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She had this [barbecue pit] piled up full of hickory. She comes out with this two gallon can of gasoline & she up-ends this thing over the hickory... As she walks away from the pit she takes a kitchen match, strikes it on her butt, throws it over her shoulder, causes an explosion 30 feet into the air. Then she walked by and said: 'Be ready'n about an hour...' - Steve James, Port Townsend 97

Author Topic: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys  (Read 7695 times)

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Offline frankie

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Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« on: February 18, 2005, 01:34:00 PM »
The following is John Miller's list of Papa Charlie Jackson songs and keys that used to be hosted on my website and was originally posted to the weenie Yahoo group quite a few years ago, now. In the long run, this is probably a better home for this.  The complete posting violated the 15000 character limit, so I broke it up into three separate posts:

Quote from: Johnm
The songs are presented in the order they're found on the three Document CDs.  The following tables include: track, title, recording date, position played, and concert pitch of the recording.  If he is sharp of the concert key, I will indicate "s" after the key name, if flat, I will indicate "f" after the key name.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2006, 06:39:29 PM by frankie »

Offline frankie

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Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys: Volume 1
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2006, 06:40:58 PM »
Track
Title
Month
Year
Position
Pitch
1.
Papa's Lawdy Lawdy Blues
August
1924
E standard
Concert E
2.
Airy Man Blues
August
1924
D standard
Concert D
3.
Salt Lake City Blues (Take 2)
September
1924
A standard
Concert A
4.
Salty Dog Blues (Take 2)
September
1924
G standard
Concert G
5.
The Cat's got the Measles
January
1925
C standard
Concert C
6.
I Got What It Takes, But It Breaks My Heart To Give It Away
January
1925
G standard
Concert F#
7.
Shave 'em Dry (Take 2)
February
1925
E standard
Concert E
8.
Coffee Pot Blues
February
1925
E standard
Concert E
9.
Mister Man, Part I (Take 2) (w/Ida Cox)
April
1925
G standard
Concert F#
10.
Mister Man, Part II (w/Ida Cox)
April
1925
G standard
Concert F#
11.
Shake That Thing (Take 2)
May
1925
D standard
Concert D
12.
The Faking Blues (Take 2)
May
1925
E standard
Concert E
13.
I'm Alabama Bound (unidentified 2nd banjo)
May
1925
G standard
Concert A flat
14.
Drop that Sack (unidentified 2nd banjo)
May
1925
A standard
Concert A flat
15.
Hot Papa Blues (Take 2)
August
1925
A standard
Concert A
16.
Take Me Back Blues
August
1925
D standard
Concert D
17.
Mama don't Allow It
August
1925
G standard
Concert F# s
18.
Mama, Don't You Think I Know (Take 2)
August
1925
C standard
Concert C
19.
How Long, Daddy, How Long (w/Ida Cox)
September
1925
C standard
Concert Bflat, (Ida Cox, Bflat s)
20.
Maxwell Street Blues
September
1925
E standard
Concert E
21.
All I Want Is A Spoonful
September
1925
C standard
concert C s
22.
I'm Going Where The Chilly Winds Don't Blow (Take 2)
December
1925
G standard
Concert G
23.
Texas Blues (Take 1), (high-strung guitar)
December
1925
E standard
Concert D
24.
Texas Blues (Take 2), as above
December
1925
E standard
Concert D
25.
I'm Tired Of Fooling Around with You
January
1926
A standard
Concert A f
26.
Jackson's Blues (guitar)
January
1926
A standard
Concert G
27.
Let's Get Along
February
1926
D standard
Concert D
« Last Edit: March 30, 2006, 06:43:42 PM by frankie »

Offline frankie

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Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys: Volume 2
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2006, 06:45:47 PM »
Track
Title
Month
Year
Position
Pitch
1.
Mumsy Mumsy Blues
February
1926
E standard
Concert E
2.
Butter and Egg Man blues
February
1926
G standard
Concert G
3.
The Judge Cliff Davis Blues
April/May
1926
G standard
Concert F#
4.
Up the Way Bound (Take 1) (guitar)
April/May
1926
D standard
Concert D
5.
Up the Way Bound (Take 2) as above
April/May
1926
D standard
Concert B
6.
Four Eleven Fourty-four
April/May
1926
B flat standard
Concert A
7.
Your Baby Ain't Sweet Like Mine
May/June
1926
C standard
Concert B flat s
8.
Bad Luck Woman Blues
May/June
1926
C standard
Concert B flat
9.
Salty Dog (Take 2)
September
1926


10.
Gay Cattin'
September
1926
D standard
Concert C# f
11.
Fat Mouth blues
November
1926
G standard
Concert G
12.
She Belongs to Me Blues
May
1927
F standard
Concert F
13.
Coal Man Blues (unidentified 2nd banjo)
May
1927
G standard
Concert G
14.
Skoodle Um Skoo
July
1927
B flat standard
Concert B f
15.
Sheik of Displaines Street
July
1927
G standard
Concert A flat
16.
Look Out Papa, Don't Tear Your Pants
October
1927
A minor/C standard
Concert A minor/C
17.
Baby, Don't You Be So Mean
October
1927
E standard
Concert E
18.
Bright Eyes
November
1927
C standard
Concert B s
19.
Blue Monday Morning Blues
November
1927
C standard
Concert B s
20.
Long Gone, Lost John
January
1928
C standard
Concert C# f
21.
I'm Looking for A Woman Who Knows How To Treat Me Right
January
1928
C standard
Concert C# f
22.
Ash Tray Blues
May
1928
E flat Standard
Concert E flat f
23.
No Need of Knockin' On The Blind
May
1928
G standard
Concert A flat f
24.
I Like to Love My Baby
May
1928
G standard
Concert G s
25.
Baby, Papa Needs His Lovin'
May
1928
E standard
Concert Halfway between E and F
26.
Lexington, Kentucky Blues
September
1928
D standard
Concert E flat f

Offline frankie

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Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys: Volume 3
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2006, 06:49:17 PM »
Track
Title
Month
Year
Position
Pitch
1.
Good Doing Papa Blues
September
1928
E standard
Concert F
2.
Ma and Pa Poorhouse Blues (w/Ma Rainey)
October
1928
F standard
concert F f
3.
Big Feeling Blues (w/Ma Rainey)
October
1928
F standard
Concert F f
4.
Jungle Man Blues
December
1928
A standard
Concert A f
5.
Corn Liquor Blues
December
1928
F standard
Concert E s
6.
Don't Break Down On Me
January
1929
D standard
Concert D
7.
Baby, Please Loan Me Your Heart
January
1929
B flat standard
Concert B flat
8.
Dentist Chair Blues, Part I (guitar, w/Hattie McDaniels & pianist)
March
1929
E standard
Concert E flat s
9.
Dentist Chair blues, Part II
March
1929
E standard
Concert E flat s
10.
Hot Papa Blues, no.2 (guitar)
March
1929
A standard
Concert A flat s
11.
We Can't Buy It No More (guitar)
March
1929
D standard
Concert C# s
12.
Tailor Made Lover
July
1929
A standard
Concert F# f
13.
Take Me Back Blues, no. 2 (guitar)
July
1929
D standard
Concert B f
14.
Taint What You Do, But How You Do It
September
1929
E standard
Concert E flat
15.
Forgotten Blues
September
1929
A standard
Concert A flat
16.
Papa Do Do Blues
September
1929
C standard
Concert C#
17.
I'll Be Gone, Babe
September
1929
G standard
Concert A flat
18.
Papa Charlie and Blind Blake Talk About It, Part I
September
1929
C standard
Concert C
19.
Papa Charlie and Blind Blake Talk About It, Part II
September
1929
C standard
Concert C
20.
You Got that Wrong (guitar)
May
1930
G standard
Concert G
21.
Self Experience (guitar)
May
1930
G standard
Concert G f
22.
Skoodle Um Skoo
November
1934
B flat standard
Concert A s
23.
If I Got What You Want
November
1934
C standard
Concert B f
24.
What's That thing She's Shaking
November
1934
G standard
Concert G
25.
You Put It In, I'll Take It Out
November
1934
C standard
Concert C

Quote from: Johnm
Notes:

Jackson's Blues (Volume 1, 26):  In many ways sounds more like G standard than A standard, and it is pitched at G.  the only problem is he hits a low root of the V chord in the intro and the solo, which makes G standard impossible.  I suppose he could be in the DGDGBE tuning, but I don't think he used it.  The strings sound slack like A tuned low.  This is a really tough identification.

Up the Way Bound (Take 2)  (Volume 2, 5):  Record is defective.

Salty Dog (Take 2) (Volume 2, 9):  Vocal only.

Hot Papa Blues, no.2 (Volume 3, 10):  Another really tough identification, in some ways it sounds like G standard, but the IV chord sounds like a D chord, not a C chord to me.  It lacks the low third you have in C on the fourth string.  I can think of no other player in this genre who makes differentiating between his playing in G and A standard so difficult.  Normally it's a piece of cake telling the difference.

Take Me Back Blues, no. 2 (Volume 3, 13):  Pitch is not incorrect, he is tuned this low by design, sounds like Rabbit Brown, even the same right hand flamencoey stuff.  Fascinating!

Papa Charlie has some interesting chordal idiosyncracies.  When he plays a I-VI-II-V progression in C, he will often play a D minor chord rather than a G7 chord where the V chord would normally fall in the progression.  He does the same thing in D tunes, where he will go to an E or E7 out of the D shape, and then, rather than resolving to the A7, he'll go to an E minor before resolving to D.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2008, 08:36:06 PM by Johnm »

Offline Flatd7

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2006, 10:50:44 AM »
Professor Miller or other Weeenies

I've become obsessed with Charlie Jackson and Alabama Bound in particular. I can pick up the progression fairly easily but how does he achieve this sound? The notes on this page suggest standard tuning, Key of G. What inversions are he playing? It sounds like he's up the neck about midway, but it doesn't sound right. Any clues to this tune would be great.

I don't suppose there's and printed material on Papa Charlie's repertoire, is there?

Offline Johnm

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2006, 01:45:21 PM »
Hi Jon,
I am not home now, but when I get there I will give it a listen and post what I find.  Being obsessed with Papa Charlie Jackson is an indication of good taste from my point of view.  I am not aware of any published transcriptions of his playing.
all best,
Johnm

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2006, 08:14:12 AM »
I haven't played along or listened repeatedly yet, but I'm wondering if the second banjo on I'm Alabama Bound is throwing you off. There is one there, playing higher register notes/chords, that is barely audible at times. It's actually hard to tell what kind of banjo it is to my ear. Could be a banjo-mando even. The Document discographical info simply says "unknown 2nd banjo." Does anyone know if B&GR has different information? It's a bit more audible on the subsequent tune, Drop That Sack.

I could speculate irresponsibly about Papa Charlie playing xxx553 and/or xx0775 positions for IV and V chords in G (those C barre partials where you can then reach for the upper register 7ths on the 6th and 8th frets respectively), but have not checked with this song. Really pure unsubstantiated guessing so far!

I agree with JohnM. A Papa Charlie obsession is a clear sign of good character. He is one of the truely neglected greats. I'm not aware of any published material and would be flabbergasted to find it. Perhaps in some of those older Grossman books but I doubt it.

Offline frankie

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2006, 09:43:39 AM »
Sounds to me like the recording has a really loud tenor banjo on it, obscuring a lot of what PCJ is doing.  If the tb was tuned to CGDA (std tuning for tb), to play along with PCJ in the key of G, the player would probably play a G like this:

A - 2nd fret
D - 5th fret
G - 4th fret
C - 2nd fret

or some permutation of that.  Mandolin players will recognize this as a D chord, since the tb is similarly tuned in fifths, but to C instead og G.  The note on the 1st (A) string is a B, and would make it sound like a guitar was playing figures in the middle of the neck.


rbuniv

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2006, 10:09:06 AM »
Hello;

Just listened to "Alabama Bound" and "Drop That Sack". Sounds to me like a 5 string banjo played in a classical style somewhat like that of early Rag Time pickers Fred Van Epps or Vess l. Ossman. If you listen to Charlie Poole, Uncle Dave Macon, Gus Cannon or any number of other early banjo players (who play finger style), you will hear the influence of these early players and some of the same kind of syncopation as played by the second banjo in these two numbers. If you don't have a banjo, you can tune your guitar to open G, play an F shape G chord at the second fret and bar for C and D chords at the fifth and seventh frets respectively, you can also play the F shape up the neck for the C and D also a banjo D chord in the same manner. Also sounds as though the instruments are tuned a half step high from pitch, try a capo on the first fret.

RB

Offline Johnm

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2006, 10:55:59 AM »
Hi Jon,
I just listened to "Alabamy Bound", and Papa Charlie is playing banjo-guitar in standard tuning, G position, (relative to capo placement/tuning) with the second instrument a tenor banjo played as in Frankie's scenario, I believe.  I believe both instruments are being flat-picked.  Papa Charlie's intro is like so, with the extra vertical marks showing how many beats he holds each chord in the bars where there are more than one chord played.

   |    G    |    G7    |    C    |    Edim7    |
                  ||  ||     ||  ||    |   |    ||   
   |    G    |  A7/D7  | G/D7  | G/D7/ G    |

Behind his singing, he does this:

   |    G    |    G    |    C    |    C    |
     ||   ||   ||   ||
   |  D/C   |  D/C   |    G    |    G    |

The solo is so:

   |    G    |    G7    |    C    |    Edim7    |

   |    G    |     G     |    D    |    D          |

   |    G     |    G7    |    C    |    Edim7    |

   |    G    |  A7/D7  |  G/D7  | G/D7/G    |

The out solo follows the same progression as the sung verses.  The E diminished 7 is the same as a G diminished 7, voiced on the top four strings:  X-X-2-3-2-3.  I just call it an E diminished 7 since diminished 7 chords are usually named by their lowest voice in pitch.  I hope this helps. 
All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: December 07, 2006, 08:55:32 AM by Johnm »

Offline Bunker Hill

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2006, 01:28:29 PM »
I agree with JohnM. A Papa Charlie obsession is a clear sign of good character. He is one of the truely neglected greats. I'm not aware of any published material and would be flabbergasted to find it. Perhaps in some of those older Grossman books but I doubt it.
Over the decades various stabs have been made at writing "generically" about PCG but I guess the most overtly "musicological" have been the sleevenotes to the Yazoo and Biograph LPs of the mid-70s. The Jackson entry in Robert Ford's forthcoming revised blues bibliography has 25 entries (mostly encyclopedias) however one is "Papa Charlie Jackson on Wax" written by Max Jones and Rex Harris and published in the Melody Maker, 20 July 1946. Yes 1946...not a typo

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2006, 02:00:53 PM »
I agree with JohnM. A Papa Charlie obsession is a clear sign of good character. He is one of the truely neglected greats. I'm not aware of any published material and would be flabbergasted to find it. Perhaps in some of those older Grossman books but I doubt it.
Over the decades various stabs have been made at writing "generically" about PCG but I guess the most overtly "musicological" have been the sleevenotes to the Yazoo and Biograph LPs of the mid-70s. The Jackson entry in Robert Ford's forthcoming revised blues bibliography has 25 entries (mostly encyclopedias) however one is "Papa Charlie Jackson on Wax" written by Max Jones and Rex Harris and published in the Melody Maker, 20 July 1946. Yes 1946...not a typo

Yes, I was speaking specifically of published music transcriptions of some kind, which is what I thought Jon was alluding to. Good to know someone's written about him though! There are numerous references in Oliver's Songsters and Saints as well.

For those interested in Papa Charlie, there's a little information plus some tunes to listen to at the redhotjazz site: http://www.redhotjazz.com/jackson.html.


rbuniv

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2006, 03:15:36 PM »
Hi John;

After reading your last post I had to listen again and again to Alabama Bound to see just what it was that I thought I was hearing. What I don't hear at all are the bottom two notes of a guitar Which PCJ is usually quite generous with.Could it be that he was playing either a plectrum or a 5 string banjo on this recording and was backed by a tenor banjo or am I missing something? Been listening to Papa Charlie Jackson for some 30 years and worked out allot of his songs,  (not much recently),"even bought a six string banjo"; guess its time to time to dust him off again.

RB

Offline Johnm

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2006, 03:31:40 PM »
Hi rb,
As far as I know, Papa Charlie only ever recorded on banjo-guitar and six-string guitar.  I agree "Alabamy Bound" is hard to hear, but all the treble movement is pretty clear.  "Drop That Sack", which was recorded at the same session, has very active bass work which could only have been played on a banjo-guitar of the various instruments that have been suggested.  I reckon Papa Charlie was flat-picking a banjo-guitar with a heavy concentration on the treble.  Five-string banjo and plectrum banjos are really different animals than banjo-guitar.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Flatd7

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2006, 03:49:52 PM »
WOW! John, thanks so much.

I'm running to a gig tonight, but I will get to this in the AM. (Maybe in the early AM if I can't sleep after my gig)

The part that gets me is the kind of decending part on the second half of the vocal. You have it marked as D/C l D/C. I'll check it out soon!

rbuniv

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2006, 04:13:32 PM »
Hello john;

Maybe I'm off on a tangent but I think this is significant. I truly believe that Papa Charlie did in fact record using instruments other than guitar-banjo or guitar. Very little information is available to substantiate this However after listening again to all of his recorded material it is clear to me that he played some of his pieces on a four (or maybe five) string instrument. On the song "You Put It In, I'll Take It Out" I don't hear the lower two notes of a guitar, when I tried playing along with this selection on guitar it made no sense not two use the bottom two strings. Considering that Papa Charlie was born sometime between 1885 and 1890, 30 years before Gibson produced its first guitar-banjo in 1919 suggests to me that he was first a banjo player (probably a 5 string which is what was popular in his youth) before he gravitated to the guitar. Give a listen to "Papa Charlie And Blind Blake Talk About It" Part 1 & 2, If that isn't a ukulele, (banjo-uke or national-uke) that Papa Charlie is playing  I'll eat my raccoon coat!

RB

Offline Johnm

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2006, 10:30:20 PM »
Hello RB,
On "You Put It In, I'll Take It Out", I can hear the root of the C chord at the third fret of the fifth string and the root of the A7 chord on the open fifth string (relative to his tuning).  The piece sounds pretty plainly to me to be played in C position standard tuning on a banjo-guitar.  The only version I have been able to hear of "Papa Charlie and Blind Blake Talk About It" is so whupped that I don't feel confident making any kind of identification, but on the version I heard, Papa Charlie's instrument was heavily weighted toward the treble and high--if it was a banjo-guitar it was either capoed high or being played with closed position chords up the neck, which would not have posed a problem for Papa Charlie.  It may be a banjo uke or banjo mandolin.

I was not aware that anyone knew birth dates for Papa Charlie.  According to the Document CDs, he is pretty much of a biographical cipher, with almost nothing known about him.  I don't think there is anything in his playing on banjo-guitar or guitar that suggests he started out as a five-string banjo player.  They are really very different instruments.  There is nothing that I've heard him play that utilizes a drone string in the way that the fifth string of the banjo is most characteristically used.  I don't see the logic of a person playing all banjo family instruments because they play one instrument in the family.  Without more evidence in the sound on the records, I think it's a stretch to say that Papa Charlie used a five-string banjo for any of his recordings, particularly since his trademark instrument was the banjo-guitar.  I haven't heard anything in his solo pieces that I can't hear naturally and fit on a guitar or banjo-guitar.
All best,
Johnm 

rbuniv

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2006, 05:48:01 AM »
Hi John;

Perhaps it's that one and only photograph of Papa Charlie with his six string banjo that clouds our thinking on this matter.

According to Bruce Eder, All Music Guide listed at "http://www.answers.com/topic/papa-charlie-jackson" Papa Charlie played guitar, banjo and ukulele which is an instrument first introduced to this country around 1898. A soprano uke is tuned the same as the top four strings of a guitar at the seventh fret, a tenor uke is tuned D G B E just like a guitar, both with the fourth string being an octave higher. I am aware of the difference between banjos, guitars and ukuleles, their tunings and chord structures as I play all three. I don't find it much of a stretch to think PC was a banjo player as a common tuning on 5 string banjo is open G, the same as the top four strings on an open G tuning on guitar. The strings are tuned D G B D so that the only difference between that and standard tuning on guitar is that the the first string has been lowered one step from E to D. Using an F shape chord (same as guitar) and barre chords one can easily play in any key using these chords up and down the neck. Listen to Gus Cannon (playing five string banjo), you wont hear that  fifth string drone much in his playing. In various biographies I have read over the years, I find it was quite common that many guitar playing bluesmen had cut their teeth on the 5 string banjo. The banjo  was the instrument of the time! Some of the earliest commercial sound recordings were of the 5 string banjo; Vess L. Ossman recorded in the early 1890s and Fred Van Epps recorded in 1897 a good 25 to30 years before Papa Charlie and others walked into the studio. I am certain that these two performers and others of the time who did and did not record were of great influence to subsequent players who aspired to be performers. Certainly these white performers (the guys who were making money) were an inspiration to aspiring young musicians both black and white; I remember reading that Robert Johnson listened to and admired Bing Crosby.
 
RB

Offline Johnm

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2006, 07:05:20 PM »
Hi all,
Incidentally, I have been reviewing all the key/position identifications I did previously on the Papa Charlie Jackson recordings, and have found an identification error I made on Volume 3.  I had identified Papa Charlie's playing of "Tailor Made Lover", recorded in Chicago in July, 1929 as being out of G position in standard tuning, pitched around F#.  In fact, Papa Charlie played the tune of A position in standard tuning, pitched around F#.  At a couple of points in the course of the rendition, you can hear Papa Charlie sliding from a low V note (open E string) up to the I note, likewise played on an open string (open A string).  Had he played the piece in G standard tuning as I previously identified, the low V note would not have been available.  Also, "Tailor Made Lover" is played on a guitar as was "Take Me Back Blues No. 2", recorded at the same session.  "Take Me Back Blues No. 2" is played out of a D position in standard tuning, sounding in B.  The re-identification of Tailor Made Lover" has both songs sounding approximately a minor third below the position in which they were played, which makes the tuning consistent for the session, at which only the two tunes were done.
All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: December 14, 2006, 08:02:21 AM by Johnm »

Offline Slack

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2006, 09:47:57 PM »
Quote
I would like to apologize to the entire Weenie community and to RB in particular

John, you are such a thoughtful guy -- I wouldn't be too hard on yourself, I figured you were just having a 'bad hair' day - which we all do from time to time.  Sometimes the tone of internet posts don't quite come out like we want and I always think it is best to give folks the benefit of the doubt in that regard.  So, hang in there, really big of you to apologize  - a rarely seen event it seems!

rbuniv

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2006, 06:38:39 AM »
Hello John;

Thank you for your consideration and apology! I enjoy entering into these discussions, especially the ones that can heat up a little with people sharing their own opinions. When something is unknown, we are left only to our opinions or surrounding evidence on which we can build and voice our theories. I think this is good because it inspires thought, research and interaction among the comunity. Best if we can agree or agree to disagree without taking it to a personal level.

John;I truly appreciate all your contributions to this site and look forward to future discussions.

RB

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Papa Charlie Jackson - songs and keys
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2006, 07:32:06 AM »
I'm just glad we've got people at WeenieCampbell like frankie, banjochris, RB and JohnM who can talk -- and argue occasionally -- intelligently about banjos of various kinds. Something I personally cannot do.


 


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