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I cried last night and I cried all night before. Like a fool! And I said that I ain't gonna cry no more. No more! If he can stand to leave me, I can stand to see him go. I said "Go"! - Bessie Smith, Hateful Blues, 1924

Recent Posts

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91
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Last post by Johnm on August 22, 2019, 09:15:02 AM »
Hi all,
Any takers for the Smith Casey puzzler, "Santa Fe Blues"?  Come one, come all!
All best,
Johnm
92
Down the Dirt Road / Re: Other Musical Interests on YouTube
« Last post by lindy on August 20, 2019, 09:48:01 AM »
On another thread today someone mentioned Radio Bristol ... here's an example of the content you'll find if you pay a visit:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=80&v=RJpUdHlHEYA

Lots of other good vids on the Radio Bristol youtube channel.
93
Other Musical Interests / Re: Bristol Sessions travel article
« Last post by lindy on August 20, 2019, 09:39:05 AM »
Since the demise of Weenie Juke Radio, I often listen to Radio Bristol Classic. Recommended.

https://www.birthplaceofcountrymusic.org/radio/

94
Other Musical Interests / Re: Bristol Sessions travel article
« Last post by Johnm on August 20, 2019, 06:29:06 AM »
Hi all,
I remember reading that the performer who recorded the most titles at the Bristol Sessions was neither future stars the Carter Family nor Jimmie Rodgers, but rather Alfred Karnes, who never recorded commercially again.  I sure wish he had, because I love his titles from those sessions.
All best,
Johnm
95
It's not really the information you're seeking, but Bahaman guitar maestro Joseph Spence played mainly -- and always for his show pieces -- out of a tuning in which the bass E was dropped to D. There are quite a few recordings of him.
96
Other Musical Interests / Bristol Sessions travel article
« Last post by Prof Scratchy on August 20, 2019, 12:56:37 AM »
Since the demise of Weenie Juke Radio, I often listen to Radio Bristol Classic. Recommended. Also, Bristol is home to Bigtone Records, run by Jon Atkinson. He uses old style recording equipment and methods. Thomas8 of this parish recently recorded there.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
97
Other Musical Interests / Re: Bristol Sessions travel article
« Last post by Stuart on August 19, 2019, 09:36:54 AM »
Thank you, Lindy. It appears in the Travel section of the NY Times and the author is a freelance writer, so my take is that it is both an intro to the musical history of the area and also a narrative of her travel through the region woven together. If it gets people to visit the area and listen to the music, then so much the better.

"The tapes would become an inflection point in the history of what we now refer to as country music." Jeez, I didn't know Ralph Peer lugged around a tape recorder in addition to his disc cutter.
98
Other Musical Interests / Bristol Sessions travel article
« Last post by lindy on August 19, 2019, 09:01:25 AM »
Kind of a rambling read in my opinion, but worth a few minutes. Always good to see anything that sings the praises of the Carter Family and the Bristol Sessions in the mainstream media ...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/19/travel/ken-burns-country-music.html
99
Hello everyone

I have been writing a blog about Skip James, and It got me thinking about the origins of the mysterious Crossnote tuning he used. It was said that Henry Stuckey got this tuning from African-Bahamian soldiers in the French Army during World War One, and I am looking for a possible piece of audio or film that shows someone from the Bahamas using the same crossnote tuning Skip James used. I find it odd that nothing has really been recorded, or nothing is out there that is from the Caribbean or possibly even Europe where a guitar player is using this tuning. If anyone knows of anything or finds anything, please let me know, as I'd be curious to hear it.
100
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Last post by Johnm on August 17, 2019, 09:58:29 AM »
Hi all,
It has been a while since we've had a puzzler, and I've chosen a new one, Smith Casey's "Santa Fe Blues".  Smith Casey was an inmate at a Texas prison who was recorded by John Lomax and Ruby Terrill Lomax.  Here is "Santa Fe Blues":



The questions on "Santa Fe Blues" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Smith Casey use to play the song?
   * Where did Smith Casey fret the bent note and and the two higher-pitched answering notes in the treble from :04--:08?
   * Where did Smith Casey fret the opening of his solo, from :22--:25?
   * Where did Smith Casey play the notes he is playing in the treble from :30--:35?

Please use only your ears and your guitars to arrive at your answers, and don't post any responses before 8:00 AM your time on Wednesday, August 21.  Thanks for your participation and I hope you enjoy Smith Casey's "Santa Fe Blues".
All best,
Johnm
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