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The preacher must get some sometime, just like any other man. - Bob Robinson, The Preacher Must Get Some Sometime

Author Topic: Hidden Treasures  (Read 5539 times)

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Offline Bunker Hill

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2008, 05:39:09 AM »
There have been discussions in the past, see if there is a Willie Doss TAG. In the meantime check out

http://www.wirz.de/music/dossfrm.htm

Bits and pieces of reading matter
Oh dear something seems to have got lost from this sentence which I think carried on along the lines of "...are included and double clicking on the Len Kunstadt review at the end will enlarge the graphic".

Offline Bunker Hill

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2008, 09:32:35 AM »
Here's another:
Joe Townsend (vocals, with a guitarist whose name escapes me) on the "God's Mighty Hand" compilation (Heritage HTCD 09). He has two great performances, recorded live in a church: "If I Could Not Say A Word" and "Going Over The Hill."
Yeah great 45, recorded live in a Memphis circa 1970 if memory serves correct and his only known recording. I assumed he accompanied himself. What do the notes of the CD say about him.

Offline jpeters609

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2008, 09:52:25 PM »
Right you are, Bunker Hill, regarding the date and place of Joe Townsend's recording. These are the liner notes concerning Joe Townsend from the "God's Mighty Hand" collection (written by Bob Laughton):

"This 1970 Memphis live recording caused considerable excitement amongst both blues and gospel collectors and was described at the time as a vocal in the Son House tradition with a delta style guitar. It was assumed that Townsend was the guitarist, but during the summer of 1973 he was tracked down working as a mechanic in Independence by Bengt Olsson who discovered that the guitarist was a Johnnie Mays. Bengt Olsson and friends were doing a series of field recordings around Memphis, many of which were issued on an early Flyright album, 'Southern Comfort Country' (FLY 501), including a further Townsend track."

I haven't heard the track referenced in these liner notes, and I don't know how Townsend's 1970 recordings came to be. But they are very fine!
Jeff

Offline Bunker Hill

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2008, 12:34:55 AM »
Right you are, Bunker Hill, regarding the date and place of Joe Townsend's recording. These are the liner notes concerning Joe Townsend from the "God's Mighty Hand" collection (written by Bob Laughton):

"This 1970 Memphis live recording caused considerable excitement amongst both blues and gospel collectors and was described at the time as a vocal in the Son House tradition with a delta style guitar. It was assumed that Townsend was the guitarist, but during the summer of 1973 he was tracked down working as a mechanic in Independence by Bengt Olsson who discovered that the guitarist was a Johnnie Mays. Bengt Olsson and friends were doing a series of field recordings around Memphis, many of which were issued on an early Flyright album, 'Southern Comfort Country' (FLY 501), including a further Townsend track."

I haven't heard the track referenced in these liner notes, and I don't know how Townsend's 1970 recordings came to be. But they are very fine!
Many thanks for the informative reply. I have a goodly number of Flyright LPs but not that, better check out Stefan's Flyright page to see what's what. In the early 70s Blues Unlimited spoke highly of the 45 making the Son House analogy telling readers it was available from J&F Record Sales in California. Until this topic I'd completely forgotten all about it.

For the discographically inclined it was originally issued on Designer 6885 (matrix Z4KM-6753/54) ;D

« Last Edit: December 13, 2008, 12:44:08 AM by Bunker Hill »

Offline uncle bud

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #19 on: December 18, 2008, 11:50:19 AM »
Ziegler performs "Bring It On Home To Me" amazingly.
Really. The 1961 Sam Cooke song or another similarly named?

Just a note to say the Ziegler performance goes under the title "If You Ever Change Your Mind".

Online Johnm

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #20 on: December 18, 2008, 12:58:54 PM »
Hi all,
I realized that my first post may have given the impression that only John Lee Ziegler and William "Do-Boy" Diamond qualified as talent deserving wider recognition on the George Mitchell Collection.  Far from it--Rosa Lee Hill was, I believe, one of the strongest woman singers and players ever to work in the Country Blues.  Her playing, in particular, was powerful in a way that is very rarely encountered, heavy, heavy time, extreme and long-held bends, a huge tone.  She must have been a very strong person. 
Another eye-opener for me on the set was the blind harmonica player and singer Robert Diggs.  On a set that abounds with excellent harmonica players, he stands out, with a beautiful tone on the harp, very controlled and relaxed bends (the two qualities don't often co-exist), and terrific singing.  Suffice to say that I don't think you have to be a harmonica aficionado to appreciate his tracks.
The religious singer James Shorter deserves a special nod, too.  I think, for the sound and evident conviction of his delivery he belongs in the company of people like Washington Phillips, Blind Willie Johnson, Rev. Pearly Brown and Alfred Karnes, and that's some pretty tall timber. 
All best,
Johnm

Offline oddenda

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #21 on: December 18, 2008, 05:25:51 PM »
We should ALL get on our knees and give a prayer of thanks for George Mitchell for all that he's given us over the decades.

Peter B.

Offline jpeters609

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #22 on: December 29, 2008, 09:45:03 PM »
And speaking of another George Mitchell-recorded "hidden tresaure," does anyone know if there was ever any follow-up interviews with, or research into, the Delta singer/guitarist Teddy Williams? I have just picked up the single-CD collection of his George Mitchell recordings (which are very fine) and was intrigued to hear a version of Son House's "My Black Mama" as well as Skip James' "Hard Times Killing Floor." Intriguing, to say the least. Clearly, Williams might have learned both tunes from 78 records, but he would have had to have access to two of the rarest releases of the era. Seems possible, at least, that he may have learned one or both of these tunes first-hand. At any rate, it would be interesting to hear what stories he had to tell. Did George Mitchell ever write more about him?
Jeff

Offline dj

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #23 on: January 20, 2009, 11:07:59 AM »
John Lee Ziegler just came on the Juke doing "Who's Gonna Be Your Man".  Very impressive.  I'm glad he got the chance to record, and sorry that his recorded legacy is so small.

Hearing stuff like this, that I'd heard about but never heard, is one of the great things about the Weenie Juke.  I guess I'll have to start saving my spare change to pick up the George Mitchell Collection.

Offline Coyote Slim

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #24 on: February 05, 2009, 04:10:34 PM »
I'm so glad the George Mitchell stuff is on the Juke and that the Juke is back up!  It entertains me as I do office work.
Puttin' on my Carrhartts, I gotta work out in the field.

Coyote Slim's Youtube Channel

Offline Laura

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2014, 11:30:50 AM »
 
Another musician who has made an impression on me this way is the singer Amelia Johnson, who appears on the CD, "Big Joe Williams and Friends--Going Back To Crawford", Arhoolie CD 9015.  Ms. Johnson does four songs on the CD, all accompanied by Big Joe:  "Checkin' Out", My Last Girl--Don't Treat Her Wrong!", "Can't Listen No More" and "Don't Stay Long".  Every one of the performances is spectacular; she sounds strong, serious, and has none of the commonly encountered "red hot mama" posturing.  She has the unmistakeable sound of someone who means what she is saying, and that is where the rubber meets the road in terms of this kind of singing, I think.  She sounded youngish at the time she was recorded, in 1971.  She could be an exciting influence at an event like Port Townsend if she is still around and still singing.
Amelia Johnson..just wow.  I meant to listen carefully to "Going Back To Crawford" since I really liked the record on the first listen through.  However Amelia's tracks are on constant repeat when I put this on - can't get enough of her singing!!
With a voice like that, surely she must have recorded something else?


Online Johnm

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2014, 12:29:48 PM »
Those are great performances by her aren't they, Laura?  I'm glad you found her.  Those would be good ones to transcribe--maybe more people would start doing those songs.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Malcolm_Pommie_Platt

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2014, 04:21:50 AM »
G'day Folks,
This is my first real post (besides my intro) so please be gentle.
I don't know how "obscure" this bluesman is, but I only found Belton Sutherland about a year ago. He only recorded 3 songs with Alan Lomax & all 3 were very raw, incredibly powerful songs. He looks & sounds like a man who has lived the blues his entire life.
Here's the links to youtube:



Offline Lyndvs

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Re: Hidden Treasures
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2014, 09:41:09 AM »




Jack Gowdlock is pretty cool.

 


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