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Author Topic: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions  (Read 65570 times)

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Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #210 on: January 24, 2009, 02:34:17 AM »
Added Today: (notes by Uncle Bud)

Crazy Blues: The Best of Mamie Smith - Often cited as the gal who started it all, with the smash hit "Crazy Blues", but also viewed somewhat critically as not exactly a blues singer. I think her singing is quite good, and while not Bessie Smith bluesy, it is more blues-inflected than some commentators allow in their dismissals. In her upper range, and clarity of tone and pitch, she sometimes reminds me of Georgia White. Some fun material, IMHO. Victoria Spivey thought so too.

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #211 on: January 26, 2009, 05:01:14 AM »
Added Recently:

Jazz Gillum Volumes 2 and 4

The Earliest Black String Bands Volume 1



Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #212 on: January 28, 2009, 07:13:59 AM »
Added Today: (Notes by DJ)

Boogie Woogie & Barrelhouse Piano Volume 1 - Pine Top Smith is without a doubt the best-known performer here.  Born in Alabama, he was based in Pittsburgh from about the age of 16, then moved to Chicago when he started recording in 1928.  He was killed by a stray bullet while playing in a dance hall in March of 1929.  Pine Top Smith's influential "Pine Top Blues" and "Pine Top's Boogie Woogie" are here, along with six other songs that hark back to Smith's years on the black vaudeville circuit.  That may be Mayo Williams doing the spoken parts.  Jabo Williams was from Birmingham Alabama, and shares some repertoire - "House Lady Blues" and "Fat Mama Blues" - with Walter Roland, who was also from Birmingham.  He apparently also spent some time on Biddle Street in East St. Louis.  Nothing is known about Freddie "Redd" Nicholson.  He's accompanied by Charles Avery, another biographical mystery, on all tracks except "Tee Roller's Rub", where J.H. Shayne occupies the piano stool.

Bill Gaither Volume 2 - Bill Gaither on vocals and guitar.  Honey Hill on piano on all tracks, with an unknown string bass player on a few songs.

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #213 on: January 28, 2009, 08:04:30 PM »
Added Today: (Notes by DJ)

Butterbeans And Susie Volume 1:  A couple of vaudeville singers, dancers, and comedians.  They met in 1912 and were married on stage shortly after that.  While the songs on this disc are mostly comedy duets from their vaudeville act, both Butter and Sue had great voices, as you can hear when they're given the chance to cut loose.  They're accompanied on piano by Clarence Williams on some songs, Eddie Heywood on others.  King Oliver makes an appearance on cornet on two songs.  Blind Willie McTell fans should note that Butter and Sue's version of "A To Z Blues" is here.

Lee Brown:  A singer with a high nasal tenor voice reminiscent of J. B. Lenoir, and a  decent pianist, nothing much is known about Brown.  He may have come from western Tennessee, based on the fact that he accompanied Sleepy John Estes and Charlie Pickett on a session, and that he mentions Ripley in a song.  Brown was fortunate to record in a lot of different musical settings - solo, piano/guitar duet (with Sleepy John Estes on guitar), in a small jazz band led by Sammy Price (Sam Price's Fly Cats), in a blues band with Rhythm Willie on harmonica and Bill Gaither on guitar, and with a few other configurations to boot.

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #214 on: January 29, 2009, 03:00:32 PM »
Added Today:

Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe Volume 2 (DOCD-5029) and Vol 4 (DOCD-5031)

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #215 on: January 30, 2009, 08:12:18 AM »
Added Today: (Notes by DJ)

Texas Alexander Volume 1 - From 1927 and 1928.  Lonnie Johnson on guitar where only one is present, or Johnson and Eddie Lang when there are 2 guitars.  Eddie Heywood on piano where present.

Texas Alexander Volume 2 - From 1928, two songs accompanied by Lonnie johnson, two accompanied by Eddie Land, and two with King Oliver on cornet, Clarence Williams on piano, and Lang on guitar.  From 1929, a session accompanied by Little Hat Jones and one accompanied by Carl Davis.  From 1930, the first part of a session accompanied by the Mississippi Sheiks.

Texas Alexander Volume 3 - The rest of the Mississippi sheiks session, then, all from 1934, a session accompanied by his Sax Black Tams (unknown clarinet/alto sax, piano and guitar), and one with Willie reed, Carl Davis, and an unknown string bass.  Finally his 1950 session with Benton's Busy Bees (Buster Pickens, piano and Leon Benton, guitar).

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #216 on: January 31, 2009, 07:36:15 PM »
Added Today: (notes by DJ, with discussion links below)

Blue Girls Volume 3
Anna Lee Chisholm (1924), with J. H. Shayne on piano ald Louis Lasky on guitar
Cora Perkins (1926), with probably Lonnie Johnson on violin, James Johnson or DeLouise Searcy on piano, and an unknown mandolin on one track
Virginia Childs (1926), with members of the Skillet Lickers backing
Eva Parker (1926, 1928), probably Eva on guitar, unknowns otherwise, and the Pace Jubilee Singers on the 1928 songs
Lulu Jackson (1928), accompanying herself on guitar, with unknown piano where present
Ruby Smith (1938), accompanied by an unknown piano

Male Blues Of The Twenties Volume 1 (most of the artists on this disc are accompanied by "unknown")
John P.Vigal (1922)
Reese Du Pree (1923, 1924)
Billy Higgins (1925)
Blind Richard Yates (1927)
Happy Holmes (1927)
James Crawford (1928)
Sloppy Henry (1929)
Oliver Cobb (1929, 1930)
Willie Dukes (1930)
 
Male Blues Of The Twenties Volume 2
(artists accompanied by a variety of pianists and banjoists)
Jesse Crump (1923)
J. Churchill (1923)
Charles Anderson (1924)
Tom Delaney (1925)
Mike Jackson (1926)
"New Orleans" Willie Jackson (1926, 1928)

Discussion Links:
Blue Girls Volume 3

Male Blues of the Twenties

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #217 on: February 08, 2009, 08:01:32 PM »
Added Today: (Notes by DJ)

Walter Roland Volume 2:  Recorded in 1934 and 1935.  Roland on piano and vocals, Josh White on guitar when present, Lucille Bogan doing the female speech when present.

Charley Jordan Volume 2:  All tracks from 1934.  Jordan on vocals and guitar with Peetie Wheatstraw on piano.  Two tracks with a small band with probably Arnett Nelson on clarinet, Bill Lowry on violin , wheatstraw on piano, and unknowns on sax and drums.  Also included are 6 tracks by "Hi" Henry Brown, with brown on vocals and guitar  backed by Jordan on guitar.

The Sparks Brothers:  Two St. Louis musicians who recorded from 1932 to 1935.  Marion (Milton, Lindberg) Sparks was a vocalist and his brother Aaron (Pinetop) played piano and sang.  On the Pinetop and Lindberg and Sparks Brothers tracks, Milton is singing accompanied by Aaron.  The tracks credited to Flyin' Lindberg have Milton singing accompanied by an unknown clarinet and guitar with probably Bill Lowry on violin and Peetie Wheatstraw on Piano.  The Pinetop sides are Aaron on piano and vocal accompanied by Henry Townsend on guitar.  And the Milton Sparks songs are Milton singing with Walter Davis on two tracks, Aaron on the other two, and Henry Townsend on guitar.  Also included are Aaron accompanying female singers Elizabeth Washington, Tecumseh McDowell, and Doratha Trowbridge.

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #218 on: February 15, 2009, 09:05:38 PM »
Added Today: (Notes by DJ)

Kokomo Arnold - Kokomo Arnold Volume 2:  1935 and 1936 sessions, almost all with just Arnold and his guitar, but two songs where Arnold accompanies Roosevelt Sykes.

Peetie Wheatstraw - Peetie Wheatstraw Volume 5:  From 1937 - 38.  Peetie Wheatstraw on vocals and piano with guitar accompaniment.  Kokomo Armold, Lonnie Johnson, possibly Charlie Jordan, and the ubiquitous Unknown split the guitar duties.

Monkey Joe Coleman - Monkey Joe Volume 2:  Two 1939 sessions by "Monkey Joe And His Music Grinders".  The first session features Buster Bennett on sax, Blind John Davis on piano, Willie Bee James on guitar and an unknown drummer with Coleman on vocals.  A later session from the same year has Coleman on piano and vocals  with Bennett again on sax, Big Bill Broonzy on guitar and Alfred Elkins doing the vocal bass lines.   Also featured on the disc are the complete recordings of Jackson Mississippi native Roosevelt Scott.  He first recorded on the same day as Monkey Joe's second 1939 session, using Coleman and his band as backup.  Scott got one more recording session, in early 1940, on which he was accompanied by Monkey Joe on piano with Fred Williams on drums.  Both Coleman and Scott perform only blues here, though as Scott said later, outside the recording studio they played "polka, Italian music, German music...blues too", whatever the customers wanted.

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #219 on: February 17, 2009, 06:03:25 PM »
Added Today: (Notes by DJ)

St. Louis:
 Jelly Roll Anderson, accompanied by Henry Johnson And His Boys
 Henry Johnson And His Boys:  Henry Johnson violin, James Johnson piano/celeste, Lonnie Johnson guitar, and Henry Moon or George Thomas, Hawaiian guitar
 Bert "Snake Root" Harrison with Lonnie Johnson on guitar, an unknown pianist, and possibly Andrew "Babe" Webb on cornet where heard
 Jesse Johnson with His Singers, including probably Edith North Johnson on solo female vocal, Baby Jay cornet, Ike Rodgers trombone, and unknown piano
 "Spider" Carter, accompanied by possibly Peetie Wheatstraw and Charles Avery on piano (on different songs) and Charley Jordan on guitar
 Ell-Zee Floyd accompanied by Charles Avery on piano
 Red Mike Bailey with Roosevelt Sykes on piano
 Jimmy Strange with Clifford Gibson on guitar and Clifford Hayes on violin
 Gerogia Boyd with J.D. Short on guitar where heard and Roosevelt Sykes on piano where heard

St. Louis Girls
 Katherine Baker, accompanied by Henry Johnson And His Boys
 Lizzie Washington, accompanied by Henry Johnson And His Boys, except for two songs accompanied by Eddie Miller on piano
 Elizabeth Washington, who is probably Lizzie Washington, with Aaron Sparks or Stump Johnson on piano on one song, and "Bell" on the other
 Johnnie Strauss, with probably Henry Brown on piano with unknowns on violin and guitar

These are two discs that don't get much respect from reviewers (see The Penguin Guide To The Blues), but I really love them.  The bulk of the material, everything featuring Henry Johnson And His Boys, was recorded by Genett in an April 1927 session featuring various St. Louis artists.  HJ and the boys provide accompaniments that are ambitious and somewhat sophisticated, while  simultaneously being loose and rough-and-ready.  Check out the Hawaiian march featuring Hawaiian guitar and celeste on "Blue Hawaii", and then see how the band moves from sophisticated to primitive with the addition of Henry Johnson's one-string fiddle on "Hawaiian Harmony Blues". When they accompany a vaudevillian like Jelly Roll Anderson, whose vocal models would seem to include Al Jolson, you can imagine both parties walking away from the session saying "You won't believe who I just had to record with!"  Jesse Johnson has been criticized for his singing, but "I Wish I Had Died In Egypt Land" is obviously a vaudeville piece, sung in the black vaudeville convention where the man takes the comedic part and the woman belts the blues (See Butterbeans And Susie or even Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe on their vocal duets).  As for the song itself, it probably made more sense as part of a vaudeville skit.  I wouldn't recommend either of these discs to introduce a stranger to the blues, and they wouldn't be high on my short list to take to a desert island, but as a peek into some the dustier corners of the blues world of the late 20s and early 30s, they're absolutely fascinating and stand up well to repeated listening.  The music isn't half as bad as it's often reputed to be!       

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #220 on: February 26, 2009, 07:13:52 AM »
Added Today: (Notes by DJ)

Frank "Springback" James and George Curry
- Willie Bee James on guitar and Fred Williams on drums accompany Springback James.  George Curry, who was noted as "Leroy's Best Friend" in the Vocalion files, is probably accompanied by Frank James on piano, Hobson "Hop" Johnson on guitar, and definitely by Unknown on bass.  Nothing is known of either artist, though James, on the evidence of song selection and vocal asides, may have been from Alabama.  Note writer Chris Smith puts it aptly - "In George Curry and Springback James we hear two of the everyday blues musicians of the thirties, always competent, capable of occasional flashes of individual artistry, but mostly content to acknowledge the inspiration of Leroy Carr".

Various Artists:  Great Harp Players - Richard Sowell accompanied by William Francis on guitar, Ollis Martin, El Watson, accompanied by Robert cooksey on second harmonica on "El Watson's Fox Chase", Palmer McAbee, George "Bullet" Williams, Blues Birdhead with The Bubbling-Over five (Bob Brown, vocal) or unknown piano, Ellis Williams, Alfred Lewis, and Smith and Harper.  All playing harmonica and occasionally singing, all accompanied by unknowns, except where noted above, where accompaniment is present.  A fascinating sampling of early harmonica repertoire.  I don't know if everything here would really count as "great", but it's all down-home, for sure.

Harlem Hamfats:  Harlem Hamfats Volume 3:  Herb Morand, Joe Mccoy, and Rosetta Howard on vocals, with Herb Morand (trumpet), Odell Rand or Buster Bailey (clarinet), Joe McCoy (guitar), Charlie McCoy (guitar and mandolin), John Lindsay (bass), and Fred Flynn (drums).

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #221 on: February 28, 2009, 02:47:44 PM »
Added Today: (Notes by DJ)

Sonny Boy Williamson - Sonny Boy Williamson Volume 4:  Sonny Boy's recordings from early 1941 to mid 1945.  Most of his previous sessions had had Sonny Boy playing with musicians that were somewhat "country", such as Big Joe Williams, Robert Lee McCoy, and Yank Rachell.  But this set finds him playing with the Chicago studio regulars.  The piano stool is held down by Blind John  Davis, except for the 1945 session where Eddie Boyd takes over.  The rest of the band includes guitarists Big Bill Broonzy, Charlie McCoy, Ted Summit, and Bill Sid Cox, bassists William Mitchell, Ransom Knowling, and Alfred Elkins, with Jump Jackson on drums on one session and Washboard Sam scratching the tin on another.

Charlie Spand - The Complete Paramounts:  Recorded 1929 - 1931.  Not much is known of Charlie Spand.  In "Evil Wonman Spell" he names Elljay Georgia as his birthplace.  He lived in Detroit in the 1920s, and Little Brother Montgomery recalled him working with Blind Blake in Chicago.  He must have been one of Paramount's better sellers, as he was one of the artists on "Hometown Skiffle".  Most of the cuts here are just Spand on vocal and piano, though Blind Blake makes an appearance on a few numbers, as does a different, unknown guitarist.

Bumble Bee Slim - Bumble Bee Slim Volume 2:  Jimmy Gordon, Black Bob, and Unknown on piano, Carl Martin, Ted Bogan, Willie Bee James, Charlie McCoy, and Bill Broonzy on guitar, and probably Howard Armstrong violin on "Blue Blues".

Offline Slack

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #222 on: March 06, 2009, 07:53:39 AM »

Added Today: (Notes by Uncle Bud)

Leadbelly - 1939-1947 Volume 5, 27 Oct 1944-Oct 1946 DOCD-5311

This disc combines a few rather different recording sessions. The first is from Hollywood, with excellent sound on 2 tracks (Sweet Mary Blues and Grasshoppers In My Pillow). There are a number of tracks taken from a radio recording of a concert Leadbelly did for children in San Francisco on Feb 15, 1945, the Standard School Broadcast. The show features numerous spoken intros here as he explains the songs to the kids, who are singing along on some songs. Then a session with Sonny and Brownie, plus Willie the Lion Smith (piano) and George "Pops" Foster (string bass). Last is a session with Woody Guthrie and Cisco Houston, recorded c. October 1946. There is mandolin on a few of these tracks, a jug on one (Fiddler's Dram, the most interesting, IMO), so possibly there is someone in addition to Woody and Cisco here. No mandolin or jug is listed in the instrumentation notes for the CD.

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #223 on: March 06, 2009, 08:40:12 AM »
Just to clarify, both Woody Guthrie and Cisco Houston are listed as playing guitar on these tracks. It could be Woody playing mandolin. I don't know if Cisco played mandolin. Or, it could be an unlisted player. The overall sound suggests to me there are not 3 guitars and a mando, so I suspect it's Woody.

Offline Bunker Hill

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Re: Weenie Juke Radio Changes/Additions
« Reply #224 on: March 06, 2009, 09:53:35 AM »
Added Today: (Notes by Uncle Bud)
Leadbelly - 1939-1947 Volume 5, 27 Oct 1944-Oct 1946 DOCD-5311

There are a number of tracks taken from a radio recording of a concert Leadbelly did for children in San Francisco on Feb 15, 1945, the Standard School Broadcast. The show features numerous spoken intros here as he explains the songs to the kids, who are singing along on some songs.
I don't know if it's the same concert but there's a photo of him entertaining children in the Lornell-Wolfe biography and somewhere I've other seen other shots of the same event.