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Woman I do, woman, God knows I do. I do more for you than any poor man would do - Robert Wilkins, I Do Blues

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1
Gitfiddles, Harps, Washboards & Kazoos / Re: Capo suggestions
« Last post by waxwing on Today at 09:59:00 PM »
Shubb does make a flat fretboard capo as well, sold for "Classical" and it has plenty of length for an old Stella. Even a twelve string, I can attest. I have a Shubb for every guitar so that I can keep them preset for performance. The tension adjustment, needed as you move up the neck, comes easily to hand.

Wax
2
Thanks very kindly for that citation, dj, it more than satisfies my curiosity and the need to feel like I'm more certain about the reason for the multiple versions of Lemon's hits, before stating a reason for them in the book I'm writing. Thanks so much!
All best,
Johnm
3
I think I've got it.  Alex van der Tuuk's Paramount's Rise and Fall (2003 edition), on page 34 and following, states that Paramount's master pressing disks were cast from copper-coated wax "mothers".  The early masters would apparently wear out rather quickly, and repeated recasting would wear out the mothers.  Then, p. 113 states:

"His first major seller came with the release of "Got The Blues," baked with "Long Lonesome Blues," on Pm 12354.  This appeared in the Chicago Defender of May 1 and was so successful that the NYRL must have run out of mothers within a few weeks, as Jefferson was back in Chicago in May or June to re-record the titles."

So a bit of supposition there, but I think that's as close to nailed down as we're going to get.

(By the way, NYRL stands for New York Recording Laboratories, a subsidiary of the Wisconsin Chair Company and the parent company of Paramount Records.)
4
Gitfiddles, Harps, Washboards & Kazoos / Re: Capo suggestions
« Last post by harriet on Today at 04:13:36 PM »
I use a bunch of different brands, paige, schubb and kyser. Paige makes one that is deep enough to work on my squareneck modified for regular playing. I veer towards the paige on my ladderbraced parlors, they seem to suit the flat fretboards, Schubb makes a variety of curves and also sells spare rubber parts in case they wear out- I rotate mine.
5
Country Blues Lyrics / Re: Bo Carter Lyrics
« Last post by Johnm on Today at 03:57:46 PM »
Hi all,
Bo Carter recorded "I Love That Thing" at a session in New York City on June 4, 1931. He accompanied himself out of Vestapol tuning for the song, which is essentially a cover of "Tight Like That". Bo is joined on the track by the same lewd mystery commentator who did the talking on "Twist It, Baby". Here is "I Love That Thing":



INTRO

Now listen here, folks, gon' tell you the fact, my baby got somethin' that I sure do like
REFRAIN: Oh I love that thing, I love that thing
I love that thing, tell the world I do

Now it ain't no sugar, it ain't no cake, my baby got me some mighty good meat
REFRAIN: Oh I love that thing, I love that thing
I love that thing, tell the world I do

SOLO X 2 (Spoken: Oh baby, I love that thing. Ha ha ha. Oh, you know I love that thing. Baby, it's so good. Mama's so good, I love that thing. Ha ha.)

My baby got somethin', don't know what it is, when she let me down I can't be still
REFRAIN: Oh I love that thing, I love that thing
I love that thing, tell the world I do

My baby got somethin' like a stingeree, she can stand in Memphis put the jinx on me
REFRAIN: 'Cause I love that thing, I love that thing
I love that thing, tell the world I do

I went home last night, 'bout a-half past ten, I knocked on the door and she let me in
REFRAIN: Oh I love that thing, I love that thing
I love that thing, tell the world I do

SOLO X 2 (Spoken during solo: Oh baby, I love that thing. Heh, heh. Mama, I sure love that thing. Told you once before, Mama, I love that thing. Oh baby, sure is good. Mam', I love that thing!)

Now I told you once, I told you twice, when I get to lovin' want to love you right
REFRAIN: Oh I love that thing, I love that thing
I love that thing, tell the world I do

Now, listen here, baby, bear this in mind, I never gets tired of lovin' you all the time
REFRAIN: 'Cause I love that thing, I love that thing
I love that thing, tell the world I do

All best,
Johnm

 
   
6
Sorry to be late to this.  I've heard the same thing, that the masters wore out.  I'm sure I have the details of how and why somewhere.  I thought it would be in Goodrich and Dixon's Studio Vista book Recording The Blues, but it's not.  I'll look further and see what I can come up with.
7
Many thanks to all who have responded to my question so far: Prof, Lew, Stuart, Eric and Wax. I will follow up some of the leads and post any kind of definitive answer I'm able to find to my original question.
All best,
Johnm
8
Here are a few old documentaries which can help those who don't have a real understanding of the recordmaking process in the early 20th Cent.







Interestingly two are silent films.

Wax
9
The old listserv 78-L is still active I think.  When was collecting, this was the place for early recording days esoterica.
10
Hi John:

I've read the same thing over the decades, and as has been mentioned, it wasn't limited to Lemon. But other questions arise, such as was this specific to the materials and processes that Paramount and perhaps some other labels used or was it industry wide? I can't recall reading anything definitive or something that mentioned an authoritative source for the info.

I'm sure the information is available somewhere, but a quick search last night didn't turn up any histories that included the manufacturing side of the music business.

Years ago Elijah posted a question to the PWBG re: an article in a trade journal from back in the 20s or 30s, IIRC. By chance I was going to the UW and stopped by the Music Library and asked the librarian about it. She said that the trade publications contained a treasure trove of info, but unfortunately they were not publications that libraries subscribed to and even the subscribers didn't hang on to them. And the ones that were discovered and donated were far down on the list of materials waiting to be scanned and archived. But I digress...

In addition to the collectors mentioned, you might check out the websites devoted to 78s. People there might be able to point you to sources that will help you with your question.

As an FYI:

https://great78.archive.org/

https://archive.org/details/78rpm



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