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Bluegrass sounds better than it is. Old-time is better than it sounds - Frank Basile, on how to distinguish Oldtime music from Bluegrass

Author Topic: Introductions: When the Roll is called...  (Read 144304 times)

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Offline frankie

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    • DoneGone.net
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #45 on: December 10, 2004, 03:34:10 PM »
which I use to try and warn some poor soul that I'm about to blab away.   ;D

Like a shot across the bow - consider yourself warned! <g>

Offline cmr

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    • Geological Sciences (work)
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #46 on: December 11, 2004, 05:27:06 PM »
Although I rarely post on web forums, my name is charlie and use cmr as my login name.  I have been playing the guitar for almost 4 years, mostly catching up on music that I listened to during a long time ago.  My first exposure to country blues was a Big Bill Broonzy album that I purchased in 8th grade (circa 1965).  By 9th grade, we were listening to Dave Van Ronk in small clubs in NYC.  In NYC high school, a few of my friends played John Hurt, Gary Davis, Doc Watson, and some ragtime blues.  At this time, I was a classically trained violinist, but never could play the guitar.  I even hosted a pre-war blues and country music show on my college radio station.  I gave up trying to play the guitar, since it was impossible to get the bouncy sound of Big Bill Broonzy or Blind Blake.  After two years of college, skiing and mountain climbing took me to the west coast.  Finally, when I turned 50, my daughters gave me a Martin D18 guitar as a gift.  Now after a 30 year hiatus, I am playing again.  Not sure when, but I found this website in the fall of '2004.   Charlie

Offline Slack

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #47 on: December 11, 2004, 06:15:43 PM »
Welcome Charlie!

Funny how many of us put the guitar down for such a long period time - having other priorities in life like trying to make a living and raising kids (which are certainly worthwhile pursuits!) - only to return.  I tell ya, I have a lot more patience with myself than I did at 20... but wish I'd found a way to keep playing. 

Cheers,
slack

boots

  • Guest
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #48 on: December 13, 2004, 01:33:14 AM »
Welcome Charlie!

Funny how many of us put the guitar down for such a long period time - having other priorities in life like trying to make a living and raising kids (which are certainly worthwhile pursuits!) - only to return.  I tell ya, I have a lot more patience with myself than I did at 20... but wish I'd found a way to keep playing. 

Cheers,
slack

A lot of us seem to be in this boat - even though we don't play guitar. :(

Boots

iplayamartin0016

  • Guest
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #49 on: December 14, 2004, 07:55:40 PM »
I'm Randall Bott

I've been on Weenie on and off since it was called Blind Weenie.  I've worked at UPS for 30 years (I'm 48 now) and have a blog where I talk about my life and my music.  I've been to the Fur Peace Ranch twice (with Roy Book Binder, Jorma, and Alvin Hart) and I'm starting to the hang of this guitar thing.  When I retire in 3years 2 months and 11 days I plan to go to Port Townsend.  Until then I just can't get away.

This is the best forum I've seen bar none.  I do more lurking that I should because I know so little in comparison to everyone else.  I'm a big Pink Anderson fan and have been listening to a lot of Lonnie Johnson and Sam Chatmon.  If you want ot know more read the blog.
 
http://www.leastbest.blog-city.com

boots

  • Guest
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #50 on: December 15, 2004, 08:49:57 AM »
Hi! Randall,
No concern. Some people don't know as much and can't play anything at all.

Boots  :)
« Last Edit: December 15, 2004, 11:53:59 AM by boots »

Offline Rats in my Kitchen

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  • Howdy!
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #51 on: December 21, 2004, 08:12:58 AM »
Hi. My name is Neal but here I go by Rats in my Kitchen, thinking of Sleepy John Estes. I don't play but I love old blues, in fact old jazz, old country, old gospel, and old Cajun/Creole music too. My hobby is running a Web site with mp3s of Cajun music at http://npmusic.org There are some 1920-1930s selections under that heading and under Joseph Falcon as well.

I recognize Ryan's name from the Yahoo group for John Fahey.

I saw reference to Joe Bussard. He lives in my area and I visit with him every couple of months. He's a great resource of music and information.

Offline Slack

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #52 on: December 21, 2004, 08:32:18 AM »
Welcome Neal!   Nice website - and I like your mission!

Cheers,
slack

boots

  • Guest
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #53 on: December 21, 2004, 09:45:48 AM »
Hi! Neal,
Nice to have you on the non-playing wing.

Boots

Offline SteveMcBill

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  • This too shall pass! So grab it while you can!
    • Steve Mc's Acoustic Guitar
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #54 on: January 01, 2005, 06:35:18 AM »
Hi,

My name is Steve and my playing journey began in the late 1960's when I went out with a girl who strummed and sang in church - I remember one night she made me hold the guitar and pushed my fingers into a 'C' shape (1st position) to take a photograph - I couldn't believe anybody would do that for fun - my God but it was uncomfortable.

A few years later I had left home and wanted something to do in the evenings - TV had the usual range of garbage and anyway I didn't have the cash or inclination to buy one. I thought of a musical instrument and remembered the girl in church. I also considered drums and electric guitar but as I didn't know any other musos I couldn't form or join a band and living in an end-terrace house meant that noise could easily be a problem. Just before making the final decision I noticed an obituary column for Rev Gary Davis (the famous ragtime guitarist) in the latest copy of the Music Express newspaper. I went into Chester (UK) that weekend and in Dawson's Music Shop saw 2 Rev Gary Davis LP's cling-filmed together for the price of one. I bought them and took them home and slapped the ragtime one on the deck. For the next 2 hours I sat there with my mouth open. How can anyone play an acoustic guitar like that - it was so new to me it was amazing and life changing. I now knew what instrument I wanted. I went and purchased a Giannini nylon-strung craviola (easy on the fingers - no one to give me any guidance) and a couple of months later a Yamaha steel-strung FG180.

About 12 months later (and having got nowhere in my quest to play Gary's music - just a few chords and pattern picking learnt) I was in work and down in the coffee lounge for morning break. A girl had brought a classical guitar in for me to tune (she had bought it 2 weeks previously and it was in tune when she bought it (she said)). While tuning it another work colleague came in (Kieran Fish) and asked if he could have a go - passed the guitar over and he proceeded to play Candyman, West Coast Blues and a number of others - I couldn't believe it. Kiearn told me he had leaned from a chap in Warrington and had picked up Stefan Grossman's How To Play Country Blues LP (on the Xtra label) which had tablature to a number of blues songs. So began an association with CB and with Kieran (who never showed me a damned thing.).

I began to have a regular meet at my house on Tuesday evenings - Kieran was a regular and other people included Alan Paddick, Mike Martin, Chris Cassidy, Martin Bell, Joe Cainen, Ian Jesses, and many others. After meeting more like minded people at a club in a house basement in Manchester we developed T'n'T (the Tape 'n' Tab Club) which met 4 or 5 times per year with everybody sleeping on the floor for the weekend, drinking a lot and playing 'till our fingers were red raw. Sunday morning was given over to recording, swapping arrangements as tab and on tape, and generally helping other players to play what you could. Great times - and it was during this period that Kicking Mule began to release LPs in the UK. Kieran and I moved into playing some of the ragtime duets and began to arrange our own rags from the original piano music.

Mike Martin became interested and as he was of Irish extraction gravitated to Celtic music - he produced some superb arrangements after joining forces with his father who he then found out had been an Irish Dancing tutor/judge in Ireland in his younger days.

After about 5 years or so the T'n'T came to an end as people got married, moved away, had kids and generally let life take over. I joined forces with Ian Jesse and we played pubs, parties and a couple of schools with some CB, some folk and some of Ian's own compositions. Life changed again in the late 1990s and Ian joined forces with another young player playing pubs andcovering Simon & Garfunkel and acoustic rock numbers.

I began to teach fingerpicking guitar at Halewood Comprehensive School Evening classes and this led to the formation of a strong group of players meeting every week in a pub in Gateacre, Liverpool. Great to pass the muse on, especially as they have a strong core of CB players.

Since then I have developed arthritis in both shoulders (worse in my right) and also fibromyalgia in my right upper-arm which now means I cannot get my right arm over the guitar to pick without a lot of pain. Consequently, I haven't played for about 4 to 5 years - BUT I MUST start again - If I don't then I will never play again as age makes things worse - I cannot allow that to happen.

I still pass on as much as I can and have tabbed out a fair few of the tunes from the T'n'T days and made them available in TablEdit format on my web-site at: www.consult-eco.ndirect.co.uk/guitar/tab.htm

Guitars: my main is a large cut-away Dinsdale and I also own a 00 model made by him, as well as a metal bodied Dobro resonator and a Yamaha electro-acoustic which I used for 'playing out'.

Found out about Weenie Campbell a couple of days after Xmas 2004 on the Grossman Woodshed site by reading some back posts.

All the best for 2005 folks - here's hoping you all get to make and hear some beautiful music. Wish I could get over for the get-together - will have to try over the next few years.

Take care, and keep on pluckin'.

Steve.

Offline Bluesymel

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  • Posts: 54
  • Love the Blues!
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #55 on: January 01, 2005, 10:26:01 AM »
Hi,
My name is Mel. I have been trying to learn to play Country Blues. I use Stefan Grossman material. I have no music theory and I don't read music. Quite mechanical from tab only. I play a 1973 Martin D35 that I am the original owner of. However I only played for two years back in 73' when I bought the guitar and then put in it's case unfortunately for about 28 years. I finally decided to practice again a couple of years ago. Anyway I don't know how to post my music so I have included a link to 3 one minute samples of my playing. Appreciate any criticism. I can take it.
Mel
Just use the Hifi link to listen and you won't have to register
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/writePage.cfm?myType=music&bandid=230905&bandnamesave=melaxelrod

Offline Slack

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #56 on: January 01, 2005, 11:31:58 AM »
Welcome Bluesymel!

A link is just as good as uploading.  I assume you've read "When the Roll is Called"(our pinned topic for introductions, so I'll move yours there)) and read similar stories of putting down the guitar for years and then picking it back up - quite common. 

Anyway, your playing sounds very good, impressive that you've only been playing a couple of years!

cheers,
slack





« Last Edit: January 01, 2005, 11:33:48 AM by Slack »

SugarJ

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #57 on: January 03, 2005, 01:38:01 AM »
Wanted to thank Steve McBill for introducing me to this forum, I LOVE THIS PLACE !!!   

I am a perpetual student from Dallas Texas...  lol  I like Telecasters, resonator guitars, old 78's, junkin' in my pickup truck, and of course, Country Blues.

It's like an epiphany, all my life, I knew that there was something, and I then I came here, and I suddenly realized...  I'm a Weenie!  lol

Look forward to meeting you all and sharing our love for the music.

Peace. 

 O0

Offline Slack

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Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #58 on: January 03, 2005, 08:30:20 AM »
Welcome SugarJ and  also welcome to the rest of you closet Weenies coming from the IGS Guitar forum!

We are a little overwhelmed at the moment from seeing 45 resgistrations in 3 days - our previous high was 46 registrations in a month!  But I think we'll recover.

Again, welcome - we're glad to have you.

Cheers,
slack

Edited to Add:  And Welcome from the Woodshed forum also!



« Last Edit: January 03, 2005, 09:18:03 AM by Slack »

Offline GhostRider

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  • That'll never happen no more!
Re: Introductions: When the Roll is called...
« Reply #59 on: January 03, 2005, 09:37:28 AM »
Howdy:

Yes, welcome all.

Alex

 


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