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William Grant, [born in 1908], was born near Pittsview, Alabama...He was given a harmonica one Christmas, and he says he learned how to play it while sitting on a plow in the fields. 'I played at parties in the countries,' he said. 'I used to pick guitar, but I come to religion and I put the guitar down. I promised the Lord I wouldn't fool with a guitar no more, but I didn't promise Him I wouldn't fool with a harp. I always keep a harp' - George Mitchell, from In Celebration of a Legacy: The Traditional Arts of the Lower Chattahoochee Valley http://southernspaces.org/2004/blues-lower-chattahoochee-valley

Author Topic: Sam Charters film The Blues  (Read 3060 times)

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Offline daddystovepipe

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Re: Sam Charters film The Blues
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2019, 10:59:12 AM »
I asked Gary Atkinson of Document Records an update for the movie "The Blues" by Sam Charters.  Here's his reply :

The documentary film was finally completed in the autumn of last year. We are very pleased with the results.

It has been given the title of 'Searching For Secret Heroes - The Making Of A Film'. It is made up in two sections. The first is made up of interviews with Sam and Ann Charters discussion how, as a young couple in 1962 the ventured south with a wind up 16mm camera and a reel to reel tape recorder hoping to catch on film, for the first time, some of the "country blues" artists who could still be found and were still performing at their homes and locally. This section lasts for fifty-seven minutes ending with Sam and Ann describing what they had found in the segregated south of the time. As a young couple from the north, they were shocked yet they were also elated with what they had captured both on film and on the microphone. The remaining section is that of the entire film that they shot and which Sam simply called 'The Blues'.

We are now working on the notes and the album, which will accompany the DVD, which is due to be released at the end of this year.

Offline Stuart

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Offline jostber

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Re: Sam Charters film The Blues
« Reply #17 on: April 25, 2020, 04:26:35 PM »
I just ordered it! Hopefully it will be here soon.

Offline RobBob

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Re: Sam Charters film The Blues
« Reply #18 on: May 01, 2020, 12:49:12 PM »
I got mine and the interview with Sam is great, the whole package is great I recommend it.

Offline RobBob

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Re: Sam Charters film The Blues
« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2020, 05:43:22 AM »
Here are some more thoughts on this package.  I watched Sam Charterís film, THE BLUES made on a shoestring with the help of his wife, Ann. Iíd probably seen it before, much of it was familiar. The streets of Spartanburg, where some of this was shot, are not much different today in those nieghborhoods. The music is raw, powerful and has the full force of the blues behind it.  Blues are different for everyone, these are at my core of how I understand the blues. These are the first blues that drew me in with their raw power that cut to the bone of human pain. When I started out I had a guitar like they had, cheap, ladder braced and not always in tune. I had a middle class home, so it was much more that they would ever have.
I used to cut lunch in high school to read up on the blues and other folk forms. They had Samís book Country Blues in the library. I read it and everything else that was there.  I would hike to the bus stop, we lived a good ways out of town, and take the bus downtown to the large library there and find anything they had. I played my Silvertone guitar that I got in 1963 until the neck curled so bad that it was almost impossible to fret. Then I started to play it with a homemade slide.  All of these great, intense blues ruined me for the British groups that came along later, but the 1960ís were a great time of discovery. Glad to be transported back to those days so long ago. Ever since those days there have been discussions, arguments, and great tomes written about a music made by folks who often could not read and write. I find a lot of that ironic.

Another thing, Baby Tate talks about the difference between being mad and angry. Dogs get mad, we get angry.  I remember being told that as youngster
« Last Edit: May 02, 2020, 05:46:31 AM by RobBob »

Offline RobBob

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Re: Sam Charters film The Blues
« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2020, 06:12:12 AM »
One additional thought on this was how Henry Townsend jumped all over Moses Rascoe for not writing new material. Roscoe just played and sang the songs he loved. This devastated him and he could not imagine why Townsend would be so brutal. Townsend apparently was not very nice and highly egotistical.  Mose really loved Big Bill Broonzy's music and had a large stack of LPs without covers he would shift through and play on his record player.  Moses died in the 1990ís in his seventies. Born July 27, 1917 in Windsor, NC , Died  March 6, 1994 in Lebanon, PA. I played harp for him from the late 70ís until he got manager and they did not want me to travel with him. I held a job down the street from his house in the early 80ís and would stop by to see him when he was in town at lunch time.

 


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