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The blues - that is a feeling that makes you feel very bad. The blues'll give you sickness - from there's a pain you've never had. Now here's the way the blues go - it'll jump on you early in the morning. It'll worry you 'til you go to sleep. Then after you fall to sleep, you get to dreamin' them bad old dreams and it give you nothing but the bad old midnight creeps - Lightnin' Hopkins', spoken intro to Blues Is A Feeling

Author Topic: Furry Lewis Lyrics  (Read 25804 times)

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Offline banjochris

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Re: Furry Lewis Lyrics
« Reply #90 on: September 29, 2017, 11:22:00 AM »
Such a great version of this song, Furry really puts a lot of feeling into it. One suggestion on the lyrics, John:

3.2 For the help HEW the mountain down

Chris

Offline Johnm

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Re: Furry Lewis Lyrics
« Reply #91 on: September 29, 2017, 11:39:55 AM »
Hi Chris,
Thanks for the catch.  I was hearing an "s" at the end of the syllable in question, heard the "h" at the beginning, and thought "hews" would be a weird construction there, but re-listening, I think it's just some artifact of how "hew" transitions into "the" that was confusing me.  "Hew" certainly makes more sense, and I'm hearing the sound right, too, so I've made the change.  Thanks!
All best,
Johnm

Offline banjochris

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Re: Furry Lewis Lyrics
« Reply #92 on: September 29, 2017, 11:46:43 AM »
I heard that phantom "s," too, John, and agree it's just a weird transition. 
Chris

Offline Johnm

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Re: Furry Lewis Lyrics
« Reply #93 on: October 09, 2017, 10:49:14 AM »
Hi all,
Furry Lewis' Folkways album opens with "Longing Blues", played in Spanish tuning.  The song is very much, instrumentally, in the mode of "Rock Island Blues" or "Black Gypsy Blues" of his early recordings, though it differs from them in Furry's sparing use of a slide, which he eschewed on the earlier recordings.  Furry really just uses the slide in the response to to the repetition of his opening line in a couple of the verses.  Here is his performance of "Longing Blues":



INTRO SOLO

Babe, going away, baby, crying won't make me stay
Babe, goin' away, crying won't make me stay
If I had train fare, Lord, I wouldn't be here today

I woke up this morning and blues all 'round my bed
Woke up this morning, blues all 'round my bed
I looked under my pillow, blues all under my head

Boy, I'm sorry, sorry, sorry to my heart
Babe, I'm sorry, sorry to my heart
We've been together so long, now today we got to part

SOLO

Been together so long, now we've got to part

If you ever want to hear me blow my horn, come to my number when old Stella's gone
If you ever hear me, hear be blow my horn
Come to my number, oh when old Stella's gone

All best,
Johnm






Offline Parakeet Pete

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Re:Black Gypsy Blues - Furry Lewis
« Reply #94 on: November 05, 2017, 01:12:54 AM »

I had never heard the term "Sally Long" used before.  Very interesting because Sam McGee had an instrumental on his first Folkways record called "Sally Long", which is the closest thing to John Hurt's solo on "Candyman" that I have heard.  Sam's tune was an instrumental.

Sally Long was a dancer (and film star) in the years prior to Furry recording this (28 August 1928 according to my Document Records issue) so it's highly possible that her name became used for a type of dance or, as has been suggested, a euphemism for something more, err, "personal".  >:D

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sally_Long
When I die I don't want no preacher or grave. Just send me to Document Records.

Offline Parakeet Pete

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Re: Furry Lewis Lyrics
« Reply #95 on: November 05, 2017, 02:53:57 AM »
Regarding "Kassie Jones - Part 2".

What is an "eastman"? I'm more familiar with the line in the Grateful Dead's "On The Road Again" (traditional) which sounds like "She's on the road again, sure as you're born, Natural born easy on the road again".

Sorry if this is a du-umb question. I'm a foreigner with cloth ears.
When I die I don't want no preacher or grave. Just send me to Document Records.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Furry Lewis Lyrics
« Reply #96 on: November 05, 2017, 05:28:20 AM »
Hi Pete,
"Eastman" was explained to me as a man who lives off of a woman's earnings.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Parakeet Pete

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Re: Furry Lewis Lyrics
« Reply #97 on: November 05, 2017, 07:29:54 AM »
Hi Pete,
"Eastman" was explained to me as a man who lives off of a woman's earnings.
All best,
Johnm

Thank-you for the enlightenment.
When I die I don't want no preacher or grave. Just send me to Document Records.

Offline TenBrook

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« Last Edit: November 06, 2017, 09:09:02 AM by TenBrook »

Offline Chezztone

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Re: Furry Lewis Lyrics
« Reply #99 on: November 09, 2017, 01:31:07 PM »
There was an "Eastman gang" around the turn of the century. There were based in New York but became nationally notorious. When Furry Lewis (and the Memphis Jug Band) sing about being a "natural born Eastman" I think they mean a natural gangster, hustler.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastman_Gang

 


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