WeenieCampbell.com

Country Blues => Down the Dirt Road => Topic started by: Stuart on March 29, 2010, 03:30:05 PM

Title: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: Stuart on March 29, 2010, 03:30:05 PM
Elijah just posted this to the PWBG:

http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/viewItem.do?ark=21198/zz00089bvf
Title: Re: UCLA Digital Collections Link
Post by: uncle bud on March 30, 2010, 07:33:06 AM
Have you been able to get this to work, Stuart? I keep getting service unavailable messages, and even when going to the main UCLA collections page, get the messages when trying to find anything.

Online access to recordings apparently include "David Evans's interviews with Rube Lacey and John Fahey's extensive interviews with Ishmon Bracey...and a short but interesting Mance Lipscomb interview"
Title: Re: UCLA Digital Collections Link
Post by: Parlor Picker on March 30, 2010, 08:17:44 AM
I get "Service Temporarily Unavailable".
Title: Re: UCLA Digital Collections Link
Post by: Stuart on March 30, 2010, 08:36:58 AM
I just tried and received the "Service Temporarily Unavailable
The server is temporarily unable to service your request due to maintenance downtime or capacity problems. Please try again later
" message. So the problem isn't with your connection.

I tried it yesterday right after Elijah posted the link to the PWBG and connected with no problem. I listened to a couple of the recordings on the first page, so it should work when the site is back up. From what I saw yesterday, there are over 2,100 items, which is going to require some time to wade through.

Its 8:30 a.m. out here on the West Coast, so maybe the staff is trying to do some site maintenance before all of us Left Coast old music nuts crawl out from under our respective rocks and overload the system!
Title: Re: UCLA Digital Collections Link
Post by: Stuart on March 30, 2010, 12:08:01 PM
Just checked--It's back up.
Title: Re: UCLA Digital Collections Link
Post by: Neal Cassady on March 30, 2010, 10:57:07 PM
this is an amazing find - thank you!
Title: Re: UCLA Digital Collections Link
Post by: Stuart on March 31, 2010, 08:45:07 PM
I neglected to mention that when you select one of the items in the UCLA Collection, you can click on where it reads "Play Content" in the "AUDIO CONTENT" box on the left hand side. On my computer, the track plays through Real Player. When I click on the right pointing triangle (I guess this is call the "PLAY" button), it appears to use the site's player. I just listened to this Babe Stovall clip. It's great:

http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/viewItem.do?ark=21198/zz00095vh4
Title: New collection at Center for Popular Music at MTSU
Post by: poymando on February 06, 2011, 08:03:02 AM
Hey Folks,
I thought I'd post a quick announcement here that might be of interest:

The Doug Seroff Collection of Tennessee Black Gospel Quartet Materials comes to the Center for Popular Music
 
Doug Seroff, a scholar of African American music, has placed in the Center?s holdings extraordinary research materials that he collected over more than thirty years of work.  These include more than 300 photographs, a rich cache of interviews, newspaper clippings, the personal effects of John Battle (an original member of the Fairfield Four), recordings (both audio and video), programs, letters, and much more.  The materials are currently being accessioned, cataloged, conserved, and organized.  A detailed finding aid should be available by May 2011.
 
Search other holdings of the Center for Popular Music at:  http://popmusic.mtsu.edu

CPM also holds Gayle Dean Wardlow's interviews with blues musicians:
http://popmusic.mtsu.edu/archives/inventory/wardlow.htm (http://popmusic.mtsu.edu/archives/inventory/wardlow.htm)
Title: Re: New collection at Center for Popular Music at MTSU
Post by: lindy on February 06, 2011, 10:22:45 AM

Thanks, Poly, that's a great find. However, I spent just a few minutes trying to find the actual collection on the MTSU site with no luck, did a keyword search and collector's name search, two strikes. Admittedly I didn't make a real strong effort, but if you happen to come across the url to the actually Seroff connection, please pass along. I'll try again later.

L
Title: Re: New collection at Center for Popular Music at MTSU
Post by: poymando on February 06, 2011, 10:53:50 AM
Hi Lindy,
The collection is currently being processed so it is not officially up on the CPM site. Hopefully there will be a detailed finding aid by this May. I'll try to post when it is up.
Title: Re: New collection at Center for Popular Music at MTSU
Post by: poymando on March 30, 2011, 09:42:25 AM
Hi folks!
I posted a month or so ago to give the forum members a little news brief about Doug Seroff's collection of materials relating to African American gospel quartets that was recently donated to the Center for Popular Music in Murfreesboro, TN.
The finding aid is now up online and available for researchers to view the contents of the collection. Here are the links:

http://popmusic.mtsu.edu/archives/inventory/SeroffGospel.htm

Here is the link for the CPM:
http://popmusic.mtsu.edu/

While the primary focus of the collection is the gospel quartet tradition, there are a few bits and pieces of information in there that might be of interest to scholars of Black banjo/string band music.
Title: Re: New collection at Center for Popular Music at MTSU
Post by: uncle bud on March 30, 2011, 10:44:07 AM
Thanks for the update, poymando.
Title: Various music collections offered through University Archive
Post by: kenneth on August 24, 2013, 01:52:09 PM
The enclosed albums available to download free via itunes are really worth exploring there are some wonderful old performances on them https://itunes.apple.com/gb/itunes-u/festivals-historic-recordings/id384928753?mt=10
Title: Re: Various music collections offered through University Archeive
Post by: Cleoma on August 24, 2013, 02:07:37 PM
You can also find all this stuff and much much more through the following websites - meaning you don't have to do it via the iTunes store!

http://www.etsu.edu/cass/archives/ (http://www.etsu.edu/cass/archives/)

and there is also the massive Digital Archive of Appalachia:
http://dla.acaweb.org (http://dla.acaweb.org)

Happy hunting!!
Title: Re: Various music collections offered through University Archeive
Post by: kenneth on August 26, 2013, 04:19:20 AM
Whilst trading sites, you might like to explore Fred Robbins wonderful site. There is some really interesting stuff here recorded by Fred on reel to reel plus links to his friends

http://frobbi.org/picking.html (http://frobbi.org/picking.html)
Title: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: ScottN on September 04, 2013, 02:50:26 PM
Berea College Digital has posted about 200 new videos on their website from their Celebrations of Traditional Music and other work over the past month or so.

This includes actual video footage of Buddy Moss and many others...Asa Martin, Roscoe Holcomb...a ton of banjo...fiddle, autoharp, etc.

Enjoy, and if you get a chance send a thank you to Harry Rice and Sharyn Mitchell at Berea College for making this treasure available.

Thanks,
              Scott
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: CF on September 04, 2013, 03:44:37 PM
Hey . . . Have I ever seen Buddy Moss film footage before?!?! These are amazing.

http://cdm16020.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/search/collection/p15131coll4/searchterm/Video.Music/field/type/mode/all/conn/and/order/subjec/page/11 (http://cdm16020.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/search/collection/p15131coll4/searchterm/Video.Music/field/type/mode/all/conn/and/order/subjec/page/11)
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: Johnm on September 04, 2013, 04:24:00 PM
Thanks so much for the post, Scott.  It's incredibly exciting to have this performance footage of Buddy Moss made available.  And a little credit where credit is due--the fact that this footage is now available for the public to see can almost undoubtedly be attributed to Scott's gentle persistence in getting Berea College to post the footage.  He'd read about the footage and followed up to see if it could be made available.  Well done, Scott!

It's neat to see that Buddy was very much a thumb-and-index guy in the right hand (quite often, just thumb!).  What a terrific singer, too!  His version of "Careless Love", which he calls "Love, Oh Love" is much my favorite that I've heard--really some hair-raising playing towards the front end of the rendition.  Incidentally, the song that Buddy calls "Madam" and says he can't find a source for is Cole Porter's "Miss Otis Regrets". 

You all may have noticed other footage that promises to be terrific among the listed videos, with lots of performances by Clyde Davenport, Franklin George, Roscoe Holcomb, Asa Martin, Janette Carter and a host of others.  Wow, thanks Berea College for making all of this footage available.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: Pan on September 04, 2013, 05:28:11 PM
Thank you so much, Scott! This is awesome!

I did send a thank you note to Mr. Rice and Ms. Mitchell too!

And thanks for Cheapfeet for the link (Moss is on p.11), this isn't the easiest site to navigate!

Wow again!

Cheers

Pan
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: Kokomo O on September 04, 2013, 06:24:21 PM
After viewing the seven Buddy Moss videos I went back to listen to some of his old solo recordings. I have to say, if his skills were diminished in 1977, and I'm not sure they were, they weren't diminished by very much. He was still quite impressive. This is great stuff.
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: CF on September 05, 2013, 06:22:48 AM
Scott . . . if you are to thank for these being shared then THANK YOU . . . Weenie Campbell thanks you & the rest of the Pre-War blues community of players & appreciators thanks you. I'd love to be wrong but as far as I can tell this is the only film footage of Moss that we have.
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: JohnLeePimp on September 05, 2013, 07:32:37 AM
Wow... someone really made my day
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: Prof Scratchy on September 05, 2013, 08:11:34 AM
Fantastic to be able to see Buddy Moss in the flesh, playing superbly!

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 4

Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: unezrider on September 05, 2013, 11:09:02 AM
i'll join the chorus & say my thanks, as well, scott! very nice surprise to start the day!
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: frailer24 on September 05, 2013, 11:56:17 AM
Scott, you have done the country blues community a great service. Thank you.
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: harvey on September 05, 2013, 01:37:33 PM
Just to add my thanks, really enjoying all th fottage in particular Buddy Moss, some incredible playing

Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: Old Man Ned on September 05, 2013, 01:42:29 PM
This is really special....amazing stuff...thanks so much for posting
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: Lyndvs on September 05, 2013, 02:39:06 PM
Thank you Scott.I`ve been enjoying the videos.The Buddy Moss and Roscoe Holcomb in particular.Still a lot more to check out.A real treat.
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: ScottN on September 05, 2013, 10:51:06 PM
Thanks to everyone for the kind words for the small part I played :-)

Cheapfeet - as far as I have been able to find it is the only video of Buddy Moss anywhere.  I am so thankful that it was digitized and made available to all before the original media material degraded further or became unusable.

Hopefully everyone is enjoying this early Christmas present...they continue to post more videos...saw some David Holt on banjo from the 1970s today...also, look around the site at the audio, etc...there are another dozen or so Buddy Moss audio recordings (in addition to many many others).

If you get a chance, please send a note to the folks at Berea who first had the foresight to record this treasure and are now spending their limited resources making this available to all.

Thanks,
              Scott
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: oddenda on February 02, 2014, 10:31:08 PM
Seeing Buddy took me back to my time in pursuit of getting him to record in the mid-70's. I was persistent, but to no avail - even after "The Great Pistol Incident of Fulton County". Buddy was always his own worst enemy, but a brilliant musician who tended to screw up his potential opportunities. Berea must have hit on him when he was having a good day!

pbl
Title: Re: Berea College Digital - video of Buddy Moss and others
Post by: ScottN on December 26, 2015, 11:35:28 PM
Hi all,

Just discovered some footage of Buddy Moss playing Tricks Ain't Working No More on YouTube.  It looks like home movie footage towards the end of his life. There is a lot of distortion but it is a thrill to see that right thumb in action, for me at least

https://youtu.be/sZPofOhDqBc

If the link doesn't work the title is "Tricks Ain't Working No More - Buddy Moss performs" - it was posted last month by Joshua Jacobson who is a very good player and singer based on watching his other videos.

Thanks,
            Scott

Title: Interview with Rosa Lee Carson (Moonshine Kate) from 1979
Post by: TenBrook on February 22, 2017, 10:57:44 AM
Just stumbled on this wonderful 3 part interview with Fiddlin' John Carson's daughter and country music pioneer Rosa Lee Carson. So far it's quite an enteraining/informative listen and it's wonderful to hear her voice 50+ years after she made her first recordings.

http://album.atlantahistorycenter.com/cdm/search/searchterm/Moonshine%20Kate,%201909-1994/mode/exact (http://album.atlantahistorycenter.com/cdm/search/searchterm/Moonshine%20Kate,%201909-1994/mode/exact)

It seems the Atlanta History Center site is worth poking around, another search brought up an interview with Gid Tanner's son Gordon.

Note that you can download the tracks by clicking the 'download' link in the top right.

Lew
Title: Re: Interview with Rosa Lee Carson (Moonshine Kate) from 1979
Post by: bnemerov on February 22, 2017, 07:48:23 PM
There's also an hour+ of audio with Blanche Puckett (Riley's wife) in the collection. These interviews were done by various social worker types. One outcome was this book:
https://www.amazon.com/Living-Atlanta-History-1914-1948-Thrasher/dp/0820316970

It's a wonderful read; it was very helpful when I was trying to put together Sister O.M. Terrell's childhood in Atlanta. One thing that makes these interviews so effective: blacks interviewed blacks and whites, whites. Minimized the "yassuh, nossuh" answers.

There are many more interviews than those used in the book--including some black guitarists and some of the hillbilly band musicians from the Atlanta scene of the 20s & 30s. Don't know how many are available on the 'net yet, but it's nice to see the AHC digitizing the tapes and putting some on-line.
I also recall Mike Gray describing using the AHC materials in his book about Willie McTell.
best,
bruce
Title: Re: Interview with Rosa Lee Carson (Moonshine Kate) from 1979
Post by: TenBrook on February 24, 2017, 08:51:39 AM
bruce,
Thanks for filling in the details on how the interviews came to be. Thanks also for pointing out the book.

Additional searching led me to this 4 part interview with Buddy Moss. Always wonderful to find additional first person accounts from early blues players.

http://album.atlantahistorycenter.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/LAohr/id/172/rec/1 (http://album.atlantahistorycenter.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/LAohr/id/172/rec/1)
Title: Re: Interview with Rosa Lee Carson (Moonshine Kate) from 1979
Post by: Johnm on February 24, 2017, 02:00:52 PM
Thanks very much for finding the links to these interviews and posting them, Lew.  The Buddy Moss one is revelatory.  Finding out that he described himself as 18 years old when he started to learn guitar in 1919 makes the instrumental expertise and vocal maturity he showed in his 1934 solo sessions much easier to understand.  His published birthdate of 1914 would make those '34 recordings implausibly precocious, especially vocally, where he definitely sounded like a grown man, not a 19-year-old kid.  The 1901 birthdate also makes his mature appearance in his post-rediscovery period a lot easier to understand.

I haven't listened to the whole interview, and in some ways it is a bit slow-moving, but it is fascinating, and knowing where it is makes it possible to return to it.  Thanks!
All best,
Johnm 
Title: Re: Interview with Rosa Lee Carson (Moonshine Kate) from 1979
Post by: Stuart on February 24, 2017, 05:38:06 PM
Thanks, Lew--These are great. And thanks for the background, Bruce.

At first the numbering of the Buddy Moss interview clips was somewhat confusing, but from what I can tell, they're all here:

http://album.atlantahistorycenter.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/LAohr/id/172/rec/1

http://album.atlantahistorycenter.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/LAohr/id/173/rec/2

http://album.atlantahistorycenter.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/LAohr/id/174/rec/3

http://album.atlantahistorycenter.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/LAohr/id/175/rec/4

The first two were done on February 23, 1979 and the next two on March 8.

The inferred "Clip 3 of 4" and "Clip 4 of 4" (neither of which I could find) appear to be "Clip 1 of 2" and "Clip 2 of 2."

Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Title: The Mike Seeger Collection at the University of North Carolina
Post by: banjochris on June 20, 2018, 12:24:46 AM
I've spent a good chunk of the evening listening to tapes from the Mike Seeger collection, online at the University of North Carolina ? https://finding-aids.lib.unc.edu/20009/ ? a bunch of the material you can only listen to on campus, but there is quite a bit available to listen to online anywhere, including a bunch of reels of Dock Boggs interviews and recording sessions (which are outtakes only, not the takes that made it onto the Folkways LPs).

I've only listened to the material from Boggs' first album and before, but so far I thought I'd share a couple of things, hopefully folks will find it interesting:

The original tune for "Lovin' Nancy," which Dock sings but doesn't play, is not quite the same but close to the tune of his "Cole Younger."

Dock also sings "Bound Steel Blues," written by him and recorded by the Shepherd Brothers, a cappella. It's rough but very cool.

Before he met Mike Seeger, Dock had never played "Death of Jerry Damron" on the banjo. He sings it with a different tune directly from the lyrics as they go through a bunch of old songs that Dock had written down. Dock says he's fooled with it a little but wants to get it to where he can play it on the banjo. It's clear from the conversation (which is from maybe the second or third time Seeger is visiting him, I would guess) that, given the chance to perhaps record again, that Dock is concerned that Seeger let the "recording manager" know that he has "oodles" of songs that no one else does, which of course is what the folks recording 78s in the 1920s were interested in the most.

One of the lines we had a little trouble with in "My Old Horse Died" should be "Swallowed the place where my house had stood"

I get the feeling Mike Seeger's biggest job recording Boggs at least early on was to get him to relax and slow down. Also there's one session with a different guitarist (I don't know who it is) that doesn't jell; Seeger's accompaniments are much better, which is not really a surprise.

There's a great outtake of "Harvey Logan" about 16:00 into reel 7 that only goes wrong near the end, where Dock sings the chorus:
"Oh my babe, my woman babe, hey hey hey hey." Also, Dock screws up two takes of "Harvey" a couple months apart in exactly the same place, the "lasso" verse.

On reel 8, a nice outtake of "Country Blues" with Mike Seeger backing on guitar.
Chris
Title: Re: Re: Dock Boggs Lyrics
Post by: Lastfirstface on June 20, 2018, 06:21:03 AM
Interesting stuff, Chris. I need to sit down and give those recordings a listen.

I don't know if you've checked them out, but I recommend the Eck Robertson tapes form the Mike Seeger collection. Lots of tunes that didn't make it to 78 or the County LP. He's a little shaky here and there but you get to here all kinds of special tunes like Eck's original "My Frog Ain't No Bullfrog."
Title: Re: Re: Dock Boggs Lyrics
Post by: Johnm on June 20, 2018, 06:44:33 AM
Thanks, Chris and Pete, for telling of your findings in the Mike Seeger collection.  I wonder how many resources of that sort are out there of which we're not aware.  Did you notice if there were any unissued recordings by Mike of the McGee Brothers and Arthur Smith, Chris?
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Re: Dock Boggs Lyrics
Post by: Lastfirstface on June 20, 2018, 07:22:14 AM
There are recordings of the McGee brother, several of which have already been digitized. Some of them are restricted and you can only access them from campus, but there are accessible separate interviews with Sam and Kirk that are worth a listen. I think the restricted recordings are ones that ended up on commercial releases like the "Opry Old Timers" LP and the "Milk 'Em In The Evening" live album.
Title: Re: Re: Dock Boggs Lyrics
Post by: TenBrook on June 20, 2018, 08:15:05 AM
In case anyone gets confused (like I did). Once you visit the link Chris posted (https://finding-aids.lib.unc.edu/20009/ (https://finding-aids.lib.unc.edu/20009/)), scroll all the way to the bottom to get to the digitized recordings. I at first tried clicking on links to individual performers at the top but found that some of them weren't digitized. The bottom links include anything that has been digitized. Once you click on it if the Access Restrictions state 'Open' then you're good to go. If it states 'Campus', well then, you'll have to wait until you're visiting UNC.

Thanks for sharing these Chris, I'm currently listening to Elizabeth Cotten (https://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/20009/id/2886/rec/1 (https://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/20009/id/2886/rec/1)) while a soft rain falls outside. In the past myself and others have shared links to other university repositories of online recordings. It would be nice to have a thread with all of them gathered in one place.

Lew
Title: Re: Re: Dock Boggs Lyrics
Post by: banjochris on June 20, 2018, 09:27:12 AM
There are recordings of the McGee brother, several of which have already been digitized. Some of them are restricted and you can only access them from campus, but there are accessible separate interviews with Sam and Kirk that are worth a listen. I think the restricted recordings are ones that ended up on commercial releases like the "Opry Old Timers" LP and the "Milk 'Em In The Evening" live album.

The "Milk 'Em" raw tapes are indeed available; I started listening to them very late last night -- they start with a few takes of a song that's not on the LP.
It seemed to me that much of what wasn't available involved a) bluegrass shows recorded live or radio shows that Seeger recorded and/or b) artists whose archives would still have significant commercial possibilities, like Mississippi John Hurt, Bill Monroe, etc.

It's gonna take a long time to listen to this stuff -- last night I heard the beginning of a tape that had 4 minutes or so of a slightly rusty but still amazing Leonard Copeland playing Beckley Rag and Just Pickin' from 1964.
Title: Re: Re: Dock Boggs Lyrics
Post by: Stuart on June 20, 2018, 09:32:52 AM
Nothing to do with Dock Boggs or Country Blues, but the article provides some insights re: the challenges institutions and people who preserve recordings face:

http://www.dailyuw.com/news/article_88d57cf0-6477-11e8-98a0-ebf19a287717.html
Title: Re: Re: Dock Boggs Lyrics
Post by: banjochris on June 20, 2018, 09:38:35 AM
Interesting stuff, Chris. I need to sit down and give those recordings a listen.

I don't know if you've checked them out, but I recommend the Eck Robertson tapes form the Mike Seeger collection. Lots of tunes that didn't make it to 78 or the County LP. He's a little shaky here and there but you get to here all kinds of special tunes like Eck's original "My Frog Ain't No Bullfrog."

I listened to just a touch of an interview with Eck that is on the B side of one of the Boggs reels, plus I have a bunch of Eck tunes that I acquired online somewhere years ago; I think it does have that Bullfrog tune -- I know it has Grigsby's Hornpipe on it, and it's not the County LP. Great stuff!
Chris
Title: Re: The Mike Seeger Collection at the University of North Carolina
Post by: Johnm on June 20, 2018, 05:23:04 PM
Hi all,
I think what Lew suggested, of having all of the various university/college-related links to music archives listed in a single thread is a great idea.  I will work on putting that together in the next couple of days, and when I get ready to do it, I will put all of the recent posts in this thread, starting with Chris's one from early today, in there.  When I do the big merge to create the thread, I will leave all of the posts with their original titles for ease of following earlier discussions.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: Johnm on June 21, 2018, 06:56:26 AM
Hi all,
I just merged a bunch of different threads to make this thread on music collections archived at colleges/universities.  I suspect there are other posts on site which should end up here, and I'll keep looking for them.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: TenBrook on June 22, 2018, 08:05:57 AM
Thanks John for putting this together.

Here's a link to the University of Arkansas Ozark Folksong Collection (I thought I, or someone else, had shared this at some point but I can't seem to find it). There's a lot of stuff to dig through here but it's well worth the time.

http://digitalcollections.uark.edu/cdm/search/collection/OzarkFolkSong (http://digitalcollections.uark.edu/cdm/search/collection/OzarkFolkSong)
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: Johnm on June 22, 2018, 08:23:13 AM
Thanks for suggesting the merger of topics, Lew.  I have added to this thread a thread dealing with links to interviews at the Atlanta History Center, not a college or university, per se, but close enough to the idea of this thread for it to make sense that it be here.  The relevant posts can be found on page three of this thread and they include links to interviews with Moonshine Kate (Fiddling' John Carson's daughter, Rosa Lee), Riley Puckett's wife and Buddy Moss.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: oddenda on July 11, 2018, 09:40:50 PM
"My" field recordings are currently held by The Southern Folklife Center in the Wilson Library at UNC-Chapel Hill. They can only be listened to at that location and not copied without my permission. The results of ten years of driving I-80 in the seventies. Not bad for a shy white guy from northern NJ back then. Check my web site [www.peterblowry.com] for more background information on my efforts.

Peter B.
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: waxwing on July 12, 2018, 08:19:48 AM
I think you mean I-81 or I-95, Peter. I-80 goes from New York City to San Francisco. I-81 goes from northern NY State to Knoxville Ky, behind the Appalachian Mountains for defensive purposes during an invasion (really). But I-95 travels from Maine to Miami, some along the coast, right through NYC, but then mostly right through your beloved Piedmont.

Wax
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: Lignite on July 12, 2018, 01:35:38 PM
That's right Wax. Before I-95, 301 was the old route. Can't quite remember when 1-95 replaced it. If it was during Pete's time scouting blues guys I-95 would have been fairly new at the time.
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: oddenda on July 13, 2018, 02:17:17 AM
This is what happens when one is too damn lazy to drag out the old faithful Rand-McNally from back i the day! It was I-85 I cruised en route to Atlanta, then I-75 to Macon. I also happened to take parallel blue highways sometimes going in the same direction... that's where I successfully hit pawn shops on the (then) cheap. Most of the folks running such establishments back then who knew me and appreciated what i was up to gave me good prices on my purchases: Guitars, amps, cases, etc. Their interest was the same as mine - the music. Almost all went to MMRF for a small profit on my part in 2016. Life was in some ways more relaxed back then once folks understood that I wasn't out to screw them and was doing something they found interesting and I had enough knowledge to keep my mouth shut and LISTEN to the people. That's what a folklorist does!! I still hit burn-out after a decade "out there" (1970-1980), though. 

pbl                                         
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: waxwing on July 13, 2018, 08:29:14 AM
Well you know we all appreciate your efforts here, Pete!

But for a roadie like me every highway tells a story. In the '70s I was situated up in Ithaca NY and used to drive south to Miami every year at New Years from about '74-79. I-81 then over to I-95. Sometimes coming back up by I-75, Atlanta, Chattanooga, Knoxville to I-81. Been in the San Francisco Bay Area since '89 and have crossed the country north (I-94), south (I-10, which mostly follows the old US Route 66) and middle (I-40 or I-80). Heading up to Portland on I-5 ("The 5") tomorrow. Any chance I might see you there Ligtnin'? 

Wax

PS: Almost all these trips were in VW bugs or my current '71 VW Squareback, which holds more guitars.
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: oddenda on July 14, 2018, 05:17:26 AM
Wax -

          That"s an important attribute for a vehicle! My vans (GMC at first, then Dodge) had "built-ins" for sleep and storage. I overfilled it once with Bastin going from Nashville in 1973 - the weight of the 78's purchased by Bruce caused a blow-out and a bent rear axle! After that, in was only two dogs, recording equipment, some guitars and amps, lus some Trix stock... much lighter load!

pbl
Title: Re: Music Collections Archived at Colleges/Universities
Post by: TenBrook on January 08, 2019, 07:52:07 AM
Hi all,
I recently became aware of the 'Archive Grid' a search engine specifically for "archival institutions" which seemed relevant to this topic.

Here's the link:
https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/
 (https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/)
And a description from the site:
"ArchiveGrid includes over 5 million records describing archival materials, bringing together information about historical documents, personal papers, family histories, and more. With over 1,000 different archival institutions represented, ArchiveGrid helps researchers looking for primary source materials held in archives, libraries, museums and historical societies."