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My personal vision of the banjo starts with a .22 and a groundhog - Walt Koken

Author Topic: Introductions: When the Roll is called...  (Read 155501 times)

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Offline ssellars

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #180 on: September 21, 2005, 06:13:18 AM »
Hello. Another new member from Raleigh NC. Having grown up in New Orleans, I'm constanly surprised by the depth of great music here in the Triangle NC area.

I'm a beginner blues guitar player, having taken some lessons from a great young local player, Tad Walters, and now trying to slog through some of Stefan Grossman's instructional dvds. I really enjoy the jukebox, and listening to a range of music from old New Orleans jazz, country and ragtime blues, through electric Chicago blues to some of the rawer hill country blues. It's all good!

Hello to Andy. Let me know when you guys are heading over to the blues jam here. I'd love to meet up.

Thanks. Stephen

arbarnhart

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #181 on: September 21, 2005, 06:25:19 AM »
Stephen,

I PM'ed you about emailing me for some specific local info. Have you found the local blues org?

http://www.triangleblues.com/

Right on the front page is an add for the Bluesfest downtown (such as it is  ;)  but that's one of the things I like about "Rawlee") on Oct 1st. I am planning to go to that. I am not really very good yet, but I jam with a couple of neighbors who are very good.

-Andy

Offline Slack

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #182 on: September 21, 2005, 06:52:15 AM »
Welcome Stehpen and Andy!

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #183 on: September 21, 2005, 08:09:37 AM »
Welcome fellars!

LosFossil

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #184 on: October 06, 2005, 05:06:38 PM »
Well, I have lurked for a short time and registered today.  I'm John, I'm 55, and I live in Seattle.  I used to play autoharp and guitar when I was a Montessori teacher.  At that point, I had lots of buddies, mostly other guitarists. and we would get together and play fairly regularly.  As my job and location changed, I lost playing partners and stopped playing.  Twenty years later, one of the lost guys moves to Spokane (about 6 hours away).  HE had kept playing all these years, and besides being an accomplished player, is very generous with time and help.  [I should insert here that our wives like each other, etc.]  So, I started playing again about 2 years ago.

I was told my old Takamine would take ~$200-300 to fix, so I bought a Martin DM which I love dearly.  Then a year later, my Dad told me to take his old Martin--he was not using it any more; this was about 8 months before his death.  It is a 0018 (?), smaller than the DM, from 1952, with some playing scratches and such, but a wonderful balanced tone and surprising volume.  (It is a much better guitar than I am a player!)

I confess to not listening only to Country Blues, though I have been playing the Juke quite a bit.  I like Gillian Welch (and especially David Rawling's playing), and David Lindley, who is pretty hard to put in a category, and the Kitchen Syncopaters...

Thanks to all for a great site and the Juke!

Offline Slack

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #185 on: October 06, 2005, 06:55:05 PM »
Welcome LosFossil!

Gald you found your guitar again..  and don't feel guilty about listening to other stuff - I think we all do.  :P  However, you are so close to Seattle that you have no excuse NOT to attend the Port Townsend workshop.

Cheers,
slack

Offline Byron_L

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #186 on: October 10, 2005, 09:31:18 PM »
Hello Folks,

I thought, since I've taken to lurking in your neighborhood, I'd best introduce myself.

I'm a 42 year old factory worker from KY.? I've played Spanish classical since around '98 and really hit a hard limit a couple of years ago.? I practiced everyday and saw no improvement.? I kept asking, "What does it feel like to really 'Play'?"? Finally, after much soul searching,? I decided I wasn't 'connecting' with the music.? Technically I could get through the pieces, but I just didn't care.

I continued playing, only I limited it music based on Latin folk rhythms, music I really liked.? Also, during my self discovery period, I re-discovered (here's where you guys come in) my love of ragtime and country blues.?

My first every memory of country blues was a couple of an early George Thorogood tracks? (John Hardy and Wanted Man).? I listened to a lot of electric blues from that period.? For years I could only catch an occasion glimpse of the "good stuff".? I'd hear Leon Redbone and think, "D*mn, thats a cool sound."?

'Till finally I've been saved by the internet.

I've picked up a cheap steel string (Hohner HF-75 12-clear slothead) that seems serviceable and am working on integrating what I already know with the acoustic guitar.? The are alot of similarities and a lot of differences, but all I really know is that I have awakened an ache to play.

Gosh, I feel like I jut stood up at an AA meeting.? " Hello.? My name is Byron and I'm a country-rag Weenie."

Regards,? Byron
« Last Edit: October 10, 2005, 09:45:01 PM by Byron_L »

Offline waxwing

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #187 on: October 11, 2005, 12:15:52 AM »
Welcome to Weenie, Byron. That's a great story. Fire away with any questions you may have for source and learning materials.

We make a big effort here to get over the hump of learning to recognize what is being played by ear, but it's fine to start out with tab or other formats. You might want to try downloading John Miller's free lesson teaching a couple of Ed bell's strangely beautiful tunes in E. Look in the thread on Online Audio Lessons.

With your skills from classical playing you shouldn't have too much difficulty making the transition to country blues. Changing your hand position to allow you to damp the bass strings at the bridge with the heel of your hand, and loosening up your grip so that you can wrap your left thumb around to fret the bass string are the two major changes, but you are probably already aware of those?

All for now.
John C.
"People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it."
George Bernard Shaw

http://www.youtube.com/user/WaxwingJohn
https://www.facebook.com/WaxwingJohn

Willie Brown's Liquor at CD Baby

Offline Slack

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #188 on: October 11, 2005, 07:00:47 AM »
Welcome Byron - thanks for de-lurking!

Offline Byron_L

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #189 on: October 11, 2005, 09:13:45 AM »
Thanks for the welcomes.

John...You folks have been answering my questions for quite a bit now thanks the search function!  The expertise here is amazing.  But, I'll try to play an active role.

I have two of John M's lesson in mind (not including the ear training session).  I still have the guitar on my left leg, although it is sinking lower and more parallel.  I'm trying to just take it easy.  My main concerns are to get a grip on the fundamentals and listening (listening,listening).

Thanks again.
Byron

Offline waxwing

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #190 on: October 11, 2005, 11:01:35 AM »
No reason to change your guitar position. Left leg is where I play mine, as do many around here, even John M. Far better for your posture. I was having medial nerve issues (a component of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) and was advised to switch to the "Classical" position to get better posture. Really helped.

All for now.
John C.
"People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it."
George Bernard Shaw

http://www.youtube.com/user/WaxwingJohn
https://www.facebook.com/WaxwingJohn

Willie Brown's Liquor at CD Baby

Offline Doc Brainerd

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #191 on: October 21, 2005, 02:33:02 PM »
Greetings and Salutations,

I've been listening to WC on a regular basis for about the last year and feel it's finally time to emerge from lurker status. I've really enjoyed the music and the discourse going on in the forums. I thought I'd take this opportunity to briefly share my own personal history and path to Weenie-dom.

I suppose the genesis of my interests in the blues is similar to many others out there: I took a couple months of guitar as a kid, but gave it up because of slow progress and other competing interests. Got into hard rock as teenager with an emphasis on Led Zeppelin, the Stones, Hendrix, and the Doors. The music of those bands sparked an interest in blues greats like Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, and Elmore James. Music remained a casual interest while I  went to school and found a career and started a family. Having finally become more settled in life I decided I wanted to pick up the guitar again (essentially, starting from square one, having retained no ability from previous lessons). During this time I had also acquired the Robert Johnson boxed set, which in turn prompted an exploration of the works of Skip James, Son House, and Charley Patton. I had always enjoyed acoustic roots-type music and was intrigued by the possibility of learning some of the songs that so influenced the electric blues and rock I had been listening to during my young adulthood. My progress in developing any decent guitarskills has been pretty slow but steady. I've learned a handful of songs from one of Steve James' instructional books (Crow Jane, Take Me Back, Sugar Babe) as well as some Mississippi John Hurt songs via Happy Traum's DVD. Visits to the forum to eavesdrop on the discussions have kept me motivated in hopes developing an 'ear' for the music and become less reliant on mechanical rote memorization.

I don't remember exactly how or when I found Weenie Campbell - it was probably via websearch for  lyrics or TABs - but have turned several friends and relatives to Juke Radio since then. It's great to have access to a community with such devotion to this cool, fun music and to be able to hear some of this great rare music while I work (and surf the web).

I'm definitely interested in hearing from other members of this forum who might be in my neck of the woods (mid-central Minnesota - Brainerd area).

Looking forward to more great music and good cheer from WC and community.
Greg

Offline Slack

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #192 on: October 21, 2005, 02:45:27 PM »
Welcome Greg!  Thanks for coming out of lurkdom.  If folks start posting their pins to the Member Map -- maybe it will be easy to locate someone in your neck of the woods.  Otherwise, Port Townsend is a great way to ramp up your enthusiasm and connect with other players.

Cheers,
slack

Offline Doc Brainerd

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #193 on: October 21, 2005, 03:12:55 PM »
Slack,
Thanks for the prompt welcome. Definitely plan to take attend PT in the future. I've got a long way to go, though, before I'm willing to inflict my musicianship on the general public. I'm giving myself a 2-3 year timeline. By the way, what is the web address that would get me more info on PT?
Greg

boots

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #194 on: October 22, 2005, 02:03:16 PM »

 


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