collapse

* Member Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

* Like Us on Facebook

* Support Weenie!

Shop on Amazon using these search boxes and Weenie earns a small commission:
USA
Search Now:
In Association with Amazon

United Kingdom
Search Now:
In Association with Amazon

Canada
Search Now:
In Association with Amazon

* Weenie's CD!

All I hope for in life is to have one good idea that last me until I die. And if that one runs out, to have another one - Mark Graham, on musical creativity

Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 89787 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Prof Scratchy

  • Member
  • Posts: 1556
  • Howdy!
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2025 on: February 22, 2019, 07:17:09 AM »
For the IV chord x04535?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Offline Norfolk Slim

  • Member
  • Posts: 967
    • Moonshine - Available at Bandcamp now...
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2026 on: February 22, 2019, 01:39:24 PM »
554535?

Offline David Kaatz

  • Member
  • Posts: 256
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2027 on: February 22, 2019, 03:11:42 PM »
Wow, hard to hear the IV chord with the bass playing in there too. I think maybe:
x
3
5
4
x
x

Offline Old Man Ned

  • Member
  • Posts: 251
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2028 on: February 23, 2019, 11:36:11 AM »
On more listening, is he fingering it around
0
3
5
4
X
5

Not always using the open E, but it's there if he feels like it?

Offline Pan

  • Member
  • Posts: 1883
  • Howdy!
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2029 on: February 23, 2019, 03:22:05 PM »
How about an  X-0-4-5-5-5?

Great tune from Lightnin'!

Cheers

Pan

Offline waxwing

  • Member
  • Posts: 2501
    • Wax's YouTube Channel
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2030 on: February 23, 2019, 03:57:45 PM »
I think most of the regulars have responded so I don't think this is a spoiler, and I may not be around during the week when you provide your transcription Johnm.

Lightnin' played Shinin' Moon on a TV show around 1970, a video of which is included and taught by Ernie Hawkins in his Guitar Workshop lesson on Lightnin'. He definitely developed the arrangement somewhat in the almost 20 years between these two, so not what he does here exactly. Per Ernie, and readily visible, he fingers xx45x5, strumming on the down beat (damping the 2nd string), and then on the 3rd beat slides his thumb up from the 3rd to 5th frets on the 5th and 6th strings to complete the chord as 5545x5. He clearly had not added the slide up in the bass at the time of this earlier recording, but anyone who plays the song will want to see the video for some more ideas. He adds a quick IV in the second measure, with the same bass slide, and utilizes the repeating hammer-on from the open G to the A extensively at the intro and elsewhere.

I never really worked this one up, so thanks for bringing my attention to it again Johnm. I've been playing out more and this would be a fun one to play. And it's a good example of how a player develops a performance over time, which is something you have posted about in the past Johnm. I particularly think the addition of the quick IV is interesting, and wonder if Lightnin' used it in earlier recordings or if it is something he picked up in the 50s-60s?

Lighnin's clip is at the beginning of the video.



Wax
« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 04:05:32 PM by waxwing »
"People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it."
George Bernard Shaw

http://www.youtube.com/user/WaxwingJohn
https://www.facebook.com/WaxwingJohn

Willie Brown's Liquor at CD Baby

Offline Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 10257
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2031 on: March 01, 2019, 09:47:25 AM »
Hi all,
There haven't been any recent responses to the Lightnin' Hopkins puzzler on "Shining Moon", so I'll post the answers.

For Lightnin' Hopkins' "Shining Moon":
   * His playing position was A in standard tuning, as everyone who responded had it--well done!
   * Lightnin' fretted the run he played in his solo from 1:09--1:12 as follows:  He began the run on beat two of the measure playing a triplet that begins with a slide to the fifth fret of the second string, going from there to the third and then the fourth fret of the first string.  On beat three, he played another triplet, going from the fifth fret of the first string to the third fret of the first string followed by either the open first string or the fifth fret of the second string.  On beat four, he played another triplet, going from the third fret of the second string to either the first fret of the second string and the second fret of the third string, or possibly played the middle note of that triplet at the fifth fret of the third string.  He concluded the run hitting the downbeat of the next measure at the second fret of the fourth string.
   * From 1:18--1:22 Lightnin' fretted the following run:  He begins the run on the + of beat four in the ninth bar of the form, doing a thumb hammer at the second fret of the sixth string after striking the open sixth string. In the tenth bar of the form, on 1 + he goes from the open fifth string to the second fret of the third string.  On beat two, he plays a triplet starting at the first fret of the second string, going from there to a grace note slide into the fourth fret of the second string, and from there to the third fret of the first string.  On beat three, he plays a triplet going from the fourth fret of the first string to the fifth fret of the first string and from there to the third fret of the first string.  On beat four, he plays another triplet, going from the open first string to the third fret of the second string, followed by the first fret of the second string, landing on the second fret of the third string on the downbeat of the eleventh bar of the form.
   * Lightnin' most often fretted his IV chord under his singing, in the fifth and sixth bars of his form, at 5-5-4-5-X-5, using a sort of B7 position from the base of the neck moved up three frets, with either his thumb fretting both fifth and sixth strings at the fifth fret, or just the sixth string, or neither, in which case, he would have been using his second or middle finger to mash down and fret both the sixth and fifth strings.  The fingering that Prof Scratchy suggested, 0-4-5-3-5, from the fifth to the first string, is one that was used by other Texas and Oklahoma players, most notably J. T. Smith and Lil Son Jackson.  What struck me about Lightnin's sound on his IV chord in the fifth and sixth bars of the form is that he never once sounds his B or second string, either open, at the third fret or at the fifth fret, all places he might plausibly have chosen to sound it.  Instead, he neither fretted nor sounded the string.

Thanks to all who responded to the puzzler.  Lightin' was sure great.  I will look for another puzzler to post soon.  Incidentally, the post from waxwing that precedes this one was a spoiler when it was originally posted, so I waited until the puzzler had been answered to put it up on the board.
All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: March 01, 2019, 09:49:25 AM by Johnm »

Offline Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 10257
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2032 on: Yesterday at 12:09:50 PM »
Hi all,
We haven't had a new puzzler for a while,  I've found one--Jimmy Murphy's "Electricity".  Here it is:



The questions on "Electricity" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Jimmy Murphy use to play the song?
   * Describe the bar structure and chord progression, in Roman numerals of Jimmy Murphy's first two solos.

Please use only your ears and guitars to arrive at your answers, and please don't post any responses before 8:00 AM your time on Thursday, March 21.  Thanks for your participation and I hope you enjoy the song.
All best,
Johnm