collapse

* Member Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

* Like Us on Facebook

* Support Weenie!

Shop on Amazon using these search boxes and Weenie earns a small commission:
USA
Search Now:
In Association with Amazon

United Kingdom
Search Now:
In Association with Amazon

Canada
Search Now:
In Association with Amazon

* Weenie's CD!

We used to go to different people's houses, you know. In those days I mean they could hear music and - if somebody could play an instrument, man, they would get up at night, from one o'clock; and they'd fix food and they'd have drinks and they'd stay up till five, six o'clock in the morning and give you money. It wasn't a dance but a serenade; we'd go from house to house. In those days there wasn't too much things like juke boxes, high fidelity sound, wasn't nothing like that then; and whenever somebody could play and could play well, he was considered as somebody; he could go anywhere and he had it made, you know? - Baby Doo Caston, on playing music in Natchez in the 1920s, interview with Jeff Todd Titon

Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 101005 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 10436
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2055 on: June 10, 2019, 09:58:16 AM »
Hi all,
I have a new puzzler for those of you who are interested.  It is from Willie Trice, and it is his version of "Shine On".  Here is Willie's performance of the song:



The questions about Willie Trice's "Shine On" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Willie Trice use to play the song?
   * What is the length, in bars, of his form, and where is the form long, as compared to the norm for such songs?
   * What two chords did Willie Trice play in the seventh bar of the form?

Please don't post any answers before 8:00 AM your time on Thursday, June 13, and please use only your ears and guitars to arrive at your answers.  Thanks for your participation and I hope you enjoy the song.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Rivers

  • Tech Support
  • Member
  • Posts: 6901
  • I like chicken pie
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2056 on: June 13, 2019, 01:43:24 PM »
Here's what I've got.

 * What playing position/tuning did Willie Trice use to play the song?

1st position E, standard tuning

* What is the length, in bars, of his form, and where is the form long, as compared to the norm for such songs?

It's an 8 bar blues long by one bar. He's long in the 7th bar taking the familiar 8 bar form out to 9 bars.

 * What two chords did Willie Trice play in the seventh bar of the form?
 
Firstly, the one chord E in a second position inversion, I think 4-x-2-4-0-4,
Second, descending to the five chord B7/5, 2-x-1-2-0-2
...resolving back at the one in first position

Online Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 10436
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2057 on: June 15, 2019, 08:22:30 AM »
Hi all,
Any other takers for the puzzler on Willie Trice's "Shine On"?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm

Offline Old Man Ned

  • Member
  • Posts: 263
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2058 on: June 15, 2019, 11:51:25 AM »
I'm mostly in agreement with Rivers. E standard and one bar long. But I was thinking a C#7 4 4 3 4 2 4 before it goes down to the B7 in the 7th bar.

Offline Prof Scratchy

  • Member
  • Posts: 1580
  • Howdy!
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2059 on: June 16, 2019, 06:46:48 AM »
I agree with Rivers and Ned, though I think the mystery chord is x43404.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: June 16, 2019, 12:05:04 PM by Prof Scratchy »

Offline blueshome

  • Member
  • Posts: 1355
  • Step on it!
    • Blueshome
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2060 on: June 17, 2019, 06:03:19 AM »
Key of E. Extra beats after the A chord. The ?mystery chord? would seem to be the B7 moved up 2 frets.
Some of the moves are very reminiscent of Buddy Moss.

Offline joe paul

  • Member
  • Posts: 96
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2061 on: June 21, 2019, 01:29:13 AM »
I agree with all the above on standard tuning in E and an 8 bar form hanging on the I chord to make it long.
I think it's the 4th fret on the 4th string and 3rd on the 3rd string then open top string (x x 4 3 x x 0, an E shape moved up 2 frets)  before the  x 2 1 x x 2 for the B7. Nice.
 
 

Offline Rivers

  • Tech Support
  • Member
  • Posts: 6901
  • I like chicken pie
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2062 on: June 21, 2019, 01:12:30 PM »
well, someone gotta be right...!  :P

Offline Old Man Ned

  • Member
  • Posts: 263
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2063 on: June 21, 2019, 01:16:08 PM »
You would hope so, wouldn't you!  :-)

Online Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 10436
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2064 on: June 22, 2019, 09:11:49 AM »
Hi all,
The Willie Trice puzzler on "Shine On" has been up for a good while now and has generated several responses, so I'll post the answers.

For Willie Trice's "Shine On":
   * His playing position was E position in standard tuning, as every response had it.  Well done!
   * His form for "Shine On" was nine bars long, for a lyric and melody that would normally be phrased in eight bars.  Blueshome had the long place in Willie Trice's form accurately spotted--it is the fifth bar, where he resolves to a musically extraneous bar of the I chord.  In such songs, the vocal phrase for the last four bars normally starts in the tail end of the fourth bar, the second bar of the IV chord.  Willie Trice finishes up his IV chord, adds the extra bar of I, and starts singing the final phrase in the tail end of that measure.  His phrasing is not "wrong", but it is specific to him.
   * The two chords that Willie Trice played in the seventh bar of the form are an F#7 (II7) and a B7 (V7).  Doing it this way, he gets a II-V- I resolution, going from the seventh bar to the eighth bar, a sound that Carl Martin and Little Hat Jones also employed in E.  Joe paul had the F#7 properly identified.  One of the neat things about doing the F#7 in this context is that the seventh of the chord ends up being the open first string, so you can do a thumb-wrapped F leaving the first string open and move it up one fret and you have the chord (though Willie Trice never sounds the second fret of the sixth string).

Thanks to all who participated, and I hope folks enjoyed "Shine On".  I'll look for another song to post soon.
All best,
Johnm

Online Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 10436
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2065 on: July 15, 2019, 10:35:51 AM »
Hi all,
I have a new puzzler for those of you who are interested.  The cut is "Sweetest Apple On The Tree", featuring singer Brooks Berry, accompanied by Scrapper Blackwell on guitar, from their duo album that was released on Prestige-Bluesville.  Here is the track:



INTRO

Used to be, sweetest apple on the tree
Used to be, sweetest apple on the tree
Hey, hey, baby, you ain't what you used to be

You had a nail, and you drove it in the board
You had a nail, and you drove it in the board
Lord, my daddy ain't here, but he's somewheres on the road

I woke up this morning with the same thing on my mind
I woke up this morning with the same thing on my mind
I had blues and trouble and was worried all the time

Lord, my heart struck sorrow, and my tears come rolling down
Lord, then my heart struck sorrows, and my tears come rolling down
I'm gonna buy me a ticket and beat it for another town

I went to the bus station, and I looked up on the board
I went to the bus station, I looked up on the board
Lord, and your bus ain't here, but it's further on down the road

I sat by my window, looked through the window pane
I sat by my window, and looked through the window pane
Lord, the tears from my eyes, just like drops of rain

OUTRO

The questions on "Sweetest Apple On The Tree" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Scrapper Blackwell use to play the song?
   * Where did Scrapper fret what he plays in the treble from :27--:30, and what chord does it make, relative to his tuning?
   * Where is Scrapper fretting and playing the triplet figure he plays from 1:35--1:46?
   * Where did Scrapper fret and play the descending harmonized lines from 4:04-4:06

Please use only your ears and your guitar to arrive at your answers, and please don't post any answers before 8:00 AM your time on Thursday, July 18.  Thanks for your participation, and I hope you enjoy the song and figuring out your answers, whether or not you choose to post them.
All best,
Johnm 
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 03:42:46 PM by Johnm »

Online Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 10436
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2066 on: July 19, 2019, 10:01:46 AM »
Hi all,
Any takers for the Brooks Berry/Scrapper Blackwell puzzler, "Sweetest Apple On The Tree"?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm

Offline Prof Scratchy

  • Member
  • Posts: 1580
  • Howdy!
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2067 on: July 20, 2019, 02:50:55 AM »
The questions on "Sweetest Apple On The Tree" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Scrapper Blackwell use to play the song? - E standard tuned low
   * Where did Scrapper fret what he plays in the treble from :27--:30, and what chord does it make, relative to his tuning? - 02x132 (donít know the name of the chord - he seems to hammer onto the first fret of the third string, followed by open sixth, then second fret first string followed by seventh note on third fret of second string)
   * Where is Scrapper fretting and playing the triplet figure he plays from 1:35--1:46?  - this sounds like a Lightnin Hopkins E inversion on the seventh fret of the third and first strings and the fifth fret of the second string.
   * Where did Scrapper fret and play the descending harmonized lines from 4:04 - 4.06 - sounds like he pinches fourth fret of strings 6 and3, descending chromatically via fret 3 to fret2. After each pinch he brushes upwards on open strings 1 and 2. At the of this series he goes back to first position E.




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: July 20, 2019, 12:08:01 PM by Prof Scratchy »

Offline Old Man Ned

  • Member
  • Posts: 263
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2068 on: July 20, 2019, 09:59:13 AM »
For "Sweetest Apple On The Tree" I'm hearing playing position/tuning as E standard about a step low

Fretting what Scrapper plays in the treble from :27--:30 as
2
3
1
2?
2?
0
not sure if he's holding the E and/or B on the 4th and 5th strings, but I would call this an E9


Scrapper fretting and playing the triplet figure he plays from 1:35--1:46 at
7
5
7
x
x
0
   
and the the descending harmonized lines from 4:04-4:06
4th fret for 6th and 3rd string walking down through 3rd to 2nd fret, hitting open first\second strings, resolving to a standard E chord with a wee hammer on to the 3rd string 1st fret.

Offline blueshome

  • Member
  • Posts: 1355
  • Step on it!
    • Blueshome
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2069 on: July 21, 2019, 12:48:20 AM »
I got as far as deciding for E standard tuned low and the E9 chord  but no further, but on relistening, agree with the others.

 


anything