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RL, did you shoot him in self defense? No, I shot him in the leg and he jumped the fence - R.L. Burnside

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31
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Playing standing
« Last post by Rivers on October 20, 2020, 08:50:58 AM »
Yeah I just can't bring myself to screw a strap button into the heel of some of my guitars though!  :(
32
Jam Session / Re: Hearing devices
« Last post by Prof Scratchy on October 20, 2020, 08:16:56 AM »
Do you mean hearing aids? If so, my experience was that I didn’t get on at all well initially. Everything sounded too trebly. That was because I’d accommodated over the years to hearing without the frequencies I’d lost. You just have to be patient and wait for your brain to accommodate to the ‘corrected’ sounds until they become the new normal. This takes about eight weeks. Stick with it.
33
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Bo Carter Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on October 20, 2020, 08:04:58 AM »
That's a good question, Eric. I almost feel as though I'd have to listen to his recordings in the order they were recorded to pinpoint all but the most obvious differences. For many of his earlier session he was joined by at least one other musician for a couple of tunes. And on several of his early recordings, he used a flat pick in his picking hand to accompany himself. For his New Orleans session on January 19, 1935, out of 12 tunes recorded and released, he was backed by his brother Harry on two tracks. All of his tracks at his last four sessions, in '36, '36, '38 and '40 were solo tracks.

Part of the problem in assessing his playing's evolution is if something he's not done before shows up for the first time in a later session, I don't think it can be assumed that he had just learned the new lick or phrase since his last previous session--he just may not have chosen to record it earlier. And as far as charting development or growth in the different playing positions/tunings he utilized, it's also difficult to chart growth. Two of his most stellar and innovative recordings in DGDGBE and dropped-D, "Pretty Baby" and "Boot It", respectively, were recorded early in his career, in 1931, at two different sessions. Without knowing the recording dates, I had always assumed they cam from later in Bo's career.

Having access now to the dates at which he recorded his songs, I've come to feel that Bo was really already highly evolved as a musician, much like Lemon Jefferson, when he was first recorded, and only the fact that he was popular and ended up recording so much made it possible for him to show the great breadth of what he was able to do on the guitar.

All best,
Johnm 
 
34
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Bo Carter Lyrics
« Last post by eric on October 20, 2020, 07:47:18 AM »
John, you've listened to a lot of Bo Carter.  Do you notice any changes in his playing over the course of his 1928-1940 recordings?
35
Jam Session / Hearing devices
« Last post by eric on October 20, 2020, 07:45:38 AM »
Anyone have experience playing while using these?  I'm new to them and having some trouble trying to get a good sound mix.  Like  a lot of folks, I've got age and work-related high frequency hearing loss.
36
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Bo Carter Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on October 20, 2020, 06:51:56 AM »
Hi all,
For "Border of New Mexico Blues", recorded at his last session, Bo once again chose to accompany himself out of DGDGBE tuning. The song appears to be a cover of "Sweet Home Chicago" or "Kokomo Blues", asking the question, "Baby, don't you want to go?". It's unusual for a Bo song in that it lacks a solo. It's actually quite a ways from San Antonio to the border of New Mexico, but there you go. Here is "Border of New Mexico Blues":



INTRO

I'm cryin' hmmmmmmm, a-baby, don't you want to go?
I'm cryin' hmmmmmmm, a-baby, don't you want to go?
I mean back to old San Antonio, Texas, down on the border of New Mexico

Says, one and one is two, two and two is four, I got a '40 V-8, baby, you know it's rarin' to go
REFRAIN: I'm cryin' hmmmmmmm, baby, don't you want to go?
I mean back to old San Antonio, Texas, down on the border of New Mexico

Says, four and one is five, five and one is six, you miss me this time, baby, you'll get balled up in a trick
REFRAIN: I'm cryin' hmmmmmmm, baby, don't you want to go?
I mean back to old San Antonio, Texas, down on the border of New Mexico

I'm cryin' hmmmmmmm, a-baby, don't you want to go?
I'm cryin' hmmmmmmm, baby, don't you want to go?
I mean back to old San Antonio, Texas, down on the border of New Mexico

Hey, six and two are eight, eight and two are ten, you miss me this time, baby, you won't have this chance again
REFRAIN: I'm cryin' hmmmmmmm, baby, don't you want to go?
I mean back to old San Antonio, Texas, down on the border of New Mexico

Says, mama gone away, daddy sure don't care, lets truck 'em down a little bit, baby, this stuff has done got chere [sic]
REFRAIN: I'm cryin' hmmmmmmm, baby, don't you want to go?
I mean back to old San Antonio, Texas, down on the border of New Mexico

Edited 10/20/20 to pick up correction from Harry

All best,
Johnm

37
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Last post by Johnm on October 20, 2020, 06:32:40 AM »
Hi all,
Any takers for the Arzo Youngblood and Jimmy Davis puzzlers? Come one, come all! Answer just one question or answer them all.
All best,
Johnm
38
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Playing standing
« Last post by waxwing on October 19, 2020, 10:12:39 PM »
Funny this should come up. A couple weeks ago I stumbled onto the old footstool I used to always carry around.

That was before Steve James impressed upon me the importance of standing if you are going to perform, particularly if you are also singing. Probably around 2005 at Port Townsend. I agree with him and feel that standing I can really get the performance of the music out to the people. I think this applies whether I am standing on the cement at a farmer's market or on a stage in a large auditorium.

Like Pan I tend to wear a strap when I do sit down. I actually tend to practice standing about 80% of the time. Transcribing I do sitting, mostly. I think if I were going to record again I would practice sitting because I feel I can be more accurate, not to mention maintaining correct positioning to mics. I guess performing I worry less about accuracy and more about playing music, and getting that across. I agree with Rivers that getting the guitar in the right position is important but I have a range so I can change the strap length a little if I want a little change.

FYI: Almost everyone who I know that performs standing attaches the strap to the neck heel. It balances better and the guitar will stay where it is in those spots where your hands kinda come off the guitar momentarilly.

Wax
39
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Playing standing
« Last post by Rivers on October 19, 2020, 08:21:29 PM »
I do both. It's easier with an open back banjo since it's thinner. I spend half my practise time in my shop, playing & singing, sitting down, and the rest wandering around doing the same. Tip: You really do need a good strap adjusted just right for both sitting and standing.

Sitting down is where I work on stuff in detail. Wandering around is where I find out if I've really got it down.
40
Country Blues Licks and Lessons / Re: Playing standing
« Last post by Pan on October 19, 2020, 07:16:01 PM »
FWIW, I nowadays always wear a guitar strap, even when practising at home, so I can play either sitting or standing up. Therefore I no longer have to worry about getting a correct sized chair, or a footstool etc. on a gig. Makes life so much easier, at least for my aging and aching back. 

Cheers,

Pan
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