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He had a left hand like God. He didn't know what key he was playing in, but he played them all. He could play the ragtime stride bass, but it bothered him because his stomach got in the way of his arm, so he used a walking bass instead. I can remember when I was thirteen - this was 1896 - how Turk would play one note with his right hand and at the same time four with his left. We called it 'sixteen' - they called it boogie-woogie - Eubie Blake remembering William Turk, from Giles Oakley's The Devil's Music, BBC

Author Topic: Joe and Charlie McCoy gravestone benefit  (Read 1256 times)

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Offline arlotone

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Joe and Charlie McCoy gravestone benefit
« on: April 10, 2010, 09:30:06 PM »
Hello,

I'm organizing a benefit concert to buy gravestones for Joe and Charlie McCoy. They both died in 1950 and were buried about 20 yards away from each other in unmarked graves.

The concert is Oct. 3 in Chicago. More details here:

http://www.mccoybrotherstribute.com

Since starting this project, I've ended up playing a lot more mandolin. "Jackson Stomp" is so much fun!

Cheers,
-Arlo

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Joe and Charlie McCoy gravestone benefit
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2010, 08:44:01 AM »
Hey Arlo - great that you're doing this. Both Charlie and Joe deserve as much recognition as anyone can throw their way. Two of the greats of country blues.

I'm curious (and this isn't necessarily a question for Arlo, more for anyone). Was Charlie McCoy called Papa Charlie regularly? I know the Blues and Gospel Records tome lists one two-day session under this moniker and two more under the name "Mississippi Mudder (Papa Charlie)" in 1934. Then in 1936 we get Papa Charlie's Boys recording four songs. Is there some evidence of it being used beyond these few records?

(And have I asked this question before?  :P I know I've thought it before. No time to let my brain catch up with itself... onward...)
« Last Edit: April 11, 2010, 08:55:13 AM by uncle bud »

Offline arlotone

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Re: Joe and Charlie McCoy gravestone benefit
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2010, 09:56:04 PM »
I'm curious (and this isn't necessarily a question for Arlo, more for anyone). Was Charlie McCoy called Papa Charlie regularly? I know the Blues and Gospel Records tome lists one two-day session under this moniker and two more under the name "Mississippi Mudder (Papa Charlie)" in 1934. Then in 1936 we get Papa Charlie's Boys recording four songs. Is there some evidence of it being used beyond these few records?

I'd like to know this, too. I was thinking of putting one (of the many) of each brothers' nicknames on their gravestones. "Kansas Joe" seems obvious, but is "Papa Charlie" that representative?

Offline arlotone

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Re: Joe and Charlie McCoy gravestone benefit
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2010, 07:41:51 PM »
Hello again,

At this point the bands are booked, the songs are (mostly) selected and tickets are on sale for this event. I've set up a Charlie McCoy mandolin workshop and a Joe McCoy guitar workshop on the afternoon of the show, as well as a walking tour of Restvale Cemetery. It's going to be "McCoy Brothers Day" in Chicago on Oct. 3!

If any of you live nearby, you can find ticket and registration links on this page:

http://www.mccoybrotherstribute.com/events.html

If you'd like to support the project from afar, you can visit this page to send a donation:

http://www.mccoybrotherstribute.com/donations.html

Buying two gravestones is starting to feel like an overly ambitious goal, so any contributions will be greatly appreciated.

Cheers,
-Arlo

 


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