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Wow - but Bessie Smith spills fire and fury in Hateful Blues on Columbia Record 14023D. Talk about hymns of hate - Bessie sure is a him-hater on this record. The way she tells what she is going to do with her "butcher" will make trifling fellows catch express trains going at 60 miles an hour. The music is full of hate too. You can almost see hate drip from the piano keys. Every note is a half-note. No quarter for anyone - Chicago defender ad, July 1924

Author Topic: Mandolin Blues  (Read 41041 times)

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Offline mr mando

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #120 on: April 14, 2012, 09:42:25 AM »
Listening again, I realized both instruments play in the same register at the start of the tune. The tenor chord is 7-7-9-10 (g-d-b-g) and the mandoln plays tremolo the two highest strings (x-x-2-3). The second chord on the tenor is 9-8-9-9 (B7), and the mandolin seems to tremoloe two notes again (x-x-0-2). So the top notes are the same at the beginning. Later, though, the mandolin changes to a lower register.

Offline Rivers

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #121 on: September 07, 2012, 06:16:11 PM »
Just a shout out for Johnny Young's mandolin playing on this thread. Johnny played guitar as well. In addition to his excellent mandolin I like his guitar playing, vocalizing and that 60's Chicago sound in general.

Chicago Blues (Arhoolie) has four (I believe) tracks with Young on mando, and is an all around classic album I reckon, what with Otis Spann, James Cotton and Walter Horton on board.

Johnny plays mandolin on seven tracks on Johnny Young and His Friends (Testament). Accompanists include Spann, John Lee Granderson, Walter Horton, Little Walter Jacobs and Robert Nighthawk.

Rich DelGrosso did an excellent class at Port T exploring JY's playing, which is why I thought I'd mention it after picking up the aforementioned records.

Johnny Young page from Stefan's site: http://www.wirz.de/music/youngfrm.htm

And a nice shot from Stefan's site:
« Last Edit: September 07, 2012, 06:21:42 PM by Rivers »

Offline MuddyBuddy

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  • Bert Deivert - blues mandolin
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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #122 on: September 08, 2012, 02:04:24 AM »
Hi,

since my focus is mainly on Yank Rachell and Carl Martin, I would be really interested in hearing what Rich had to say about Johnny Young's playing, if anybody has an audio file from the course! I would gladly trade a download of my latest blues mandolin album, KID MAN BLUES, for a listen to the file. Rich is a great guy and surely a great teacher. I don't play Johnny Young at all, but have listened to his albums and looked for his signature licks. Since he was the only electric player that emerged AFTER WWII he is an important figure, in that sense for blues mandolin history.

all the best
BERT

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #123 on: September 08, 2012, 07:57:22 AM »
Rich covers some Johnny Young styles in his book, Mandolin Blues.

Offline MuddyBuddy

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #124 on: September 08, 2012, 08:30:13 AM »
Yes I have the book. Just thought it would be nice to listen to Rich's own words.
Haven't seen him since around 2008 in Memphis.
Cheers
BERT

Offline Rivers

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #125 on: September 13, 2012, 06:46:52 PM »
Three 'Baccer Tags, Get Your Head In Here, and Ain't Gonna Do It No More, available on the the Gastonia Gallop (Old Hat)  comp which is pretty indispensible all round IMO. These guys are particularly cool since they have two mandos in the band and a really good accompanying guitarist. There's also a lot of other really good stuff on Gastonia Gallop.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2012, 06:53:30 PM by Rivers »

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #126 on: October 29, 2013, 06:58:12 PM »
For aspiring mandolin players, Homespun Tapes have Steve James' 2-volume Blues Mandolin lessons on sale for 50% till Wednesday midnight as a download only. Discount code is STEVEHAPPY.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2013, 07:00:38 PM by uncle bud »

Offline Lastfirstface

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #127 on: October 29, 2013, 09:55:53 PM »
I think I found one that isn't in the big list:

I was listening to some Bumble Bee Slim on youtube, and came across a track called "Someday Things Will Be Breaking My Way". Its a song in the "Sitting On Top of the World" mold with Easton's singing accompanied by piano, guitar, and mandolin. Looking in B&GR its seems the 78 I was listening to as well seven other sides from 1934,were credited to "Bumble Bee Slim and His Three Sharks", but it lists all accompanists as 'unknown'. Carl Martin on mando maybe? I'd like to hear the other cuts from this session.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #128 on: December 01, 2015, 04:31:43 PM »
Hi all,
I happened to find this track, "Jail Break Blues", by Texas Tommy.  I've never heard of the artist before,  and don't know who the mandolinist was, let alone the singer and tuba player.  Here is the track, and they have another one, "Trinity River Bottom Blues":



All best,
Johnm

Offline dj

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #129 on: December 04, 2015, 05:31:16 PM »
Quote
I've never heard of the artist before,  and don't know who the mandolinist was, let alone the singer and tuba player.

Texas Tommy's sides were recorded in Dallas Texas in "late October" of 1928.  The singer, guitar player, and tuba player are unknown.  The mandolin player is "possibly" Caffrie Darensbourg. 

I assume Caffrie was somehow related to Percy Darensbourg who played banjo with Frenchie's String Band in Dallas on December 5, 1928 and played guitar backing Effie Scott in the same city on October 26, 1929.  According to Blues: A Regional Experience, Percy was Percy L. D'Arensbourg, born in 1902 in Dallas.  You could assume similar biographical info for Caffrie.   

Offline Johnm

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Re: Mandolin Blues
« Reply #130 on: December 04, 2015, 07:10:48 PM »
Thanks for that information, dj.  It's nice to get some background on the players.  I like the singer's trilled "r" sounds on that track--shades of Ethel Waters.
All best,
Johnm

 


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