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Author Topic: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!  (Read 5282 times)

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Offline uncle bud

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Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« on: April 24, 2005, 12:17:51 PM »
Press release re. the Alan Lomax Archive which, as of this post, was temporarily unavailable.


The Alan Lomax Archive is pleased to announce the
culmination of its seven-year effort to preserve and
disseminate the work of one of the 20th century's
foremost folklorists and musicologists, Alan Lomax.

Alan Lomax believed it was imperative to return
traditions to their home sources and artists, a
strategy he called cultural feedback." In that
spirit, on April 22, 2005 The Alan Lomax Database will
go online; also, over the next ten months, the
Association for Cultural Equity, which administers
the Alan Lomax Archive, will send digital copies of
audio and video recordings and photographs by Alan
Lomax to a number of libraries and archives in the
U.S., the Caribbean, and Europe so that they will be
available locally to people in or from the regions in
which they were originally made.

The Alan Lomax Database, www.lomaxarchive.com, is a
free service. This multimedia catalog of the audio and
video recordings and photographs made by
Alan Lomax from 1946 - 1994 is designed to be an
inclusive record of Lomax's recordings of music and
the spoken word; it thus documents all recordings,
including interrupted tracks and false starts. It can
be searched by performer, song title, geography,
culture, genre, subject, instrument, collection,
session, and recording date. Users can print out
single-page reports of their search results.
Photographs taken by Lomax during the field
trips are linked to the appropriate sessions and also
available in a separate searchable catalog. Every
audio recording in the catalog can be heard in samples
of forty seconds (music, spoken word) to two minutes
(radio shows, discussions, lectures).

The first six collections to go on line are: Texas
Gladden & Hobart Smith 1946; Calypso Concert 1946;
Mississippi Prison Recordings 1947 and 1948; Big
Bill Broonzy 1952; Southern Journey US 1959 and 1960;
and Central Park Concert 1965. These will be followed
by the remainder of Lomax's fieldtrips, each to go
on-line as they are completed.? It will also
ultimately include some of the older collections of
audio recordings made by Lomax on behalf of the
Library of Congress in the 1930's and 1940's.

The Alan Lomax Archive is also in the process of
donating digital copies of selected collections to
some 20 libraries and archives in the U.S. and abroad,
largely in the regions in which the recordings were
made. Donation agreements have been signed with
fifteen of these institutions. By the end of 2005, a
total of 4,500 hours of audio recordings and 2,014
hours of video recordings will have been disseminated.

For more information and materials on the Alan Lomax
Archives contact:

Howard?
Howlin' Wuelf Media
527 Barclay Ave.
Morrisville, PA 19067
215-428-9119
http://howlinwuelf.com/
« Last Edit: April 24, 2005, 12:19:00 PM by uncle bud »

boots

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Re: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2005, 01:57:11 PM »
A terrific link UB. I'll be having a nose a soon as it is back online,

Cheers,
Boots

Offline KC King

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Re: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2005, 02:39:54 PM »
Thank You, UB - While I currently have about 25 of the Rounder, Alan Lomax releases - that is but a smidgen of the recordings he did. I will spend way tooo much time on this site.  :D
KC (Chris) King

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2005, 02:57:44 PM »
It sure sounds like it will be an amazing site...

Offline Slack

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Re: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2005, 03:03:11 PM »
Wow, that is just tremendous.

It is unclear to me how one would listen to something beyond the 'samples' - the 20 other libraries?

boots

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Re: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2005, 04:13:39 PM »
I think some should get online. The Internet Archive perhaps  :-\

Offline waxwing

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Re: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2005, 06:13:04 PM »
Thanks, UB, I ?copied it to the 'shed and IGS. Very Cool.
All for now.
John C.
"People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it."
George Bernard Shaw

http://www.youtube.com/user/WaxwingJohn
https://www.facebook.com/WaxwingJohn

Willie Brown's Liquor at CD Baby

lebordo

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Re: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2005, 01:04:30 PM »
It is unclear to me how one would listen to something beyond the 'samples' - the 20 other libraries?

I wondered the same thing, Slack.

Perhaps you could contact the person listed in Uncle Bud's original post and get the WC Juke certified as an "Internet Blues Library" -- then the juke could could get copies of all the full selections:

Howard 
Howlin' Wuelf Media
527 Barclay Ave.
Morrisville, PA 19067
215-428-9119
http://howlinwuelf.com/

Offline Slack

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Re: Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online!
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2005, 01:14:28 PM »
Quote
Perhaps you could contact the person listed in Uncle Bud's original post and get the WC Juke certified as an "Internet Blues Library" -- then the juke could could get copies of all the full selections:

Hmmm... wouldn't that be swell....

Offline jharris

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Alan Lomax Recordings
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2010, 04:16:28 PM »
While doing some research for a couple of upcoming shows on Alan Lomax (I'll be interviewing author John Zwed about his new Lomax biography) I came across some unreleased recordings. I found these at the Cultural Equity site which is devoted to Lomax. I did a genre search under blues and found some sides, that as far as I know, have not been issued before. Here's the link.

For example, I've always been a fan of John Dudley who was recorded by Lomax in 1959 at Parchman Farm. The Blues Discography 1943-1970 lists three songs but on the site there are three additional songs and a short interview. There seems to be a number of other unreleased sides by other artists including a few by Forrest City Joe.

Offline Pan

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Re: Alan Lomax Recordings
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2010, 05:02:34 PM »
Thanks for the link, jharris.

And before anyone else makes a fool of himself, the link, is under the word "link", on Jeff's post!  :P

Cheers

Pan

Offline oddenda

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Re: Alan Lomax Recordings
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2010, 11:12:10 PM »
Jeff-

          It's spelled "SZWED"!! A very good man, a superior non-linear thinker, and a grand writer. What more can I say!! His book on Sun Ra is magnificent... he's also a great guy.

Peter B.

Offline jostber

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Re: Alan Lomax Recordings
« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2011, 01:21:51 PM »
A great interview with John Szwed here on the latest Big Road Blues Radio show from 23.01:

http://sundayblues.org/feeds/brb_1.23.mp3



 


Offline jmorton

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Re: Alan Lomax Recordings
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2011, 01:14:13 PM »
I've probably not heard most of Alan Lomax's taped audio, but I'd like to recommend Rounder's reissue of the Jelly Roll Morton Library of Congress tapes.  This was a 12 LP set that fits onto 8 CDs.  You might consider doing what I did, and ask your library to buy the set.

It thrills me just to hear the voice and piano of a man who was playing in New Orleans at the very birth of jazz and blues.  There is a mix of playing, singing, storytelling and description, prompted by A.L.'s curiosity about what things were like in the old days.  Jelly gets a bad rap for being a liar and taking false credit for inventing jazz, etc. - don't be put off by this.  Lomax found the perfect subject in this guy, and made a milestone of oral history.
http://www.rounder.com/artist/music/default.aspx?pid=61530&aid=97269

John Morton
www.jmorton.us

 


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