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We could sit here and play five thousand blues... Because all three of us here now, we knows it. When he sings it (Brownie McGhee), when he starts it then it comes to me, and it comes to Sonny (Terry) and then to Brownie... Because you feel it from one another, which don't happen to all musicians though - Big Bill Broonzy

Author Topic: New Blind Blake  (Read 7525 times)

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Offline stunasty 55

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  • Posts: 14
  • “KAYA AY-WOAH GEE BACKUP!” -Leadbelly
Re: New Blind Blake
« Reply #45 on: January 05, 2018, 09:14:39 AM »
Sup fellas!

You ever consider that Blind Blake was just playing ?in character? for Champagne Charlie? The song seems to be about a sleezy guy who gets drunk every night, rambles town to town meeting young ladies, and even takes a bullet in Louisville?

I think the songs perfect!

Also, seeing that no one has replied here in the last decade, if anyone can help me out, which songs of Blind Blake?s are in the key of E?

Thanks fellas hoping to hear back!

Stu

Offline Prof Scratchy

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  • Posts: 1577
  • Howdy!
Re: New Blind Blake
« Reply #46 on: January 05, 2018, 09:29:39 AM »
Depression Done Gone From Me is in E I think?


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Offline oddenda

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  • Posts: 597
Re: New Blind Blake
« Reply #47 on: January 05, 2018, 07:20:45 PM »
     I think that "Champagne Charlie" and "Miss Emma Liza" are merely examples of Blake's non-blues repertoire. They seem to me like vaudeville pieces and can probably be traced back to sheet music of the day.
     In the same way that Luke Jordan's "Tom Brown Sits in his Prison Cell" sits in his repertoire. Remember that these folks repertoire often went beyond 12-bar stuff! The record companies had certain expectations and therefor much non-blues material was not recorded by them. Musicians had to be able to fulfill variable requests to be successful with their main black audience - note that many folks approaches changed over time as they followed their audience's desires, especially if they moved around... country to city being the big one.

pbl

Offline banjochris

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  • Posts: 1998
Re: New Blind Blake
« Reply #48 on: January 05, 2018, 11:57:38 PM »
Depression Done Gone From Me is in E I think?


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Yes, and Cherry Hill Blues behind Irene Scruggs.

 


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