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...that's the biggest disaster, people goin' around goin': 'mah baby left me, mommma...' [laughter]. Hel-lo, y'know? It's like absolutely bizarre. Nobody cares whose voice you sing in as long as it yours - Jerry Ricks, Port Townsend 97

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31
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: The Thumb Has It
« Last post by RobBob on February 10, 2020, 06:03:05 AM »
This thread hits a lot of my favorite players. To take it a little off but still on topic, my late friend Will Keys played two finger banjo and he would at times hit the first string with his thumb and his fifth string with his first finger.  He called that "Appalachian long thumb". Watch how his hand works. The banjo was played before guitar.
32
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: The Thumb Has It
« Last post by Johnm on February 09, 2020, 01:33:16 PM »
Hi all,
Here is another prime example of a player employing thumb leads all over the guitar--Clifford Gibson accompanying Sluefoot Joe (Barefoot Bill) on "House Top Blues".  Whew, what spectacular playing!



All best,
Johnm
33
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Willie Lofton Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on February 08, 2020, 09:58:18 AM »
Hi all,
I was able to add links to all of Willie Lofton's recorded songs except "Jake Leg Blues" in this thread, so if you'd like to listen to them, you can.  Apologies if some of the links will not play for non-U.S. weenies.
All best,
Johnm
34
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Leroy Carr Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on February 07, 2020, 03:49:28 PM »
Hi all,
I've been working on an arrangement of (In The Evening) "When The Sun Goes Down" and was surprised to find that it had never been transcribed here.  It is a classic, and deservedly so.  It is so much harder to compose a blues with this kind of staying power than you might think, and Leroy Carr composed more than his fair share, often working with a woman friend who co-wrote with him.  What a soulful and beautiful singer he was!  Listening to his and Scrapper's original recording of the song, at https://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=11988.msg106309#msg106309 , where Gordon had selected it for a Song of the Month a while ago, I was surprised to find how up-tempo Leroy and Scrapper took it, for so many of the covers of it have been quite slow.  In any event, here are Leroy's lyrics.

INTRO

In the evening, in the evening, mama, when the sun goes down
In the evening, baby, when the sun goes down
Well, ain't it lonesome, ain't it lonesome, babe, when your lover's not around, when the sun goes down

Last night, I laid a-sleeping, I was thinking to myself
Last night I laid a-sleeping, I was thinking to myself
Well, wondering and thinking why the one that you love, will mistreat you for someone else, when the sun goes down

The sun rises in the East, and it sets up in the West
The sun rises in the East, mama, and it sets in the West
Well, it's hard to tell, hard to tell, which one will treat you the best, when the sun goes down

Hey-ey-ey-ah, hee-hoo-eee
Hey-ey-ey-ah, hee-hoo-oh
Hey-ey-ey-hi, hoo-oo-ee

Goodbye old sweethearts and pals, yes, I'm going away
But I may be back to see you again, some old rainy day
Well, in the evening, in the evening, babe, when the sun goes down, when the sun goes down

OUTRO

All best,
Johnm

35
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Emry Arthur--"Man of Constant Sorrow"--Emry Arthur Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on February 07, 2020, 12:38:38 PM »
Hi all,
Emry Arthur recorded "Going Around The World" at a session in Indianapolis on June 25, 1928, accompanying himself out of F position in standard tuning and playing harmonica off of a rack.  The song shares its melody and structure with "The Crawdad Song" ("You get a line, and I'll get a pole, honey, etc.)  throughout the song, Arthur employs a "one down--three up" or "boom-chang-chang-chang" back-up style.  Here is the song.

 

HARMONICA SOLO

I'm going around this world, baby mine
I'm goin' around this world, baby mine
I'm goin' around this world with a banjo-pickin' girl
I'm goin' around this world, baby mine

I'm goin' 'cross the ocean, baby mine
I'm goin' 'cross the ocean, baby mine
I'm goin' across the ocean, if I don't change my notion
I'm goin' around this world, baby mine

I'm goin' across the sea, baby mine
I'm a-goin' across the sea, baby mine
I'm goin' across the sea, won't you come and go with me?
I'm goin' around this world, baby mine

HARMONICA SOLO

I'm going to Chattanoogy, baby mine
I'm going to Chattanoogy, baby mine
I'm going to Chattanoogy, get a ticket there for Cuby
I'm goin' around this world, baby mine

I'm workin' by the day, baby mine
I'm workin' by the day, baby mine
I'm workin' by the day, to get money to pay your way
So we can go around this world, baby mine

I'll tell you what I'll do, baby mine
I'll tell you what I'll do, baby mine
I'll tell you what I'll do, I sure will stick to you
And we'll go around this world, baby mine

HARMONICA SOLO

I'm gonna write a letter, baby mine
I'm gonna write a letter, baby mine
I'm a-gonna write a letter, I'll tell 'em that you're better
We're goin' around this world, baby mine

All best,
Johnm




 
36
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Walter Smith Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on February 07, 2020, 12:13:52 PM »
Hi all,
The Carolina Buddies recorded "The Story That The Crow Told Me" at their first session, in New York on March 25, 1930.  The band's personnel for that session had Walter Smith handling the vocal, Posey Rorer the fiddle, Buster Carter the banjo, Lewis McDaniels the guitar, and "unknown" the crow special effect.  Here is the song:



FIDDLE SOLO

Now if you will listen, I'll sing you a song
It's awful funny but it won't last long
All about a crow in a hickory tree
One little story that a crow told me

REFRAIN:  Caw, caw, One little story that a crow told me
Caw, caw, in a hickory tree

FIDDLE SOLO

My gal taken sick, well, the other day
The doctor said she's gonna pass away
I got her a corset at the dry goods store
She's better shape now than she was before

REFRAIN:  Caw, caw, One little story that a crow told me
Caw, caw, in a hickory tree

FIDDLE SOLO

I bought myself a suit of union underwear
To keep me from the cold and chilly air
I wore it six months without a change of ration
And I couldn't get it off 'cause I lost the combination

REFRAIN:  Caw, caw, One little story that a crow told me
Caw, caw, in a hickory tree

FIDDLE SOLO

I had a cow that I dressed in silk
She fell down and sprained her milk
My wife went to milk, for she thought it was a cinch
To milk that cow with a monkey wrench

REFRAIN:  Caw, caw, One little story that a crow told me
Caw, caw, in a hickory tree

FIDDLE SOLO

On a cold winter night, well, I thought I'd breeze
The old white cow, she froze her knee
Sneezed so hard that she caught the croup
Her tail got stiff and she couldn't stoop

REFRAIN:  Caw, caw, One little story that a crow told me
Caw, caw, in a hickory tree

FIDDLE SOLO

Throw back and hook, and give back a line
The fish won't bite in the wintertime
Stood on the ice 'til my feet got cold
Watching the crawfish dig him a hole

REFRAIN:  Caw, caw, One little story that a crow told me
Caw, caw, in a hickory tree

FIDDLE SOLO X 2

All best,
Johnm






37
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Emry Arthur--"Man of Constant Sorrow"--Emry Arthur Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on February 06, 2020, 06:06:54 PM »
Hi all,
Emmy Arthur recorded "Six Months In Jail Ain't Long" at a session in Chicago on January 17, 1935, accompanying himself out of G position in standard tuning.  It's a very straight rendition, in both the singing and the accompaniment, of a kind that's pretty much altogether absent from present-day Country Music.  His performance of the song is not up on Youtube, but it is included in the JSP set, "Clarence Ashley--Country Music Pioneer", which has over a full disc out of the four-disc set devoted to Emry Arthur songs.  The song is a waltz.

INTRO

I went out the other night to have a good time
I got myself in trouble, and now I'm serving time
They took me down to the old courthouse and put me on the stand
"Just six months in the county jail, I'll give to this young man."

REFRAIN: Six months, six months, six months ain't long
Six months ain't long, little girl
Six months ain't long for me to be gone
Six months in jail ain't long

They took me down to the county jail, the jailer turned the key
He said, "My boy, in six long months from this place you will be free."
He turned around and walked away, he had no more to say
Just tell my girl that I'll see her in six months from today

REFRAIN: Six months, six months, six months ain't long
Six months ain't long, little girl
Six months ain't long for me to be gone
Six months in jail ain't long

Now I don't like to be in jail, for it is a dirty place
The judge, I know I can't forget, when he looked me in the face
He said, "Stand up for sentence, boy."  That's when my face grew pale
He said, "I'll give you six long months down in our county jail."

REFRAIN: Six months, six months, six months ain't long
Six months ain't long, little girl
Six months ain't long for me to be gone
Six months in jail ain't long

All best,
Johnm

38
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Last post by Johnm on February 04, 2020, 11:26:38 AM »
Hi all,
We've had no responses for several days on the puzzler on Carolina Slim's "Worrying Blues", so I'll post the answers.  Here goes:

For Carolina Slim's "Worrying Blues":
   * His playing position was A position in Dropped-D tuning, as Chris first noted.  You can really hear that low root on the IV chord when he first goes to his D chord.
   * He fretted the long ascending/descending run from :11--:16 as follows:  On the + of beat four, he hits a bent fifth fret of the third string.  On beat one he plays a triplet moving up the second string from the third fret to the fourth fret to the fifth fret.  On beat two, he plays a triplet going from the third fret of the first string to the fifth fret of the second string to the third fret of the second string.  On beat three, he plays another triplet, going from the first fret of the second string to the second fret of the third string to the open third string.  On beat four, he plays a triplet descending the fourth string chromatically, second fret, first fret, open.  On beat five, he hits the bent third fret of the fifth string twice, on 6 +.  And on beat six, he concludes the run with a triplet, hitting the bent third fret of the fifth string and then hitting the second fret of the third string twice, finally resolving into the open fifth string on the downbeat of the next measure.  The length of this run and it's circuitous quality are very Lightninesque.
   * From :19--:21, Carolina Slim brushes the first three strings, while fretting the sixth fret of the third string and the fifth fret of the second string, as both Old Man Ned and Prof Scratchy had it.  Getting that unison between the fifth fret of the second string and the open first string gives the brush stroke a neat buzzy quality.
   * From 1:49--1:52, Carolina Slim starts a slide from the second fret of the fourth string on the + of beat two of a 2-beat measure, arriving at the seventh fret of the fourth string on beat one and filling out the beat by hitting that note two more times for a triplet.  On beat 2 + he goes from the seventh fret of the fourth string to the open fourth string.  On beat three, he plays a triplet going from the bet third fret of the fifth string to the open fourth string and back to the bent third fret of the fifth string.  On beat four, he plays another triplet, going from the bent third fret of the fifth string and hitting the second fret of the third string twice, finally resolving to the open fifth string on the downbeat of the next measure.  Once again, the placement of the run and its sense of taking however much time is necessary to complete the musical thought is very much in Lightnin' Hopkins' style.

I think that Phil's observation that Carolina Slim sounds like a combination of Blind Boy Fuller and Lightnin' Slim is spot on.  Behind his singing, Carolina Slim shows a stronger Fuller influence in his phrasing and timing, utilizing several of Fuller's pet moves in A, but in his soloing, he shows a much stronger Lightnin' Hopkins influence.  And of course, Lightnin' recorded several songs played in A out of Dropped-D tuning, which is something Fuller never did.  It's really a shame that Carolina Slim passed away so young, both for his own sake and for his friends and family, of course, but in a musical sense, because he wasn't presented with the opportunity to come into his own, in a way.  Despite that, he recorded a lot of really strong music, and as I listen to him more, I'm more and more impressed all the time.  He really had a lot to offer.

Thanks to all who participated, and I hope you enjoyed Carolina Slim's "Worrying Blues".  I'll try to find another puzzler to post soon.  Incidentally, I hope those of you who are guitarists will try some of these runs--they're great!
All best,
Johnm   
39
Down the Dirt Road / Re: Other Musical Interests on YouTube
« Last post by lindy on February 03, 2020, 06:45:54 PM »
Hot hot hot . . .



Tyler Jackson, the banjo picker, will be teaching at the Red Hot Strings workshop at Centrum in May.
40
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Cypress Grove run
« Last post by Johnm on February 02, 2020, 04:06:21 PM »
I'm glad that helped, monts.
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