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A great piece. Guitar all but inaudible. Raw Sludge. Literally fantastic. They were probably street singers who sang lots of songs about happenings in the news. Wish we could hear news like this now - John Fahey, on William and Versey Smith, When That Great Ship Went Down

Author Topic: Open G - origins in the blues  (Read 1251 times)

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Offline waxwing

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Re: Open G - origins in the blues
« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2019, 03:07:54 PM »
I was posting out of amusement, Stuart, not to dredge up some old argument. I guess my point was that a musician of the era would have been more likely to call it "Spanish" than "Open" anything. But, as I mentioned earlier, folkies from the '50s-'60s, of which David Evans was one, used the tuning, and the name "Open G", ubiquitously, regardless of pitch.

Wax
"People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it."
George Bernard Shaw

“Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't after you.”
Joseph Heller, Catch-22

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Offline Stuart

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  • "The Voice of Almiqui"
Re: Open G - origins in the blues
« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2019, 03:25:05 PM »
Hi Wax:

No argument at all, here. I was referring to your Son House / Lomax recollection and that even though you couldn't locate it, you might be remembering it correctly.

As for "amusement," I mistyped "assuming" and auto-corrected (auto-mis-corrected??) it to "amusing" before I caught it in the preview. You were probably auto-correcting me from afar. Strange things happen in this world...

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