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Boy, everybody's bin asking me one damn thing or another. I'll sing you something from that record when I get out there. You're here to hear me sing, ain't ya? - Lightnin' Hopkins responds to a young Alan Balfour's request to sign an album sleeve

Author Topic: Pre War Recording Techniques  (Read 4786 times)

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Offline SitkaMando

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2008, 05:57:30 PM »

Offline blueshome

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2008, 03:28:47 AM »
Thanks, great links.  Here's another to a photo showing multiple mics in the 20's.
http://s117.photobucket.com/albums/o41/lady-kamikaze/?action=view&current=03000_72.jpg

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #17 on: January 24, 2012, 08:29:09 AM »
via a link from Document records...

Offline Rivers

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2012, 06:18:28 PM »
That is so cool. What is that little curtain thingy for, do you suppose? I can't discern if it's in front of the drummer's face or behind. And what is that wild arrangement of, er, 'stuff', stapled to the wall above the logo? Oh wait, maybe that's what the curtain is hanging from(?). I hope they turned off the fans when doing a take.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2012, 06:27:01 PM by Rivers »

Offline banjochris

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2012, 09:04:31 PM »
I suspect the curtain was to try to block sound out to ensure that only the focused sound coming through the cone made it into the other room. The curtain's hanging from the rod right above the curtain. Judging from this photo:
http://bixography.com/images2/Wolverines.jpg
the stuff at the top was originally some kind of hanging support for the cones, plus judging from the way the musicians look, they definitely turned off the fans.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2012, 09:03:44 AM by banjochris »

Offline Rivers

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2012, 09:36:41 PM »
Holy crap! The other room? I assume you mean the picket fence railing in the foreground?  :P
« Last Edit: January 24, 2012, 09:42:23 PM by Rivers »

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2012, 06:49:07 AM »
Here's another studio shot, showing the Columbians Dance Orchestra, taken at Columbia studios in the Gotham Bank Building, Broadway and 59th Street, New York, in c. October 1921. Got it from this page which has a bunch of great early jazz etc photos: http://www.jazzhound.net/photographs.htm




Offline banjochris

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #22 on: January 25, 2012, 09:03:24 AM »
Holy crap! The other room? I assume you mean the picket fence railing in the foreground?  :P

No, I meant wherever the cones are leading to, which is I assume to the disc cutting machine in another room or alcove behind the back wall.

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2012, 09:12:12 AM »
Chris - in the Columbians' photo, any idea about the discs suspended from the ceiling? Also, there must've been some science involved in deciding who got to stand on a mini podium, who got to sit on a seat on the floor, and who got to sit on the high-chair! I assume that these guys were playing into one horn, obscured by someone's head? Thanks for the site link, by the way.

Offline Bald Melon Jefferson

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2012, 10:43:51 AM »
 David Bennett Cohen!?
Sorry to hijack the thread ...Mr. Cohen doesn't know it but he is currently in the very early stages of attempting to teach me some piano playin. If he does a good enough job...it will be on to dvd #2.
(Then I can be mediocre/good enough on 2 instruments!)

Regards, Gary
I now return you to your regularly-scheduled topic.
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Offline uncle bud

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2012, 11:24:24 AM »
Another one from the same site. Identified as "Bailey's Lucky Seven in Gennett's New York Studios, February 10, 1923. Probable personnel ( L-R):- Sam Lanin (pretending to blow clarinet), unknown, not Loren McMurray or Benny Krueger), Nick Lucas (not Eddie Lang as has been conjectured), Phil Napoleon (with back to camera), Joe Lanin, Miff Mole, Jules Levy Jr."

Scratchy, in the Columbians shot, those things hanging from the ceiling are explained as music clips hung from lateral wires so they can be repositioned easily.

Offline Kokomo O

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2012, 11:36:47 AM »
Those multiple cones bring up an interesting question, which reminds me of the recording display at the Edison Museum in West Orange, NJ, where they have a room with dozens of different sized and shaped cones. I want to speculate that the two cones sticking out of the window of that pic of the Wolverines are there to feed to a single cutter head, and that they are picking up different  instruments with different frequency characteristics--like using different mics with different response curves, or applying different EQ to different mics on the way in.

Offline blueshome

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2012, 01:28:05 PM »
Re the Columbians

The various stages and the guitarist's high chair bring all the instruments to the same level, presumably in line with the horn.

Online eric

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2012, 02:32:19 PM »
 Yes, they did all sorts of fiddling about with horn and instrument placement in those days.  There are guys around that still do acoustic recording.  Peter Dilg is one; you can buy newly recorded cylinders from him.  By the way, if you think we're eccentric, try hanging around phonograph and record collectors for a while... ::)
--
Eric

Offline jelly roll

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Re: Pre War Recording Techniques
« Reply #29 on: March 06, 2012, 03:30:18 PM »
This has got nothing to do with the recording techniques but it's great to hear that you can name Big Bill's backing band - is it the same as the state street swingers?
Do you know any more about them?
Were they the same band that backed Washboard Sam>
Do you know of any books / websites which document all this stuff?
Cheers jr

 


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