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Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 95717 times)

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Offline blueshome

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1995 on: November 25, 2018, 03:00:24 AM »
Having got round to it with a guitar and better speakers than my phone at last, Im with the Professor.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1996 on: November 27, 2018, 08:47:51 AM »
Hi all,
It appears that everyone who intended to respond to the puzzler on John Lee Hooker's "Slim's Stomp" has done so by now, so I will post the answers.

For Texas Slim's (John Lee Hooker's) "Slim's Stomp":
   * His playing position was Spanish tuning, as all who responded had it--well done!  It ends up being capoed around the seventh fret on my guitar.  Of course, if John Lee was tuned to Spanish at A, it would gain him some neck and place the capo two frets lower than I had it, for I was tuned to Spanish at G.
   * From :05--:12, John Lee Hooker is hitting the open third string and then answering it, first with the third fret of the fifth string and then with the first fret of the sixth string.  Naming those notes, assuming Spanish tuned at G with no capo on, you get G for the open third string, which is the key center, Bb for the third fret of the fifth string, the bIII in the key of G, and Eb for the first fret of the sixth string, a bVI note in G.  The three notes actually form an Eb major chord, struck in this order:  3-5-R. 
   To me, this little lick is the most remarkable thing in the whole piece.  I have never heard anyone else play anything like it in Spanish tuning.  Eb major is so remote from G major, that when I first heard the lick, i had one of those "You can't get there from here!" responses.  All credit to John Lee Hooker for originality and big ears.
   * For the passage beginning at :39, Prof Scratchy nailed one way of playing it, spot on the money.  The notes are bent fifth fret of the fifth string which is then released to its unbent pitch, third fret of the fifth string, open 5th string or fifth fret of the sixth string as the Prof had it, then returning to third fret of the fifth string.  Named as scale degrees the run is #IV-IV-bIII-I-bIII.  I think this run is much easier to hear than the :05--:12 lick--it has less of the "unmoored" quality of the earlier lick.  Well done, Prof!
   * At 1:49, the double stop that John Lee Hooker is hitting in the treble is the fifth fret of the first two strings, which suggest either a IV chord or a I6 chord.

In many ways, "Slim's Stomp" reminds me of the music of Ornette Coleman.  By maintaining a steady pulse, but retaining the freedom to play phrases of different lengths and spritz on an idea as long as his fancy dictates, John Lee Hooker operates in a realm of much greater freedom than he would have if he adhered strictly to conventional blues forms of whatever stripe.  He also avoids the predictability enforced by metric regularity, knowing when the IV and V chords are going to arrive in the form, etc.  The extent of the degree of freedom within which he is operating, and his own comfort with that degree of freedom make for a really exciting take which operates in a realm of being perpetually in the "now!".

Thanks to all who participated in the puzzler, and I hope folks enjoyed "Slim's Stomp".  Thanks again, also, to Lightnin' for recommending the tune and to Lindy for finding it on youtube.

All best,
Johnm   
« Last Edit: November 27, 2018, 04:03:58 PM by Johnm »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1997 on: December 05, 2018, 01:36:21 PM »
Hi all,
I have a new puzzler for those of you who are interested.  It is Carolina Slim's "I'll Get By Somehow".  Here it is:



The questions on "I'll Get By Somehow" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Carolina Slim use to play the song?
   * Where did Carolina Slim fret the descending run he plays in the treble from :53--:55?
   * How did Carolina Slim play and fret the passage near the end of his solo, in the bass, from 1:27--1:30?

Please use only your ears and your guitars to arrive at your answers, and please don't post any answers before 8:00 AM your time on Saturday, December 8.  Thanks for your participation, and I hope you enjoy "I'll Get By Somehow".
All best,
Johnm

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1998 on: December 10, 2018, 06:34:00 AM »
Hi all,
Any takers for the Carolina Slim puzzler, "I'll Get By Somehow"?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #1999 on: December 10, 2018, 11:38:48 AM »
* What playing position/tuning did Carolina Slim use to play the song? - G standard tuned low
   * Where did Carolina Slim fret the descending run he plays in the treble from :53--:55? - 1str 3fr/1fr; 2str 3fr/1fr; 3str 3fr bend/ open
   * How did Carolina Slim play and fret the passage near the end of his solo, in the bass, from 1:27-- - against open 4str he descends on 5str 5fr/4fr/3fr 3fr; 6str 3fr



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 11:40:24 AM by Prof Scratchy »

Offline Old Man Ned

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2000 on: December 10, 2018, 12:41:42 PM »
I'm hearing this in G standard too and in agreement with the Prof on the descending run he plays in the treble from :53--:55.

For the descending run he plays in the treble from :53--:55, I'm also hearing this played against then open 4th string but hearing the 5th, 4th, 3rd and 2nd fret of the 5th string before the 3rd fret of the 6th string, though I find myself wanting to play the b flat on 5th string in place of the b which I think I'm hearing.

Offline blueshome

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2001 on: December 13, 2018, 02:19:58 AM »
Well low out of G standard and everything the Prof says.
Its like a cross  between Lightnin and BBFuller, especially Fuller like on the turnaround.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2002 on: December 15, 2018, 08:57:02 AM »
Hi all,
It appears that everyone who intended to respond to the puzzler on Carolina Slim's "I'll Get By Somehow" has done so by now, so I will post the answers.

For Carolina Slim's "I'll Get By Somehow":
   * His playing position was G position in standard tuning, as all who responded had it--well done!
   * The descending treble run that Carolina Slim played from :53--:55 is just as Prof Scratchy had it--third fret of the first string to first fret of the first string, to third fret of the second string to first fret of the second string, to third fret of the third string.  The run is a descending "blues scale", I-bVII-V-IV-bIII, and it sits so naturally for the left hand in G in standard tuning that it became a staple of so many players there.  All who responded had this spot on.
   * The movement in the bass from 1:27--1:30 involved droning on the open fourth string while first sliding into a unison at the fifth fret of the fifth string and then walking down the fifth string chromatically, from fifth to fourth to third to second fret, at which point the bass moves to the third fret of the sixth string.  It is a turn-around that Blind Boy Fuller utilized, as blueshome noted.

For anyone who is interested, this song strikes me as one that could be figured out by ear relatively easily.  I guess the only question is whether it appeals to you.  Thanks to Prof Scratchy, Old Man Ned and blueshome for their responses to the puzzler and I hope folks enjoyed the song.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2003 on: January 03, 2019, 09:28:01 AM »
Hi all,
We haven't had a new puzzler for a little while, so I have picked one out for those of you who are interested.  It is J. T. Smith's song "Corn Whiskey Blues":  Here it is:



The questions on J. T. Smith's "Corn Whiskey Blues" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did he use to play the song?
   * Where did J. T. Smith fret what he played in his intro, from :00--:05?
   * What chords does J. T. Smith play in the last two bars of his verses, naming the chords with Roman numerals?
   * Where did J. T. Smith fret the ascending/descending fill he played from 1:03--1:05?

Please use only your ears and your guitars to arrive at your answers.  Please don't post any answers before 8:00 AM your time on Sunday, January 6.  Thanks for participating, and I hope you enjoy the song.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2004 on: January 08, 2019, 08:46:32 AM »
Hi all,
Any takers for the puzzler on J. T. Smith's "Corn Whiskey Blues"?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm

Offline eric

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2005 on: January 08, 2019, 10:18:01 AM »
So far I'm batting about .125 on these, but here I think he's in E position standard tuning and the intro run starts at 12th fret first string down to the 7th fret.  Still working on the rest.  I don't play in E much. Anyway, Funny Papa Smith is a great player.
--
Eric

Offline Old Man Ned

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2006 on: January 08, 2019, 12:31:42 PM »
I'm hearing  J. T. Smith's "Corn Whiskey Blues" in E standard, about a half step sharp.
His intro, from :00--:05 goes from the 12th fret 1st and 3rd strings, down to the 7th fret and then down to the 4th fret accompanied by the open e string in the bass

I'm struggling with the chords played in the last two bars of his verses, there's something a little unusual (to my ears) that's throwing me.

The ascending/descending fill he played from 1:03--1:05 is something like on the top 4 strings:
----------0-----------
------0------2--0-------
0h1----------------1h2---
--------------------------2

Need to revisit the 3rd part of the puzzler.

All the best,
Ned

Offline Prof Scratchy

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2007 on: January 10, 2019, 03:40:31 AM »
 * What playing position/tuning did he use to play the song? - E standard
   * Where did J. T. Smith fret what he played in his intro, from :00--:05? - keeps steady bass on low E string against an abbreviated E chord in the long A inversion at the ninth fret (pinkie on 1str 12fr), then descending to 0xx757, then to0xx434
   * What chords does J. T. Smith play in the last two bars of his verses, naming the chords with Roman numerals? - not sure of the roman numerals, but does he just go from e to an abbreviated d7 chord with e in the bass (0xx210), then back to e? Alternatively it could be an Am or IVm he's playing here?
   * Where did J. T. Smith fret the ascending/descending fill he played from 1:03--1:05? - ???

« Last Edit: January 10, 2019, 07:40:30 AM by Prof Scratchy »

Offline Pan

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2008 on: January 10, 2019, 03:38:39 PM »
Hi all,

I'll agree with the others about E position in std tuning.

I think the intro is basically a double stop with the 3rd and the 1st strings played at the same fret, starting with the 12th fret, then at the 7th, and then at the 4th fret. Pretty much as Old Man Ned described, only on the 12th fret position I hear Smith rocking back and forth with the 3rd and 2nd string. The open 6th string is played against the 7th and 4th fret positions, if I'm not mistaken.

I'll agree with Prof. Scratchy on the IVm chord on the ending. I hear the open 5th string on the bass. 

 | I  IVm | I ||

As for the fill, I think he starts on the 1st fret of the 3rd string; followed by the open 2nd string, then 2nd string 2nd fret; then a triplet with the open 1st string, 2nd string 2nd fret, and the ope 2nd string; followed by a hammer on from the open 3rd string to the 1st fret; and the 4th string 2nd fret.

Looking forward to hear the verdict.

Cheers,

Pan
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 05:39:07 AM by Pan »

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2009 on: January 12, 2019, 09:04:47 AM »
Hi all,
Any other takers for the puzzler on J. T. Smith's "Corn Whiskey Blues"?
All best,
Johnm