The Unwound Third > Jam Session

Backup your backup

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Rivers:

--- Quote from: DerZauberer on April 24, 2018, 03:20:02 AM ---but that little USB drive contains just sooo much great stuff

--- End quote ---

Just a word to the wise... make sure you have at least one back up of the drive. I lost a USB flash drive just this week and it cost me a lot of time. They are extremely prone to irrecoverable data corruption.

Stuart:

--- Quote from: Rivers on April 25, 2018, 05:50:58 AM ---Just a word to the wise... make sure you have at least one back up of the drive. I lost a USB flash drive just this week and it cost me a lot of time. They are extremely prone to irrecoverable data corruption.
--- End quote ---

Ain't that the truth. We all  know how to backup our files, folders, drives, etc., but doing it on a regular basis is another matter. Sometime ago I stumbled on DSyncronize, which is a simple free program that works for me:

http://dimio.altervista.org/eng/dsynchronize/dsynchronize.html

There are plenty of other utilities like it out there, but its simplicity is what appeals to me.

Rivers:
This is a good topic for the Unwound Third so I'll split it off to there.

The reason I lost a lot of time over a USB stick was having to reformat the hard drive on my macbook due to long-existing minor corruption in the system partition. This was causing no real problems until attempting to install the new macOS High Sierra, which puked when it saw the bad SSD and wouldn't unmount the drive.

I tried everything I could google to fix it without disturbing the 6 years of apps and data sitting on it but no dice, time to initialize the disk. Did some cleanup prep, more backups, and made a bootable version of Sierra and High Sierra on USB flash drives.

I keep mission critical stuff replicated on iCloud and use automated Time Machine for hourly incremental backups to a Synology NAS with terabytes of space on it, fabulous. So I'm all set. To cut a long story short, I blitzed the drive (scary) and successfully reinstalled the OS from the Sierra USB stick. I had a brand new macOS Sierra m/c with nothing on it but Apple apps. Checked I could get to iCloud files and the NAS Time Machine backups, AOK

Time to run the installer on the second USB stick to get it to High Sierra. Phut! Completely unreadable. No problem, I'll just grab the installer from the Time Machine backup, thinks I. But... Time Machine doesn't back up installer files since they're so big. I learned something the hard way.

Next frustration was right on cue, our internet connection started running at about 12% of its normal speed. It's slow at the best of times since we're rural but 0.5 Mbps is ridiculous. When I started downloading High Sierra from the App Store estimated completion times were like 2 or 3 days...

Next day I was telling Cheryl about the High Sierra USB stick crash and the still-running download from the App Store. She says "No problem, I've got the installer on my machine". Phew. So I cancel the download, she puts the installer on the NAS, I grab it and run it. 40 minutes later my mac's at High Sierra without a squeak of protest.

Now I just have to reinstall Office 365, Adobe Illustrator + Photoshop + Light Room + Acro Reader, Sketchup... onwards and upwards.

Stuart:
Several years ago (perhaps closer to ten--I searched and couldn't find anything) I believe I posted something about DiskWarrior, a program my son uses:

https://www.alsoft.com/DiskWarrior/

He said it was the best and had to use it several times to whip things back into shape on the ol' HDD. It might be worth checking out.

Rivers:
That looks like a useful tool to have handy for both crisis situations and for regular maintenance and monitoring. The error I was getting when running Disk Utility > First Aid indicated corruption. I did not see that one listed on their website of system errors it can handle. I think I was probably doomed to initializing it. Now it's all done, bar reinstalling apps, I feel pretty good about it. Touch wood.

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