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Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 96960 times)

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Offline blueshome

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2040 on: April 26, 2019, 01:08:45 AM »
Cross note tuning was my first guess but relistening I will go with the Prof.

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2041 on: April 27, 2019, 04:10:27 AM »
Phil, you never learn! I?m expecting a 100% fail rate on this!


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Offline blueshome

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2042 on: April 28, 2019, 12:39:30 AM »
I?m the one with the tin ear......

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2043 on: April 29, 2019, 09:33:44 AM »
Hi all,
Any other takers for the puzzler on Lonzie Thomas's "Hard Pill to Swallow"?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2044 on: May 03, 2019, 09:35:17 AM »
Hi all,
It appears that all of the responses are in for the Lonzie Thomas puzzler on "Hard Pill To Swallow", so I'll post the answers.

For Lonzie Thomas's "Hard Pill To Swallow":
   * His playing position/tuning was cross-note tuning.  As you listen to the song, you can hear the first fret hammer on the third string to the major third of the I chord, and it's apparent that the I note is the open sixth string and the open first string.  This puts Lonzie in either E position, standard tuning, EAEGBE tuning or cross-note.  Lonnie never hits anything on his fourth string except a I note, and that note is never inflected, either hammered into, pulled off into, or bent, so it seems safe to assume that it is an open string since that would make the left hand so much easier than having to hold down the second fret of that string down for the duration of the song.  This eliminates E position in standard tuning as a possibility, leaving EAEGBE and cross-note in the running.  Lonzie never hits anything lower than a V note on his fifth string, and never plays a low IV note in the bass at all--in the instances in which he implies a IV chord, he always hits a VI note, the third of the IV chord in the bass.  Since EAEGBE makes an open string IV note available in the bass, and that note never gets played in the course of the song, what it suggests is that the V note on the fifth string is an open string, and the VI note that is occasionally played on the fifth string lives at the second fret of the fifth string, where it is commonly fretted in Vestapol and cross-note tuning.  Since Vestapol was eliminated from the running early on, that leaves the piece in cross-note tuning.  You had it, Phil--you should have stood your ground!
   * In the course of his rendition, Lonzie Thomas never frets a note on the neck higher than the third fret, as Old Man Ned had it.  In fact, the piece is a model of economy in the left hand, with the only fretting in the course of the song occurring at the second fret of the fifth string, the second and first frets of the third string, the third and second frets of the second string and the third and second frets of the first string.  I haven't really tried to play the piece, but I think it will--it lays out beautifully.  I love the way Lonzie Thomas played time, with intermittent notes in the bass and sort of built-in pauses in his phrasing.
I believe Lonzie Thomas has three or possibly four songs on the George Mitchell collection on Fat Possum, but he actually recorded about an album's worth of songs for George Mitchell which can be purchased from Fat Possum.  I think he was one of George Mitchell's really stellar discoveries, a wonderful singer and player with a very distinctive and original style.  It's worth picking up everything he recorded.

Thanks to Prof Scratchy, Old Man Ned, and blueshome for responding to the puzzler, and I hope that folks enjoyed the song.  I'll look for another puzzler to post before too long.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2045 on: May 11, 2019, 12:11:19 PM »
Hi all,
I have a new puzzler for those of you who are interested.  It is Charles Caldwell's "I Got Something To Tell You".  Here is the song:



The questions on Charles Caldwell's "I Got Something To Tell You" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Charles Caldwell use to play the song?
   * Which of the three chords, I, IV or V, usually played in blues is altogether omitted from "I Got something To Tell You"?
   * Charles Caldwell does virtually all of his singing over what chord?

Please use only your ears and guitars to arrive at your answers, and please don't post any answers before 8:00 AM your time on Tuesday, May 14.  Thanks for your participation, and I hope you enjoy the song.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Old Man Ned

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2046 on: May 15, 2019, 01:40:43 PM »
I'm hearing Charles Caldwell's "I Got Something To Tell You" in A standard with the V chord omitted and singing over the IV chord.
 

Offline Forgetful Jones

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2047 on: May 16, 2019, 03:59:16 AM »
Hello-
Nice choice of songs John. It sounds like Caldwell is playing out of A position in standard tuning (alternating between a long A and an A7). He sings over his IV chord- D7, and he does not play a V chord at all.

I liked this album a lot when it came out.

Take care

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2048 on: May 16, 2019, 07:59:29 AM »
Agree with Ned and Forgetful!


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Offline blueshome

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2049 on: May 17, 2019, 12:16:10 AM »
What he said.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2050 on: May 20, 2019, 09:02:40 AM »
Hi all,
It appears that all of the responses are in on the Charles Caldwell puzzler, "I Got Something To Tell You", so I'll post the answers.

For Charles Caldwell's "I Got Something To Tell You":
   * His playing position was A position in standard tuning
   * He never played a V chord
   * Virtually all of his singing was done over the IV chord.

From Old Man Ned's initial response to blueshome's final one, not a single participant set a false foot in answering the questions.  Well done!  I sure like Charles Caldwell's musical gravitas, he always sounded like he meant what he was playing and singing and not just fooling around.  Thanks to those who participated and I'll look for another puzzler to post soon.
All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: May 20, 2019, 09:20:07 AM by Johnm »

Offline Rivers

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2051 on: June 07, 2019, 06:22:36 PM »
Wow. I had not heard him (or 'of him') before. Obviously he was influenced by Ry Cooder's tone (<-joking). Brilliant sound, love the vocal vibrato.

Offline Slack

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2052 on: June 07, 2019, 07:54:39 PM »
Caldwell's playing and singing reminds me so much of Robert Belfour and that Mississippi hill country "pulse music" - in fact I need to go look Caldwell up, where he is from... is it Mississippi?  also...

It's Friday, and I admit I've had a few pops, and feeling sentimental, but I think it is so great, and too cool, that our resident pro, is really into hill country music.  I know of no other pro whose 'musical gravitas', so enthuses about 2 chord songs.... and this genre! 

Thank you John Miller!


Offline Slack

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2053 on: June 07, 2019, 07:58:00 PM »
Yes!  I'm finally getting it.

Charles W. Caldwell (May 18, 1943 ? September 3, 2003)[1][2][3] was an American musician from Mississippi, known for a raw and fiery brand of electric North Mississippi hill country blues.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2054 on: June 09, 2019, 05:31:16 PM »
Thanks for the good words, John D!

 


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