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All right boys, say, play that piano loud and bring me some more of that catjuice up there - Peg Leg Howell, "Chittlin' Supper"

Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 110908 times)

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Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2100 on: January 01, 2020, 02:52:17 PM »
Iím with mgalup on the position and tuning. Interesting to hear a 12 string tuned to concert pitch for this performance. I agree too with the ascending/descending run. As for the other questions, Iím afraid my hearing aids fail me!


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Online Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2101 on: January 03, 2020, 06:50:29 AM »
Hi all,
Any other takers for the puzzler on Mae Glover and John Byrd's "Shake It Daddy"?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm

Offline blueshome

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2102 on: January 03, 2020, 10:04:28 AM »
Nothing to add to the others.  A great 12-string sound, on other songs heís even higher pitched IIRC. The only other I can think of just now is Barbecue Bob.

Online Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2103 on: January 08, 2020, 10:24:21 AM »
Hi all,
There have been no new responses to the Mae Glover/John Byrd puzzler on "Shake It Daddy", so I'll post the answers:

For "Shake It Daddy, John Byrd:
   * played the song out of G position in standard tuning, as all who responded had it--well done!
   * played the ascending/descending run at :05--:06, ascending chromatically on the second string from the open string to the third fret and then descending chromatically back to the open second string, 0-1-2-3-2-1-0, as Mark had it, and John Byrd did open up on the sixth string during the run, freeing up his third finger to fret the third fret of the second string and otherwise assigning a finger to a fret for the run, and free-handing it.  It's a very "smart hand" move.
   * fretted what he played from :20--:21 at 1-0-0-3, moving from the fourth string to the first string, left to right.  It would be possible to assign some kind of abstruse chordal designation to this combination of notes, like Eb augmented, but what he is doing is essentially going from the C major chord that precedes this chord to a C minor, with the minor third, Eb, voiced at the first fret of the fourth string.  I expect he vacated the first fret of the second string he had been fretting in the C chord and just moved his index finger over to the first fret of the fourth string, leaving his little finger fretting the third fret of the first string, where it had been in the C chord.
   * played the bass run from 2:07--2:10 like so:  Third fret of the sixth string to second fret of the fifth string, open fourth string, second fret of the fourth string, open third string, second fret of the fourth string played twice, open fourth string played twice, second fret of the fourth string, open third string, second fret of the fourth string, open fourth string, following with a big treble brush stroke of the top of a G chord.  The run covers the third measure of the form and the first three beats of the fourth measure in that verse.

I sure wish that Mae Glover and John Byrd had been recorded doing more titles together, because the ones they did were all stellar.  John Byrd was seriously under-recorded, given his level of skill and invention.  He's one of my absolute favorite 12-string guitar players in the style.

Thanks to the folks who responded to the puzzler and I hope you enjoyed the song.

All best,
Johnm

 


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