
Welcome to Weenie Campbell, and thanks for your thoughts on the Cedar Creek Sheik.  I believe the line from "Watch the Fords Go By" is "Now, Sue's somewhere in Charleston 'bout to be convinced", rather than "soon".  The Sheik's songs contain a semi-static cast of characters, including Miss Etta Prince, whom the Sheik wishes he'd married and Sue, whom he regrets marrying, along with the guys at the store, Paul Clements, Jimmy and Arthur Lee.

Thanks, John.  After listening to "Oh! What a Pity", I see you're right about "Sue's somewhere in Charleston."  I do think Mr. Clements's name is Bob, though, not Paul.  South Carolina Low Country dialect again.  My father grew up in Orangeburg, about forty miles from Charleston, and his name is Robert--"rawbut", more or less, with the vowel that many Americans use when we say "Paul".  "Paul", on the other hand, is pronounced the way an upper-class Englishman might say it, kind of halfway between "pall" and "pole".

Quote
I'm still in the camp of thinking the Sheik sounds altogether white.  His tone production sounds white, much more like such Old-Time singers of his era as the Bollick Bros., kind of high, light and mild, than any Black singer I can think of, apart from Josh White.  His guitar-playing doesn't share a sound, either with regard to time-keeping or forcefulness of touch, with his black neighbors who were recorded during that era.  His pronunciation sounds like an affectation, much like other white singers trying to sound black, like the Allen Bros. or Jack Gowdlock.  It's hard to imagine a black singer adopting his quirky persona, for that matter--his whole manner seems eccentricly white, unquestionably heavily influenced by and admiring of black musicians, but white.

Well, these judgments are necessarily subjective, so unless somebody comes up with a photograph or a birth certificate, we're each most likely to trust our own ear.  I'm absolutely convinced that he's black, and is from the South Carolina Low Country.  According to the notes to "Blind Boy Fuller Vol. 2", "it appears" the Sheik was born in 1910 in Andrews, S. C., which is deep in the Low Country, near Georgetown.  Andrews's population today is over 60% black, so the odds probably favor his having been black as well.  He probably grew up speaking Gullah, as his English is full of Gullah-isms.  I don't know of any other blues musician of that time from the Low Country, so it's hard to say how his neighbors might have played the guitar.  (Rev. Gary Davis was a South Carolinian, but he was from Laurens in the Upcountry, so not a neighbor.  Same for Pink Anderson, also from Laurens.)

You can listen to some traditional singing (but not guitar playing) from the Georgia Sea Islands (a closely-related culture) at http://www.rhapsody.com/georgia-sea-island-singers/tracks.html.  It's a very different style, but the accents are similar.  The track "Pay Me" (recorded by the Weavers as "Pay Me My Money Down") has a spoken introduction that may give a better sense of the dialect.  

As for the persona, lots of black performers have adopted quirky personae.  Think of Screamin' Jay Hawkins, for one extreme example.  There's a long tradition of black artists performing comic and novelty songs, which the Sheik seems to fit into very well.  And maybe it wasn't an adopted persona--maybe he was just quirky.  Chuck Berry seems to have a similar Ford fixation.  In the chapter on blues nicknames in David Evans's Ramblin' On My Mind, Evans finds the Sheik's nickname to be consistent with two traditions, sexual nicknames and royal nicknames (including Kaiser Clifton, Rajah Evans, Prince Budda, and Sheik Johnson).

Anyway, hope this is interesting and not overkill.  Thanks again for the warm welcome!

Crutch
« Last Edit: January 21, 2010, 04:37:18 PM by jdcrutch »

Offline jdcrutch

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2010, 04:30:30 PM »
Here's my attempt at transcribing "Oh! What a Pity".  Anybody have a theory on what he's saying at the end of the third verse?  I just wrote phonetically what it sounds like to me.  In the fifth verse, "gimme_a" represents three syllables sung on two notes.

Notice the Gullah element in the first verse, "How fool I do when I married Sue."

Oh What a Pity
Cedar Creek Sheik (Philip McCutchen)

Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
How fool I do when I married Sue.

I got married on a Sunday night.
I got married on a Sunday night.
I got married on a Sunday night.
On Monday night I had a fight.

I went to Bob Newton and I buy me a goat.
I went to Bob Newton and I buy me a goat.
I went to Bob Newton and I buy me a goat.
Sue, you ain't nothing but a [? hai des ko:t].

Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
How fool I do when I married Sue.

Some prays to the altar and I pray in the road.
Some prays to the altar and I pray in the road.
Some prays to the altar and I pray in the road.
I ask God to gimme_a John Henry Ford

Sue in Charleston 'bout to be convinced.
Sue in Charleston 'bout to be convinced.
Sue in Charleston 'bout to be convinced.
Wish I could marry Miss Etta Prince.

Some pray to the altar and I pray at the gate.
Some pray to the altar and I pray at the gate.
Some pray to the altar and I pray at the gate.
I ask God to gimme one dem Ford V-8.

I'd drive it to Charlotte and Baltimore.
Drive it to Charlotte and Baltimore.
Drive it to Charlotte and Baltimore.
I'd park my Ford in Miss Etta front door.

I'm gon to set in the back of my car.
I'm gon to set in the back of my car.
I'm gon to set down in the back of my car.
I'll play a tune on the old guitar.

[? Play] Sue in Charleston getting 'long fine.
Sue in Charleston getting 'long fine.
Sue in Charleston getting 'long fine.
I wish to God Miss Marietta Prince was mine.

Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
Oh! What a pity, what a fool I am.
How fool I do when I married Sue.

Crutch

Online Johnm

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2010, 04:36:45 PM »
Hi Crutch,
Thanks very much for your follow-up post and for the transcription of "Oh, What A Pity".  For folks who have not heard the recording, it's a 16-bar song sung to the tune of "Careless Love".  I am away from my Cedar Creek Sheik recordings presently but will back to them on Saturday and will see if I can fill in any of the blanks.  As I recall, I was stumped by the tagline of the third verse as well, but with fresh ears, who knows?
All best,
Johnm

Offline jdcrutch

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More on the Cedar Creek Sheik
« Reply #24 on: January 22, 2010, 10:35:58 AM »
Hi folks.

I seem to be on a jag with the Cedar Creek Sheik.  I did some digging on Ancestry.com and Google and came up with the following.

1930 US Census record for Sampit District No. 2, Georgetown County, South Carolina, Sheet 8A, Lines 36 & 37:

Quote
36.  Mc Cutchen (Miss); Head of household; Rents home; no radio [crossed out]; family lives on a farm; female; negro; 50 years old; single; has not attended school since Sept. 1919; able to read and write; born in SC; parents born in SC; can speak English; occupation: laborer; industry: farm; actually at work on last working day.

37.  Mc Cutchen, Philip; son; male; negro; 20 years old; single; has not attended school since Sept. 1919; unable to read and write; born in SC; parents born in SC; can speak English; occupation: laborer; industry: farm; actually at work on last working day.

The census taker apparently went farm by farm, and there's a farm schedule referred to for each farm.  (The farm schedules apparently were not preserved.) The Mc Cutchens appear to have been tenants on the farm of David J. Hardee (Line 28, Farm Schedule 96), a white man, who lived with his wife Bulah [sic, ? should be Beulah] and his father James.  Two other families of black tenants also lived on the same farm.  "Ford V-8" contains the lines,

   Dave Hardee and [?Boujie] settin' on a log
   Hands on the trigger, eye on a hog.
   
The name that sounds like "Boujie" on the record could possibly be a nickname for Dave Hardee's wife Bulah, I guess.
   
In the same census I also found a Rosa McCutchen, negro, aged 24, working as a live-in cook in the home of a white family (John B. & Clara Grant) in the nearby town of Andrews.  I haven't found any other McCutchens in the area, so it seems likely that she was a relative, possibly the sister of Philip.

Now here's something I was excited to find:

1910 US Census record for Hope Township, Williamsburg County (next door to Georgetown County), South Carolina, Sheet 3B, Line 68:

Quote
68.  Clemmons, Robt. B.; son of householder [Samuel P. Clemmons]; male; white; 18 years old; single; born in SC; parents born in SC; speaks English; occupation: salesman; industry: dry goods store; wage earner [i.e., employee]; working as of date of survey; no weeks out of work in 1900; able to read; able to write.

1930 US Census Population Schedule for Township 6, Andrews, Georgetown County, South Carolina, Sheet 13A, line 33:

Quote
33.  Clemons [sic], Robert B.; Householder; owns home; male; white; 38 years old; married; 20 y.o. at first marriage; has not attended school since Sept. 1919; able to read and write; born in SC; parents born in SC; speaks English; occupation: merchant; industry: grocery store; owner; actually at work on last working day; not a veteran.

Haven't tracked down Jimmy, although there is a Jimmy Clemmons to be found in the Andrews phone book as late as 2002 (and maybe still--I didn't think I should call him up).  There are a couple of Arthur Lees in the neighborhood who are about the right age, but nobody I can identify with any confidence.

Crutch
« Last Edit: January 22, 2010, 11:55:23 AM by jdcrutch »

Online Johnm

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2010, 10:46:00 AM »
That's really amazing work, Crutch!  If in fact the Philip McCutchen you've found is the Cedar Creek Sheik, you've figured out something I don't believe any blues researcher prior to you has ever established.  Congratulations!  The guy you found has the right name, was in the right place, and was the right age.  Your findings corroborate your sense of the Sheik's race, too.  It looks like I had that wrong.  That is outstanding work on your part.
All best,
Johnm

Offline jdcrutch

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2010, 11:22:28 AM »
That's really amazing work, Crutch!  If in fact the Philip McCutchen you've found is the Cedar Creek Sheik, you've figured out something I don't believe any blues researcher prior to you has ever established.  Congratulations!  The guy you found has the right name, was in the right place, and was the right age.  Your findings corroborate your sense of the Sheik's race, too.  It looks like I had that wrong.  That is outstanding work on your part.
All best,
Johnm

Thanks.  Amazing what you can accomplish when you're obsessed and out of work. ;0)

Offline jdcrutch

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Jimmy Shut His Store Door
« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2010, 11:49:09 AM »
Revised 13 Feb 2010:  Identified "Jimmy" as James Blakely, born about 1892.

This isn't much different from JohnM's version, but I've put it into four-line verses, just for convention's sake, and made a few changes based on my research into McCutchen's biography, and to reflect McCutchen's dialect and occasional use of Gullah elements.  I'm sorry to have to eliminate "I went and kissed Clarence' old grey mule," but it really is "ketch" (= catch, caught), not "kissed".  It seems pretty clear to me that McCutchen is saying "shot" where I (and JohnM) have "shut", but I don't know whether that's just pronunciation or actually a different word (in other words, whether McCutchen's dialect uses "shot" as the past tense of "shut", or just pronounces "shut" as "shot" no matter which tense it is), so I've left it "shut".

Quote
Jimmy Shut His Store Door
     Cedar Creek Sheik (Philip McCutchen)

1.  I used to work on a highway road,
Spend my money with Jimmy
Highway stop and the money all done,
Now Jimmy don't wants to see me

REFRAIN:  

   Lord, Jimmy shut his store door
  "How you know it?", 'cause he told me so
   Yeah, he wouldn't credit me, he wouldn't credit you
   How in the world Cedar Creek guine do?
   Jimmy shut his store door
   Then he told me so
   Caused me to wander to Nashville, Tennessee

2.  When I was broke and didn't had a dime,
The women wouldn't call me "honey"
All they women tryin' to eat me up,
Since they get my boneless money

REFRAIN:  

   Now, Jimmy shut his store door
  "How you know it?", 'cause he told me so
   Yeah, he wouldn't credit me, he wouldn't credit you
   How in the world Cedar Creek guine do?
   Jimmy shut his store door then he told me so
   I have to travel to Nashville, Tennessee

3.  I aks Jimmy just to credit me,
Look like he wanted to fight me
I went and ketch Clarence' old grey mule,
And the darned old grey mule bite me

REFRAIN:  

   Lord, Jimmy shut his store door
  "How you know it?", 'cause he told me so
   Yeah, he wouldn't credit me, he wouldn't credit you
   How in the world Cedar Creek guine do?
   Jimmy shut his store door
   Then he told me so
   I have to wander to Nashville, Tennessee

4.  The boys hangin' around Jimmy Blakely store,
They mouth ain't nothin' but a blabber
   (SPOKEN: Where you went to?)
I went to Dave Hardee back door
And I begged for a bowl of clabber

   REFRAIN:

   'Cause Jimmy shut his store door
  "How you know it?", 'cause he told me so
   Yeah, he wouldn't credit me, he wouldn't credit you
   How in the world Cedar Creek guine do?
   Jimmy shut his store door
   Then he told me so
   I have to travel to Nashville, Tennessee

5.  When I was broke and down and out,
The women didn't want me around
   (SPOKEN: No they didn't)
Since I got my boneless money,
Says, "Daddy, you must come around."

REFRAIN:

  'Cause Jimmy shut his store door
  "How you know it?", 'cause he told me so
   Yeah, he wouldn't credit me, he wouldn't credit you
   How in the world Cedar Creek guine do?
   Jimmy shut his store door
   Then he told me so
   I have to wander to Nashville, Tennessee

6.  When I used to work on the highway road,
Spend my money with Jimmy
Now the highway stop and the money all done
And Jimmy don't want to see me

   REFRAIN:  

   Lord, Jimmy shut his store door
  "How you know it?", 'cause he told me so
   Yeah, he wouldn't credit me, he wouldn't credit you
   How in the world Cedar Creek guine do?
   Jimmy shut his store door
   Then he told me so
   I have to wander to Nashville, Tennessee

  
NOTES:

1.2  James Blakely, born about 1892, retail grocery merchant of Andrews, S. C.
2.4  I.e., bonus
4.3  David J. Hardee, 1886-1969, the farmer on whose land McCutchen and his mother were tenants in 1930.

« Last Edit: February 13, 2010, 09:18:38 AM by jdcrutch »

Offline jdcrutch

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I Found Jimmy!
« Reply #28 on: February 13, 2010, 09:37:49 AM »
In his liner notes to "Never Let the Same Bee Sting You Twice", Chris Smith mentions "store operator Jimmy Blakeley, ordered by Bob Clements to deny credit to his customers."  I had already identified "Bob Clements" as Robert Clemmons, but I couldn't figure out where Smith was getting Jimmy's last name.  Then I listened to the song again, and realized that what JohnM and I were hearing as "Jimmy's liquor store" was actually "Jimmy Blakely store".  Of course that makes sense, because the store sells hash and bread, not liquor.  (The "bottle of dope" referred to in "Don't Credit My Stuff" is Coca-Cola, which a lot of Southern people used to call "dope".)  The name in and around Andrews, S. C., where the Sheik lived, is spelt "Blakely", and there's a village of Blakely, with a Blakely Road, about five miles from Andrews.

So I did some digging on Ancestry.com and found a 1920 census record that gives us the following:

Quote
Blakely, James / Boarder / Male / White / 28 / Single / Born in S. C. / Parents born in S. C. / Able to speak English / Merchant / Retail Grocery / [either worker ("w") or on own account ("oa")--the handwriting is unclear]

If Jimmy was working on his own account, that would make him part-owner of the store with Bob Clemmons.

Still no luck finding Arthur Lee (which are probably his first and middle names:  "Take care of my stuff, Arthur Lee!"), or Sue.  As for the amiable Miss Etta Prince, there was a large family of Princes on County Line Road in Williamsburg County, including an Etta Prince, but she was only about eight in 1930, and fourteen when the Sheik recorded in 1936, whereas he was about twenty-six.  You don't like to think about it, but plenty of country girls married at thirteen or fourteen in those days.  Loretta Lynn for example.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2010, 10:05:57 AM by jdcrutch »

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Re: Cedar Creek Sheik Lyrics
« Reply #29 on: February 14, 2010, 12:59:27 PM »
Great work, once again, crutch, in tracking down Jimmy Blakely.  Well done!
All best,
Johnm