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Said when I die, don't bury me at all. Just pickle my body... up in alcohol - John Byrd, 1930

Author Topic: Joe Callicott Lyrics  (Read 23062 times)

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Offline Slack

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Joe Callicott Lyrics
« on: August 09, 2003, 05:42:15 PM »
Hey UB,

Here is my transcription of Callicott's Frankie, if you agree with most of it - I'll post it over in the Lyric section. (Or anyone else feel free to correct)  I'm going to change some of the words/phrasing in order to give myself a better shot at performing it, but thought I'd post my take on the original, some of which is hard to understand.

Frankie
Joe Callicott

Frankie she was a good little girl
Everybody knows
They say she spent 41 dollars
For Albert, a suit of clothes
That's my man, he ain't a treatin' me wrong (sic)

Albert went down to the saloon
He didn't stand in no fear
Sittin' down there, smokin' a big cigar
Women all buyin' him beer
You is my man, now you're doin' me wrong

Frankie went down to the saloon
She called for a can of beer
Whispered to the bartender
Has my man Albert wandered in here
That's my man, and he's treatin me wrong

The bartender told Frankie
Ain't a gonna tell you no lie
He left here just a few minutes ago
With a girl they call Alice Fly
That's my man, now he's doin' me wrong

Frankie broke down Alice Fly's home
She didn't make no alarm
That's where she found her man Albert
Layin' in Alice's arms
You is my man, well and you doin' me wrong

Albert told Frankie
Told her once or twice
If I ever catch you myself a checkin'
I'm surely goin' to take your life
He treated me wrong, now he's dead and gone.


Offline uncle bud

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Re:Joe Callicott
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2003, 09:44:48 AM »
Hey UB,

Here is my transcription of Callicott's Frankie, if you agree with most of it - I'll post it over in the Lyric section. (Or anyone else feel free to correct)  I'm going to change some of the words/phrasing in order to give myself a better shot at performing it, but thought I'd post my take on the original, some of which is hard to understand.

Frankie
Joe Callicott

Frankie she was a good little girl
Everybody knows
They say she spent 41 dollars
For Albert, a suit of clothes
I hear:
Say she paid 41 dollars
For Albert's suit of clothes
Quote

That's my man, he ain't a treatin' me wrong (sic)

Albert went down to the saloon
He didn't stand in no fear
Hard to hear that line. It could be "stand in no fear" but possibly something else. Don't know what! Ditto below on the "there" in Sittin down there. It fits but I think I hear something else.
Quote

Sittin' down there, smokin' a big cigar
Women all buyin' him beer
You is my man, now you're doin' me wrong

Frankie went down to the saloon
She called for a can of beer
Whispered to the bartender
He says bartender here as barty-tender or party-tender, as he does at the start of the next verse.
Quote
Has my man Albert wandered in here
That's my man, and he's treatin me wrong

The bartender told Frankie
Ain't a gonna tell you no lie
He left here just a few minutes ago
With a girl they call Alice Fly
That's my man, now he's doin' me wrong

Frankie broke down Alice Fly's home
She didn't make no alarm

Again this fits ("alarm"), but I hear something different that sounds like it ends in "long". Not sure.

Quote
That's where she found her man Albert
Layin' in Alice's arms
You is my man, well and you doin' me wrong

Albert told Frankie
Told her once or twice
If I ever catch you myself a checkin'
I'm surely goin' to take your life
He treated me wrong, now he's dead and gone.

The only other thing is you've added in a few " 's " where he drops them, and dropped an s where he says one in "womens". Otherwise, by George, I think you've got it. :)

Listening to the CD to check these lyrics on the computer, I've moved on to track 2 (Fare Thee Well Blues, not to be confused with the Fare You Well Blues that Rishell does a version of and calls Fare Thee Well). As JohnM says, it's very Henry Thomas. With a slightly deeper groove. Played out of D position. I don't hear dropped D, which one might be inclined to go to - he seems to stick to the A and 4th string D alternation. Another great tune.

andrew

Offline Slack

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Re:Joe Callicott
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2003, 01:42:59 PM »
UB, well I thought you might agree with most of it. ;) ?- I always try to go with context and try to adjust for the accent e.g. I think it is typical that Alarm would be pronounced "Uh L?m" (think that is the right symbol). Let's see if anyone else takes a shot.

Anyway, if you are hooked on Callicott you might pick up Mississippi Blues Vol. 2 "Blow My Blues Away" on Arhoolie, (comments by George Mitchel and David Evans (1968) ) - there is some repeat material of course, but additional Mitchel tracks too. ?The bonus are two Callicott tracks recorded in 1930 - Traveling Mama Blues and Fare Thee Well Blues - Callicott in his prime. ?One confusing thing is ?Arhoolie and Fat Possum flip-flop the names of "Fare Thee Well Blues" and "Fare You Well Blues". ?

cheers,
slack
« Last Edit: April 10, 2005, 07:11:59 PM by Johnm »

Offline uncle bud

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Re:Joe Callicott
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2003, 08:23:18 AM »
Yup, got this one, as per above.  According to Arhoolie, it is now out of print, so unless you find it used, the one to get is Fat Possum.

The flipflop of song titles is indeed confusing.

Offline Sudsbury

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Re:Joe Callicott
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2003, 11:05:51 AM »
Hey Slack; Uncle Bud,
Thanks for this! I have been struggling with some of the Frankie & Albert lyrics.  Didn't hear quite the same words as you in a few spots, but I'll go back with your lyrics in hand and listen again - see if I agree. 8)
Sudbury
Sudbury

Offline Slack

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Frankie - Joe Callicott
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2003, 08:41:28 PM »
Close enough.  :P

Frankie
Joe Callicott

Frankie she was a good little girl
Everybody knows
They say she spent 41 dollars
For Albert, a suit of clothes
That's my man, he ain't a treatin' me wrong

Albert went down to the saloon
He didn't stand in no fear
Sittin' down there, smokin' a big cigar
Women all buyin' him beer
You is my man, now you're doin' me wrong

Frankie went down to the saloon
She called for a can of beer
Whispered to the bartender
Has my man Albert wandered in here
That's my man, he ain't a-treating me wrong

The bartender told Frankie
Ain't a gonna tell you no lie
He left here just a few minutes ago
With a girl they call Alice Fly
That's my man, now he's doin' me wrong

Frankie broke down Alice Fly's home
She didn't make no alarm
That's where she found her man Albert
Layin' in Alice's arms
You is my man, well and you doin' me wrong

Albert told Frankie
Told her once or twice
If I ever catch you myself a checkin'
I'm surely goin' to take your life
He treated me wrong, now he's dead and gone.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2003, 10:02:21 AM by Slack »

Offline Johnm

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Re:Frankie - Joe Callicott
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2003, 09:28:18 AM »
Hi John,
Lyrics look good.  I differ in a couple of inconsequential ways that aren't worth citing.  One of the amazing things about this version of Frankie, I think, is that in the refrain line to each verse, it is as though you have an omniscient Frankie commenting on the Albert's behavior in each verse, so that in the third verse, before she knows for sure that he is messing around, she says, "That's my man, he ain't a-treating me wrong.".  Fascinating.  Also, I wonder why the song is truncated and ends where it does.  In the LP era, there was no reason to stop the song early.  Maybe the last verse Joe sang is the last verse in this version.  If so, it is even odder.  Maybe he just forgot the rest of the lyrics.
All Best,
John

Offline Slack

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Re:Frankie - Joe Callicott
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2003, 10:20:15 AM »

Hi John, amazing where careful listening will get you.  ;)

"He ain't a treatin' me wrong" is in the first verse also and I never viewed is as 'hopeful' commentary by Frankie (I thought it was a mistake!) - but it makes sense and I like it (Frankie does not want to believe that Albert is treating her wrong, very natural) - and so I changed it.  And don't be shy about inconsequential changes - because, well, no one else is.  ;)

I think the last verse ends abruptly for dramatic effect.  You've got Albert threatening Frankie and all of a sudden
it is Albert who is dead. End of Albert, end of song, wow, the one two punch.

I think all versions of Frankie lean toward justifiable homicide, much sympathy is created for Frankie --  and even more so in this version because Albert is threatening to kill Frankie.

Hmmm, maybe we need to have one of those "men's group" meetings and fight this homicidal trend over a little cheating... ;D

cheers,
 

Offline uncle bud

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Re:Frankie - Joe Callicott
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2003, 05:11:31 PM »

I think all versions of Frankie lean toward justifiable homicide, much sympathy is created for Frankie --  and even more so in this version because Albert is threatening to kill Frankie.

Hmmm, maybe we need to have one of those "men's group" meetings and fight this homicidal trend over a little cheating... ;D

One of the things that appeals to me about Frankie, not just Joe Callicott's version is the murder ballad feminism of the song. It's a great story, not just one of those A to Z Blues sort of "gonna kill my woman" kind of tunes.

Bob Dylan does a version which is still sympathetic to Frankie but where she is hanged. Any other versions where Frankie dies too?

uncle bud

Offline GhostRider

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Traveling Mama Blues by Joe Callicott
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2004, 10:08:41 AM »
Hi all:

The lyrics to this one could be quite a challenge (at least they were to me). I'm tryin' to learn this one and Garfield Akers "Jumpin' and Shoutin' Blues" to flesh out my repetoire of "dance tunes".

Traveling Mama Blues
Joe Callicott

Instrumental introduction

(1) Well I sure like mama, ??? your daddy by
Well I surely mama, ??? your daddy by
Said ??? I grown most too high

(2) When you see your rider in and out the road
When you see your rider, howlin' in the road
Said she ??? back in 1934

(3) How she doin' things that you don't never know
??? she doin' things you don't never knew
(instrumental)

(4) ??? stop and listen ??? how she blow
Said now stop and listen, ??? how she blow
??? made them wanna go

(5) With my girl in the daytime, I walk with her ???
Walkin' my good girl in the daytime, walk with her ???
???? how to treat a good man right

(6) When you doin' me mama ??? outta sight
When you doin' me mama, ??? outta sight
????a good man do, well it be's alright

(7) I'm gonna jack me a ??? yard back fence
I'm gonna jack me a ???? yard back fence
??? whuppin' learn the good girl some sense

(Eight) (instrummental)
(hummed)
(hummed)

(9) Well I doin' I do ???do-la-do
Well I doin' I do , doin' I do-la do
????? 'bout you

(10) Instrumental verse

Best of luck and thanks,
Alex


[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: January 11, 2007, 08:41:40 AM by GhostRider »

Offline Slack

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Re: Traveling Mama Blues by Joe Calicott
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2004, 08:04:49 AM »
Hi Alex,

I listened to this a couple of times last night - and it obviously needs a lot more listening. :) - so I'll try and give a listen again tonight.  Here is the little I gleaned:
Quote
(1) Well I sure like mama,  your daddy by
Well I surely mama,  your daddy by
Said  I grown most too high

Well now surely mama.
Can't tell your daddy bye (x2)
Said I want to let you know
I growed most too high

Quote
(2) When you see your rider in and out the road
When you see your rider, howlin' in the road
Said she  back in 1934

When you see your rider,
In an out the road
When you see your rider
Out and In the road
Said she (?? turnin' on a fan??)
like in 1934
Quote
(3) How she doin' things that you don't never know
 she doin' things you don't never knew
(instrumental)

I hear 'don't ever know'

Quote
(5) With my girl in the daytime, I walk with her
Walkin' my good girl in the daytime, walk with her
? how to treat a good man right

With my girl in the daytime
I walk with her at night.

...and that's about as far as I got.

Happy St. Paddy's day   ;D
slack

Offline Johnm

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Re: Traveling Mama Blues by Joe Calicott
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2004, 09:40:01 AM »
Hi Alex,
Here's most of a couple more verses to add to what you and John D. heard.

Way you're doing me, mama, babe, it's outa sight
Way you're doing me, mama, babe, is outa sight
Said, "Anything a kidman do, well it be's alright

I'm gonna jack me a paling from my yard's back fence
I'm gonna jack me a paling from my yard's back fence
I'm gonna put a whupping, learn the good girl some sense

Well, I do and I do, double do love you
Well, I do and I do, do and I do love you
Say, there ain't nothin' about me ain't  ?  'bout you

all best,
Johnm

Offline GhostRider

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Re: Traveling Mama Blues by Joe Calicott
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2004, 02:27:09 PM »
Well now surely mama.
Can't tell your daddy bye (x2)
Said I want to let you know
I growed most too high

I like the last two lines of this. In the first two I hear a word before can't and I don't hear tell
Quote
When you see your rider,
In an out the road
When you see your rider
Out and In the road
Said she (?? turnin' on a fan??)
like in 1934

I think this is perfect, but what the heck does turnin' on a fan mean???
Quote
I hear 'don't ever know'

I agree

Quote
With my girl in the daytime
I walk with her at night.

I like this as well.

Alex

Offline Richard

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Re: Traveling Mama Blues by Joe Calicott
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2004, 02:05:47 PM »
"Said she (?? turnin' on a fan??) like in 1934"

I think this is - "Said she's turning on a "band" (?) like a 1930 Ford"

And possibly the "band" is as in the epicyclic (which I can't spell tonight) gearbox bands a la Henry Ford. With Ford pronounced Foad...

I rest my case ;)

(That's enough of that. Ed)

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Traveling Mama Blues by Joe Calicott
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2004, 07:42:27 PM »

(4) ??? stop and listen ??? how she blow
Said now stop and listen, ??? how she blow
??? made them wanna go

I hear

??? make the motor go

in the last line. The preceding line might be "Said I stop and listened wanna know how she blow"

Quote
(5) With my girl in the daytime, I walk with her ???
Walkin' my good girl in the daytime, walk with her ???
???? how to treat a good man right

With my girl in the daytime, I walk with her at night
Walk with my good girl in the daytime, walk with her at night
Said I'm tryin'a teach and tell her how to treat a good man right

Quote
(6) When you doin' me mama ??? outta sight
When you doin' me mama, ??? outta sight
????a good man do, well it be's alright

Way you doin' me mama says is outta sight
Way you doin' me mama, says is outta sight
????a good man do, well it be's alright

 


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