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Now a short haired woman waiting for to carry your troubles on. Make you think through the daytime, trouble you all night long. She make you think you right, when you know darn well you wrong - Will Batts, Country Woman

Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 97767 times)

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Offline Old Man Ned

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1905 on: June 14, 2018, 01:22:49 PM »
Do I love this tune...this is what I'm getting so far:
Open G, capo'd up

from 0:00--:04
----------------------------
---0------------------------
0--0--0---0------0--0----0
0--0----4--------------4---
0-------------3w-----------
-----------------------------

w=bend

The IV chord he plays from :28--31 is bugging me. I'm approximating this with

--5-
--0-
--0-
--5-
----
----
where there is some emphasis to bring out the 4th and 3rd strings and the first string at the 5th fret just rings out, if that makes any sense.



Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1906 on: June 18, 2018, 09:49:58 AM »
Hi all,
It appears that everyone who intended to respond to the puzzler on Wade Walton's version of "Shake 'Em On Down" has done so, so I will post the answers now.

For Wade Walton's "Shake 'Em On Down":
   * His playing position was Spanish tuning, as everyone who responded had it--well done!
   * His signature lick, which he first plays from :00--:04 works like this, I believe:  On beat 1, he brushes the open fifth and fourth strings, and on the + of beat one, he brushes the open third and second strings. On beat two he brushes the fourth third and second strings, fretting the fourth string at the fifth fret, pulling off to the third fret of of the fourth string and then hammering back to the fifth fret on the + of beat two, while simultaneously brushing the open third and second strings on the + of beat two.  On beat 3, he hits the third fret of the sixth string followed by a brush of the open third and second strings on the + of beat 3.  Beat four repeats what he played on beat 2.  This signature lick has a wonderful spareness to it, especially when played underneath his singing, and Wade Walton plays it with great control and consistency.
   * Wade Walton's IV chord is as Prof Scratchy had it X-5-X-0-0-5.  It's conceivable that he fretted the sixth and fourth strings, but he did not sound them.  I have never heard another player in the style utilize this voicing of a IV chord when playing in Spanish.  What is also interesting is that when Wade Walton plays the IV chord in his turn-around in his solo, he plays a conventional IV chord, barring the top four strings at the fifth fret.

Thanks  to Prof Scratchy, Forgetful Jones and Old Man Ned for participating in the puzzler, and I hope folks enjoyed Wade Walton's version of "Shake 'Em On Down".  I'll look for another puzzler to post soon.
all best,
Johnm

   

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1907 on: June 29, 2018, 12:11:04 PM »
Hi all,
I've got a new puzzler for those of you who are interested.  It is Larry Johnson's "Say What You Mean", taken from an album recorded when he was twenty-one years old, in 1959.  Like a lot of musicians, Larry's voice deepened over the years, and it's interesting to hear how much higher his vocal range was on this early recording than in his later years.  Here is "Say What You Mean":



INTRO

Say what you mean, and mean just what you say
Say what you mean, and mean just what you say
Because there's phonies dropping out, they're dropping out day by day

Well, you tell her that you love her, say you love her to her bones
Well, when you tell it to her, don't you tell it to her wrong
REFRAIN: Say what you mean, and mean just what you say
Because there's phonies dropping out, they're dropping out day by day

Now, there used to be a time that you could keep your woman fooled
But if you take it real close, man, they playin' it real cool
REFRAIN: Say what you mean, and mean just what you say
Because there's phonies dropping out, they're dropping out day by day

OUTRO

The questions on Larry Johnson's "Say What You Mean" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Larry use to play the song?
   * Where did he fret his bass run signature lick, which he plays from :18--:21, and throughout the song?
   * Where did Larry fret what he played over his IV chord, from :57--:58?

Please use only your ears and your guitars to arrive at your answers, and please don't post any answers before 8:00 AM your time on Monday, July 2.  Thanks for your participation and I hope you enjoy Larry Johnson's rendition of "Say What You Mean".
All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: August 10, 2018, 06:05:53 AM by Johnm »

Offline Stuart

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1908 on: June 29, 2018, 02:27:56 PM »
In the interest of thread drift, Stefan Wirz put all of "presenting the country blues" up on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjaKUgK9hbx9nUaFRXe0fAVZPV9vty2sY

« Last Edit: June 29, 2018, 02:33:03 PM by Stuart »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1909 on: July 03, 2018, 09:49:40 AM »
Hi all,
Any takers for the Larry Johnson puzzler, "Say What You Mean"?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1910 on: July 04, 2018, 01:58:47 AM »
Am in the Western Isles just now with not enough internet connection to play videos, so may have to pass on this one!

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Offline blueshome

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1911 on: July 04, 2018, 03:29:25 AM »
I?ll have go.
C standard
Run is 4th string 0121 5th string; 3 roll strings 6&5 at 3rd fret 4th string 01
5th string 3

Offline Vermonter

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1912 on: July 04, 2018, 07:58:26 AM »
For Larry Johnson on youtube: thanks, Stefan!

Offline Old Man Ned

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1913 on: July 04, 2018, 01:48:42 PM »
Bit late with this as I've been away with my work but I'm hearing this in C standard. For the bass run signature lick, which he plays from :18--:21, and throughout the song I'm getting something like:
-----------------------
-----------------------
---------0------------
--0-1-2-----------0--
3----------3----2----3
--------------3---------

Where did Larry fret what he played over his IV chord from :57--:58?
Is this an F chord at the 1st fret. doing something like:
-------------
--1-----3--1
--1h2--3--2
--3-----3--3
-------------
1------------
for want of a better way of describing it.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1914 on: July 09, 2018, 06:40:54 AM »
Hi all,
It appears that everyone who intended to post answers to the Larry Johnson puzzler, "Say What You Mean" has done so, so I will post the answers.

For Larry Johnson's "Say What You Mean":
   * His playing position was C position in standard tuning, as all who responded had it--well done!
   * Larry Johnson played his bass signature lick from :18--:21, and throughout the song, like so:  On the + of beat 1, he plays the third fret of the fifth string.  On beat 2, he plays a triplet, walking up the fourth string chromatically, open, first fret, second fret.  On beat three, he plays another triplet, going from the open third string to the third fret of the sixth string and then to the open fifth string.  On beat four, he plays another triplet, going from the first fret to the second fret on the fifth string and then to the open fourth string, resolving back to the third fret of the fifth string where he began the run on the downbeat of the next measure.
   * Larry fretted what he played over the IV chord, from :57--:58, as follows:  On the + of beat one of the measure, he begins a thumb roll from the third fret of the fourth string, following through with the thumb and brushing the third fret of the third and second strings on beat 2.  On the + of beat 2, he returns with the thumb to the third fret of the fourth string, beginning another thumb roll, following through with a brush of the third and second strings in which the third string has a hammer from an index finger barre at the first fret to the second finger fretting the second fret of the third string, and the index barre frets the first fret of the second string.  By rocking to 3-3-3 on the fourth through second strings on beat two, Larry is essentially going to a momentary Bb chord, which functions as the IV of the IV chord, F.  It's a move that J B Lenoir especially liked and used a lot.  Old Man Ned pretty much had this move figured out.

Thanks to those who participated, and I hope folks enjoyed the song.

All best,
Johnm

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1915 on: July 15, 2018, 01:22:55 PM »
Hi all,
I have a new puzzler for those of you who are interested.  It is George Henry Bussey's "Looking For My Woman".  Here is the track:



The question on "Looking For My Woman" is:
   * What playing position/tuning did George Henry Bussey use to play the song?

Please use only your ears and your guitars to arrive at your answers, and please don't post any answers before 8:00 AM your time on Tuesday, July 17th.  Thanks for participating and I hope you enjoy the song.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1916 on: July 19, 2018, 06:06:33 AM »
I?ll say A standard, tuned very low to sound in E.


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Offline Old Man Ned

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1917 on: July 19, 2018, 12:47:47 PM »
I initially thought E tuned very low as I'm hearing it follow the chord progression found in Crow Jane but the more I listen the more I'm hearing George Henry Bussey's "Looking For My Woman" played out of G tuned about a step and a half down.

Love this tune. Made me go back and listen to the other Gearge Mitchell recordings of George Henry Bussey.


Offline Forgetful Jones

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1918 on: July 19, 2018, 07:39:57 PM »
I think its in A position tuned way down low.

Offline joe paul

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1919 on: July 20, 2018, 02:52:30 AM »
I'd say A tuned low too. Nice, I'll have to listen to his other tunes.