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Sometimes I want to holler, sometimes I want to shout. Sometimes I want to cry, and wonder what about. I think I got the blues - Sonny Terry, I Think I Got The Blues

Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 124645 times)

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Offline eric

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2115 on: February 27, 2020, 07:03:31 AM »
I think he's playing out of C position with the guitar tuned a couple of steps low, and at the first "sign," he's sliding the C shape up two frets, and at the second sign, he does the same thing with the G7 shape.
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Eric

Offline Old Man Ned

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2116 on: February 29, 2020, 12:39:37 PM »
This is a beautiful piece. I've gone around in circles a bit on this one but have come around to it being played out of C in standard but about a whole step low. There's a part of this that reminds me of Rev Gary Davis' 'A Little More Faith in Jesus'.

Still unsure about what's going on behind the 'sing' parts though.

All the Best,
Ned

Offline eric

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2117 on: February 29, 2020, 02:06:24 PM »
Old Man Ned is correct I think.  I meant two frets, not steps, low.
--
Eric

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2118 on: March 03, 2020, 06:14:21 AM »
Agree C standard tuned low. For the first 'sign' he could be playing a first position G shape and sliding it up two frets from third to fifth fret. For the second 'sign' he could be doing this too, or maybe it's a first position C shape with the pinky on the third set of the first string slid up two frets?

Offline frailer24

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2119 on: March 04, 2020, 02:43:01 PM »
Here's my take on it:
Position: C standard, tuned a full step low sounding at Bb.
The choruses are a great example of melody taking the bass for a ride, as he plays:
x3xxx3 slid to the 5th fret behind the first "sign" and:
3xxxx3 sliding up to the 5th behind the second "sign".
Great number that I might decide to cover myself! :)
That's all she wrote Mabel!

Offline Forgetful Jones

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2120 on: March 04, 2020, 07:08:26 PM »

I think he's playing in C tuned down more than a full step.
1st "Sign" I think he's taking a C-shape (with the pinky on the 1st String 3rd fret) and sliding it up 2 frets.
2nd "Sign" I think he slides a G shape up 2 frets.

I first heard of this song here on WC a few years ago, and instantly loved it. I had never tried playing it until this puzzler came along. The way Prince Kid Moore comes in and out with the bass notes makes it tricky for me to find my groove.

Side notes: His voice reminds me a lot of Mance Lipscomb's. That outro makes me giggle every time I hear it.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2121 on: March 06, 2020, 03:14:55 PM »
Hi all,
The current puzzler on Kid Prince Moore's "Sign of Judgement" has been up a while and we've had no new responses in a couple of days, so I'll post the answers.

For Kid Prince Moore's "Sign of Judgement":
   * His playing position/tuning was C position in standard tuning, though tuned low, as I believe every responder had it.  Well done!
   * At the first time he sings "sign" in the chorus, he does a pinched double slide on the fifth and first strings, starting out fingering a C chord with the little finger fretting the third fret of the first string and the third or ring finger fretting the third fret of the fifth string.  Both strings slide up to the fifth fret on the word "sign".
   * At the second singing of "sign" in the chorus, he does another pinched double slide from the third to the fifth fret, but this time on the sixth and first strings in a G chord.  These two moves were described right on the money by frailer24 and Forgetful Jones, and as frailer24 noted, the phrases are perfect examples of the melody taking the bass for a ride.  Well done!

I sure like Kid Prince Moore's earnest way of singing the number, and the way he omits beats in the bass is interesting and I think makes the song a good candidate for figuring out, just the way he did it.

Thanks to all who responded, and I hope folks enjoyed "Sign of Judgement".
All best,
Johnm

Offline Forgetful Jones

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2122 on: March 07, 2020, 10:47:07 AM »
One more thing that I find interesting about Sign of Judgement is the bass during the 2 "Satan" verses. Moore goes from an alternating bass to a monotonic bass to dropping the bass completely in just a few measures. He does this both times, although there is a slight variation between the two. Cool stuff.

I also found this song much easier to play once I started singing along.

Cheers

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2123 on: April 02, 2020, 10:31:39 AM »
Hi all,
I hope everyone is staying careful, safe and healthy in the current public health crisis.  I realized it's been a little while since we've had a new puzzler, and with so many people having to stay home and perhaps with more time on their hands than usual, I though I'd post the first two-part puzzler in a while.  Both songs are from Babe Stovall, who was born in Mississippi but spent much of his adult life in New Orleans.  The first puzzler is Babe's piece "Maypole March".  Here it is:



For Babe Stovall's "Maypole March":
   * What playing position/tuning did he use to play the song?
   * Given his playing position/tuning, what is somewhat unusual about the bass he plays in the body of the song?

The second puzzler is Babe Stovall's version of "Boll Weevil".  Here it is:



INTRO SOLO

First heard tell of boll weevil, twenty-third of June
Looked over in my cotton field, he was sittin' in a cotton bloom
He had a home, in the cotton bloom

SOLO

Went to the merchant, asked him what he think of that:
I found a boll weevil in my Sunday hat
He had a home, in the cotton bloom

SOLO

Went to the merchant, asked him for a-meal and a mule
"You go home, old nigger, the boll weevil's in your field.
You go home, and let me alone."

SOLO X 2

Went down to the brier patch, heard a great racket
Nothin' but a bull frog, pullin' off his jacket
(Guitar concludes verse)

SOLO X 2

For Babe Stovall's "Boll Weevil":
   * What playing position/tuning did he use to play the song?
   * Babe begins most of his verses with three hammers in the treble from where to where?

Please use only your ears and your instruments to arrive at your answers.  Answer as few or as many of the questions as you wish, and please don't post any answers before 8:00 AM your time on Sunday, April 5.  Thanks for your participation and I hope you enjoy the songs.

All best,
Johnm 
« Last Edit: May 04, 2020, 09:21:56 AM by Johnm »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2124 on: April 07, 2020, 12:12:18 PM »
Hi all,
Any takers for the Babe Stovall puzzlers?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2125 on: April 08, 2020, 04:57:39 AM »
For Babe Stovall's "Maypole March":
   * What playing position/tuning did he use to play the song? -Vestapol
   * Given his playing position/tuning, what is somewhat unusual about the bass he plays in the body of the song?-Is he playing the bass on the open fourth string?


-For Babe Stovall's "Boll Weevil":
   * What playing position/tuning did he use to play the song? - standard G
   * Babe begins most of his verses with three hammers in the treble from where to where? - second string open to second string third fret.

Offline Old Man Ned

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2126 on: April 08, 2020, 12:45:56 PM »
For Babe Stovall's "Maypole March":
   Playing position/tuning I'm hearing in Vestapol/Open D
   What is somewhat unusual about the bass he plays in the body of the song? Is he alternating the open 5th & 4th strings as opposed to the more 'usual' open 6th & 4th strings?

For Babe Stovall's "Boll Weevil":
   This was causing me some turmoil for some reason, but yeah, standard G sounds to fit for me.
   Again, agree with Prof Scratchy on the three hammers in the treble - open 2nd string to 3rd fret.

Offline blueshome

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2127 on: April 09, 2020, 05:15:23 AM »
Now that Iíve got to it, Iím with the Prof.

Offline Forgetful Jones

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2128 on: April 09, 2020, 04:08:05 PM »
Maypole March- Vestapol tuning, but he doesn't seem to play the 6th string much, which would be unusual for that tuning.

Boll Weevil- Standard tuning, G position. He hammers the 2nd string from open to the 3rd fret (then hits that fretted note again on the 2nd string)

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2129 on: April 15, 2020, 09:05:58 AM »
Hi all,
It has been a while since there have been any new posts on the Babe Stovall puzzlers, so I will post the answers.  Here they are:

For Babe Stovall's "Maypole March":
   * His playing position/tuning was Vestapol tuning, played in the key of the open sixth, fourth and first strings.  Ever responder had this right.
   * Given his playing position and tuning, what was unusual about Babe Stovall's bass alternation is that he almost completely avoids the low root of the I chord, the open sixth string, and chooses instead to alternate between the open with and fourth strings over his I chord.  I don't think he hits the open sixth string at all until the very end of the song, when he hits it when playing a wind-up chord.  Old Man Ned and Forgetful Jones put their fingers on what was unusual about Babe Stovall's bass on the tune.

For Babe Stovall's "Boll Weevil":
   * His playing position/tuning was G position in standard tuning.  Once again, every responder had this right--good hearing!
   * Babe Stovall's three hammers in the treble at the beginning of most of his verse accompaniments are from the open second string to the third fret of the second string, exactly as Prof Scratchy had it in his initial response, and as Old Man Ned, blueshome and Forgetful Jones noted, too.

I think that Babe Stovall's playing has been under-examined by most of us present-day players of this music.  He had some really original sounds in the way he played in G position in standard tuning and in other playing positions as well.
Thanks to all who participated in the puzzlers, and I hope folks enjoyed the tunes.

All best,
Johnm

 


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