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Country Blues => Super Electrical Recordings! => Discographies => Topic started by: Stefan Wirz on July 06, 2008, 11:37:52 AM

Title: Cat Iron (William Carradine)
Post by: Stefan Wirz on July 06, 2008, 11:37:52 AM
Just built a Cat Iron discography (http://www.wirz.de/music/catiron.htm), and - because there wasn't too much to build - added a few cover versions of his "Jimmy Bell" I know of.
Additional info - as always - very much appreciated !!!
Stefan
Title: Re: Cat Iron (William Carradine)
Post by: Johnm on July 07, 2008, 11:28:34 AM
Hi Stefan,
Thanks for creating the Cat Iron discography.  I believe the excellent British slide player Tom Doughty recorded "Tell Me, You Didn't Mean Me No Good" on his first (?) solo album, of which I unfortunately can not recall the title.
All best,
Johnm   
Title: Re: Cat Iron (William Carradine)
Post by: Parlor Picker on July 08, 2008, 01:53:43 AM
Hi Stefan,
Thanks for creating the Cat Iron discography.  I believe the excellent British slide player Tom Doughty recorded "Tell Me, You Didn't Mean Me No Good" on his first (?) solo album, of which I unfortunately can not recall the title.
All best,
Johnm   

Quite right John.  Track 2 on Tom's superb first album "The Bell" is indeed "Tell Me".  Tom's second album "Running Free" is also essential listening.  As I have written before, either here or in a magazine (can't remember which), Tom is a national treasure.

And speaking of national treasures, I think Stefan deserves a Grammy for his fantastic work as a discographer.  Don't suppose he'll get one, so I hereby nominate him for a "Golden Weenie".
Title: Re: Cat Iron (William Carradine)
Post by: dj on July 08, 2008, 03:43:01 AM
Quote
I think Stefan deserves a Grammy for his fantastic work as a discographer

A Grammy seems somehow so insignificant.  I've always thought he deserves som kind of United Nations "website of world-wide cultural significance" award.  Preferably one that comes with a large amount of cash! 
Title: Re: Cat Iron (William Carradine)
Post by: Bunker Hill on July 09, 2008, 12:01:38 PM
Here's a contemporary review from Britain of the Cat Iron LP by Derrick-Stewart Baxter in Jazz Journal, April 1959 (p.4):

Once again the indefatigable [Fred]Ramsey was responsible for recording this brilliant artist. The debt we all owe to him grows with every record he produces. Since Cat-lron "got converted" to religion, ie is reluctant to sing anything but religious songs: but after he had borrowed a friend's guitar and warmed up on some "church music" (there is a superb version of the well-worn "Saints") he cracked down on the blues, There are some superb originals on the LP (Folkways again) and a wonderful rendition of the lovely blues which Barbecue Bob recorded, "A Poor Boy A Long, Long Way From Home". I consider this to be one of the classic blues recordings of our time, and I urge Topic to consider its immediate issue. On the reverse Cat-Iron sings his gospel songs, and into these he puts just as much feeling. As Mr. Ramsey says in his album notes: "Cat-Iron might be singing religion, but he was playing it with the heart of a blues man".

I have tried to show that the country blues, and the way of singing them, are not yet dead. Each year it becomes harder to find the singers, that can be admitted, but the real truth is that very few ever try! It may well be that the traditional form of blues is dying, though I believe there will always be someone, somewhere, singing them the old. good, southern way! One thing is certain?the blues in some form or other will always be with us. However. at the moment, it is important that more of these singers be traced, and their stories published together with recordings made on the spot. We cannot expect Fred Ramsey and a dedicated few to shoulder all the burden. What is needed is some sort of fund to finance an expedition such as Ramsey made (and Alan and John Lomax before him) into the deep south. The work will be hard and the monetary reward small. but I am certain the adventure would pay dividends in pure folk singing

Surely, we here in England, through one of the jazz organisations such as the N.J.F[National Jazz Federation]. could raise enough (with concerts etc.) for this project to be made possible? All profits (if any) would, I hope, go to the artists. I realize that there is much work to be done. and only real enthusiasts would be willing to make the effort, but the job is important and should be undertaken. That then, is my suggestion. Is anyone interested?
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