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You know if I don't go crazy, God knows, I believe I'"m gonna lose my mind. - Hammie Nixon, Yellow Yam Blues

Recent Posts

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22
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Barbecue Bob Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on June 22, 2019, 05:04:52 PM »
Hi all,
For "Brown Skin Girl", Barbecue Bob once again accompanied himself in Spanish tuning.  It's a little hard to hear, but Barbecue Bob is playing the melody with the slide in unison with his vocal, from the beginning to the end of the song, and that's not easy to do!  The song has an unusual refrain, with a kind of one-and-a-half length.  I wonder if "ginger bus" is a misunderstanding/mishearing of "jitney bus".  Here is the song:



INTRO

Now if a brownskin woman got a dollar in her hand, she takes two bits for herself and six bits for her man
REFRAIN: A brownskin woman, best brownie after all
They will stick by you, winter, summer, spring, and fall
A brownskin woman, best brownie after all

High yella woman, she can have her things, but she tell all you mens, "I ain't putting out a thing."
REFRAIN: A brownskin woman, best brownie after all
They will stick by you, winter, summer, spring, and fall
A brownskin woman, best brownie after all

High yella, she'll cheat you, that ain't all, when you step out at night, another mule in your stall
REFRAIN: A brownskin woman, best brownie after all
They will stick by you, winter, summer, spring, and fall
A brownskin woman, best brownie after all

Anybody tell you brownskin gal's all right, high yella get twenty-five, it dries up like tripe
REFRAIN: A brownskin woman, best brownie after all
They will stick by you, winter, summer, spring, and fall
A brownskin woman, best brownie after all

See that spider crawling up the wall?  He's going up there to get his ashes hauled
REFRAIN: A brownskin woman, best brownie after all
They will stick by you, winter, summer, spring, and fall
A brownskin woman, best brownie after all

Ashes to ashes and dust to dust, if you can't ride your train, catch a ginger bus
REFRAIN: A brownskin woman, best brownie after all
They will stick by you, winter, summer, spring, and fall
A brownskin woman, best brownie after all

Stop 'n' let me tell you what a yella will do, she beat you out your money and make a fool out of you
REFRAIN: A brownskin woman, best brownie after all
They will stick by you, winter, summer, spring, and fall
A brownskin woman, best brownie after all

SOLO

All best,
Johnm
23
Phonograph Blues too.
24


Conforth and Wardlow observe that (with one exception) whenever two takes of a song survive, they are identical in timing, text and arrangement.


The above does not apply to the two versions of Crossroads, nor to the two versions of Rambling On My Mind.




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
25
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Last post by Johnm on June 22, 2019, 09:11:49 AM »
Hi all,
The Willie Trice puzzler on "Shine On" has been up for a good while now and has generated several responses, so I'll post the answers.

For Willie Trice's "Shine On":
   * His playing position was E position in standard tuning, as every response had it.  Well done!
   * His form for "Shine On" was nine bars long, for a lyric and melody that would normally be phrased in eight bars.  Blueshome had the long place in Willie Trice's form accurately spotted--it is the fifth bar, where he resolves to a musically extraneous bar of the I chord.  In such songs, the vocal phrase for the last four bars normally starts in the tail end of the fourth bar, the second bar of the IV chord.  Willie Trice finishes up his IV chord, adds the extra bar of I, and starts singing the final phrase in the tail end of that measure.  His phrasing is not "wrong", but it is specific to him.
   * The two chords that Willie Trice played in the seventh bar of the form are an F#7 (II7) and a B7 (V7).  Doing it this way, he gets a II-V- I resolution, going from the seventh bar to the eighth bar, a sound that Carl Martin and Little Hat Jones also employed in E.  Joe paul had the F#7 properly identified.  One of the neat things about doing the F#7 in this context is that the seventh of the chord ends up being the open first string, so you can do a thumb-wrapped F leaving the first string open and move it up one fret and you have the chord (though Willie Trice never sounds the second fret of the sixth string).

Thanks to all who participated, and I hope folks enjoyed "Shine On".  I'll look for another song to post soon.
All best,
Johnm
26
It leaves me wondering if his playing in juke joints, corners, etc. were three minutes or longer like I assume all the others played.

Conforth and Wardlow observe that (with one exception) whenever two takes of a song survive, they are identical in timing, text and arrangement.

For what it's worth, my guess is that he'd employ flexibility with the rest of his repertoire, but keep the recorded songs as they were on the discs. We hear that ? at least once ? he performed Terraplane Blues to prove that he was the man on the record. It's a fair guess that he did a three-minute version.
27
Our friend Annie Raines demoing the current Hohner harp line, fine-tuned sense of humor and natural talent:

28
Jam Session / Re: Theorbo
« Last post by Rivers on June 21, 2019, 11:04:42 PM »
Wow, mind thoroughly blown. Elizabeth Kenny is an amazingly cool person.
More on the instrument here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theorbo

Questions I have are what was the extended neck made from to keep it light enough for the instrument to remain in balance, and how is it tuned, particularly the four unfrettable bass strings.

Since it's probably right up his street I hope David Lindley picks one up at some point.
29
Jam Session / sacred geometry
« Last post by Rivers on June 21, 2019, 09:34:45 PM »
I'm sure you know about Stonehenge being on a ley line (or two), and the heel stone lining-up with the sunset on the summer solstice, and all that jazz? You can read about it in John Michell's The View Over Atlantis. That was a book that blew my mind back in 1969. Admittedly my mind was constantly being blown back then, and on a good day it still is.

Anyway, check this out. This is the sun setting on the summer solstice today, here in upstate new york. It's the sun going down in the gap between our corn silo and the big barn, in perfect alignment with our front porch:
30
Weenie Campbell Main Forum / Re: Quote Drive 2019
« Last post by harry on June 21, 2019, 03:07:29 PM »
"Bebop? Avant-garde? Yeah, I heard of them. I also heard of these kids called the Bright Brothers ? Wright Brothers? Who claim they can make you fly. It'll never catch on, none of it".

- Art Hodes
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