collapse

* Member Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

* Like Us on Facebook

I never saw him drunk, just feelin' good all the time, the better he felt the better he played - Bill Williams on Blind Arthur Blake

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10
61
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Last post by Old Man Ned on October 02, 2019, 01:30:49 PM »
I was wrestling with this one last night and sounds like it got me in the same hold as Prof Scratchy. I've been swithering between E or G in, despite tinkering about with my low strings, I'm going for standard tuning in E.

Really not sure about the bass note....a dampened E on the 6th string at the start and a dampened B(?) on the 6 string for the interlude. Agree, no IV or V chord. Only confident about the last answer though.

All the best,
Ned
62
They were in Edinburgh recently and were outstanding.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using Tapatalk

63
At least one other forum member is familiar with this talented group of musicians:

https://store.dustystrings.com/news.aspx?showArticle=15
64
Saturday Night Fish Fry / Jazz in Seattle - October 2019
« Last post by Stuart on October 02, 2019, 08:12:42 AM »
It Looks like Earshot Jazz is putting on some shows at Town Hall Seattle in October:

https://townhallseattle.org/event-calendar/
65
The Back Porch / Re: Covering the Song, Not the Arrangement
« Last post by RobBob on October 02, 2019, 08:05:11 AM »
One thing I got from listening to observing closely the old masters was that it was not slavish imitation but the realized essence that makes for great blues.  While I have arrangements close to the source, I have revamped, fine tuned and adapted the music to my personal abilities. Listen to Booker White's version of Going Down Slow to know that it is not like the original by St Louis Jimmy but it is his filtered version. This is my take on it, one who after 50 years, still only plays in his local community.  Keeping the blues alive.
66
Super Electrical Recordings! / Re: "Orville Johnson and his Ampliphonic Guitar--Duets"
« Last post by RobBob on October 02, 2019, 07:58:15 AM »
Looks like  great, innovative music.  Love the duet format. It is downloaded, ready to listen.
67
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Last post by Prof Scratchy on October 02, 2019, 01:44:48 AM »
I find these one chord songs the hardest to figure out. It does sound like heís playing in the key of E, but maybe not in standard tuning. The overall feel reminds me of Li Son Jackson, so I wondered if he could be in G6 tuning, tuned low - but thatís just a guess.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
68
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Last post by David Kaatz on October 01, 2019, 09:50:52 PM »
I started trying to play this very briefly yesterday, and now posting after listening to the whole thing, and no guitar in hand.

Key of E, standard tuning.
Opening bass note G#, 4th fret 6th string.
For the guitar interlude, I think he is playing the same G# as above.
True, no IV or V chord.
69
SOTM - Song Of The Month / SOTM October 2019 - Truckin' My Blues Away
« Last post by eric on October 01, 2019, 05:51:49 PM »
The C version of this tune is one of the first rags I learned and is a lot of fun to play.  I was inspired to do this tune for SOTM after John Miller gave a class at PT that explained the progression in C and G.  I associate it with Blind Boy Fuller because he had numerous versions, but there are lots of others.

Here's the progression:


I [III7] / VI7 / II7 V7 / I

I [III7] / VI7 / II7 / V7

I / I7 / IV / Idim

I [III7] / VI7 / II7 V7 / I [V7]

II7 V7 / I

and here's Blind Boy Fuller:



Memphis Minnie


Milton Brown

70
Hi all,
I wanted to let you know that the Song of the Month lesson for October, 2019 at my website is Mance Lipscomb's "One Thin Dime", a hard-driving 16-bar blues that Mance played out of E position in standard tuning.  As was usually the case with Mance, the song abounds with interesting ideas, licks and ways of getting around on the guitar.  The TAB transcription that accompanies the lesson includes Mance's verse one and two accompaniments and the solo that concludes his rendition.  Here is Mance's performance of "One Thin Dime":



Walked all the way from, East St. Louis
Didn't have but the one thin dime
Didn't have but the one thin dime
Didn't have but the one thin dime

'Fore I would spend it for, my own use
Saved it for the girl of mine
Saved it for the girl of mine
Saved it for the girl of mine

When I was sick, couldn't hardly creep
I was sick and couldn't hardly creep
Sick and could not hardly creep
You'd pass by me, wouldn't hardly speak

Tell me, baby, tell me now
Where you been so long?
Where you been so long?
Where you been so long?

All I've got is done gone
All I've got is gone
All I got is gone
Something keep a-tellin' you I won't be here long

Standin' on Decatur Street one day
One dime was all that I had
One dime was all I had
Did not have but the one thin dime

'Fore I would spend it for, my own use
Saved it for the lady friend of mine
Saved it for the lady friend of mine
Saved it for the lady friend of mine

Followed my baby, fur as I could go
Down to the jailhouse door
Down to the jailhouse door
Down to the jailhouse door

I stayed and I heard the papers read
And I heard the papers read
And I heard the papers read
Stayed and I heard what the judge gon' say

SOLO

For the month of October, 2019 only, the lesson is available for $35.00 (U.S. residents only can order a hard copy version of the lesson for $43.00).  You will receive the TAB transcription, very thorough talk-throughs of each section of the song and the song's lyrics transcribed.  To order the lesson, go to my website, www.johnmillerguitar.com , and follow the instructions for ordering the lesson presented in the Teaching section of my website.  Thanks, and I hope you'll take this opportunity to learn Mance Lipscomb's great performance of "One Thin Dime".

All best,
John
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10

anything