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Don't let a woman know you love her, if you do you have done wrong - Arthur Petties, Out On Santa Fe Blues

Author Topic: old-time banjo  (Read 8327 times)

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Offline frankie

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2007, 06:13:13 PM »
I was playing it in a borderline-obsessive way for a while, but that's now been replaced by "Chilly Winds."  Your description of the right hand in "Married Man's Blues" matches how I worked it out - the 1st and 2nd strings are played open throughout, the 2rd string is often played as a hammer-on to the 2nd fret, and the 4th is often played as a pull off from the 3rd fret to the open string.

Where did you get that "Cumberland Gap" from?  Sounds interesting.

Offline Johnm

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2007, 12:41:13 AM »
Hi Frank,
Thanks for the additional information on "Married Man's Blues".  As for that way of playing "Cumberland Gap" that I mentioned, I just came up with it, and can't recall the thought process/hearing that led to it.  Banjo particularly seems to lend itself to song-specific tunings and different right hand approaches.  I really love it.  It sounds so great and is so fun to play.
Al best,
Johnm

Offline uncle bud

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2010, 05:19:51 AM »
Rather than starting a new topic, I thought I'd post in this good old one, since it deals largely with Dock Boggs (on the first page of the thread).

In Tony Russell's "Country Music Originals" the entry on Dock Boggs quotes a Jon Pankake essay thus: "Today Dock in his old age moves easily through the modern world of...Carnegie Hall audiences and Newport ovations and television interviews."

My question, anyone seen or know anything about those television interviews? I believe there are audio interviews of Boggs out there but did not know about TV bits. As far as I can tell, they haven't been YouTubed or anything.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2010, 01:30:18 PM by uncle bud »

Offline Lyle Lofgren

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #18 on: April 09, 2010, 02:23:50 PM »
What the TV reference refers to (one example is enough, after all) is the Walker Art Center Folk Music in America series (1964 - 1966). In 1964, both Dock Boggs and Roscoe Holcomb appeared on local Minneapolis television to talk about their upcoming appearance in the series. I'm sure there's no YouTube about it, but you can see some pictures we took at the time at http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/BrnSnift/PhotoAlbum.html .

By the way, it's Jon Pankake, not Jan -- he's of German, not Dutch, descent.

Lyle

Offline uncle bud

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #19 on: April 09, 2010, 02:59:38 PM »
Thanks for the information, Lyle. And I get to look at those great photos again. BTW, I knew Jon's name, my only excuse is spastic typing...

Offline banjochris

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #20 on: April 09, 2010, 05:10:37 PM »
What the TV reference refers to (one example is enough, after all) is the Walker Art Center Folk Music in America series (1964 - 1966). In 1964, both Dock Boggs and Roscoe Holcomb appeared on local Minneapolis television to talk about their upcoming appearance in the series. I'm sure there's no YouTube about it, but you can see some pictures we took at the time at http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/BrnSnift/PhotoAlbum.html .

By the way, it's Jon Pankake, not Jan -- he's of German, not Dutch, descent.

Lyle

Do you remember if they were interviewed on film or live in the studio? If it's the former, the station they were on might still have it.
Chris

Offline Lyle Lofgren

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #21 on: April 09, 2010, 07:25:35 PM »
I wasn't present, so I can't say for sure. It was most likely live, one of those local "what's doing in town" programs that TV stations ran before they cut back on local shows. I doubt they would have bothered to film it in advance back then. I also don't know which station ran it. 1964 was a long time ago.

Lyle

Offline banjochris

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #22 on: April 09, 2010, 11:54:42 PM »
Yeah, the odds of it surviving would be slim if it were on film, and zero any other way. It sure would be nice if there were some more footage of Dock around (or Roscoe too, but at least there's quite a bit of him available).

Offline uncle bud

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2010, 09:56:15 AM »
While we're on the subject of old-time banjo, I've have been listening to Roscoe Holcomb in concert from 1963 at Ash Grove. Two short sets are available at Wolfgang's Vault, where you can listen online (free registration required). http://www.wolfgangsvault.com/roscoe-holcomb/

The concerts also feature several tunes on guitar from Roscoe played in that inimitable style of his.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2010, 10:11:52 AM by uncle bud »

Offline Johnm

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #24 on: May 05, 2014, 06:53:51 PM »
Hi all,
I've been listening to Hobart Smith a lot lately, especially the CD "Hobart Smith-In Sacred Trust-The 1963 Fleming Brown Tapes", Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40141.  His version of "Wabash Blues" (not the Trad Jazz Standard) is on that CD, and the liner notes relate that he had not played the tune for 10 years prior to recording it . . . and that when it was played for his adult children in 1992, none of them recognized it.  What a thing to be able to rip through a tune from the distant past the way Hobart Smith does here.  The tuning for the song is one he evidently employed for no other tune:  e low octave AACD, to play a tune in A natural minor.  I guess this one qualifies for the minor blues thread, too, Pan.



All best,
Johnm

Offline frailer24

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #25 on: May 05, 2014, 10:54:21 PM »
The tune is easy, the rhythm, however, can be tricky. A favorite of mine.
That's all she wrote Mabel!

Offline frankie

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2014, 04:42:31 AM »
His version of "Wabash Blues"

I was listening to this CD a lot around August last year, and felt then that the melody to Wabash Blues was very similar to the Roustabout that Mike Seeger got from Josh Thomas...  imagine my surprise to find THIS on YT:



The tuning for this, relative his actual pitch, is g C G B-flat D. Minor!

Offline uncle bud

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Re: old-time banjo
« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2014, 08:15:59 PM »
Where did this come from? Very cool.

 


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