WeenieCampbell.com

Country Blues => Weenie Campbell Main Forum => Topic started by: uncle bud on March 03, 2004, 10:02:06 AM

Title: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 03, 2004, 10:02:06 AM
Hi All,

Have been giving my mando a spin lately, relearning what little I knew, so am listening to Charlie McCoy and the like.

Anyone heard or have this one from Document?
Rags, Breakdowns, Stomps & Blues: Vintage Mandolin Music 1927-1946

TRACKLIST
Louie Bluie: State Street Rag / Dallas String Band: Hokum Blues / Phebal Wright: Lint Head Stomp / Carolina Peanut Boys: You May Leave, But This Will Bring You Back / The Blue Boys: Easy Winner / John Estes: Milk Cow Blues / Watcha Doin' / Dallas String Band: Dallas Rag / Gid Tanner & His Skillet Lickers: Flop Eared Mule / Arizona Dranes & Choir: I Shall Wear A Crown / Mississippi Mud Steppers: Jackson Stomp / Ishman Bracey: Brown Mama Blues / The Two Poor Boys: Two White Horses In A Line / Scottdale String Band: Japanese Breakdown / King David's Jug Band: Rising Sun Blues / Johnson Boys: Prater Blues / Carolina Peanut Boys: You Got Me Rollin' / Nashville Wash Board Band: MP3 Arkansas Traveller / Going Away To Make It Lonesome / Gid Tanner & His Skillet Lickers: Hawkins' Rag / Paul Warmack & His Gully Jumpers: The Little Red Caboose Behind The Train / Al Miller & His Market Street Boys: Somebody's Been Using That Thing / Arthur McClain & Joe Evans: Old Hen Cackle / Blue Ridge Ramblers: Jug Rag.

I don't have much from this selection and it looks mighty appealing.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 03, 2004, 06:52:14 PM
BTW, in hunting down mandolin stuff for inspiration I re-encountered King David's Jug Band in listening to Yazoo's Ruckus Juice and Chittlins Vol. 2.  This is Sam Jones (Stovepipe No. 1) on vocals and stovepipe and David Crockett on guitar with an unknown mandolin player. That unknown mando player smokes. The two tunes on the above Yazoo disc are great, Rising Sun Blues and Sweet Potato Blues.

Their total output, based on cursory googling, seems to consist of What's That Tastes Like Gravy? / Rising Sun Blues / Sweet Potato Blues / Tear It Down / I Can Deal Worry / Georgia Bo Bo. It's available on the Document CD STOVEPIPE NO. 1 & DAVID CROCKETT 1924 - 1930 which is temporarily out of stock according to the Document website. All these tracks are also on the Catfish 2-disc Cincinnati Blues compilation, which is recently out of print as far as I know (Catfish went under, didn't they?), but may still be easier to find leftover in stores and has a good amount of obscure stuff. I, luckily, found it on my shelf and will check out the rest of their output since I can't remember listening to this disc much (!)

Any other buried mando treasures out there?

uncle bud
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: M.Vidrine on March 04, 2004, 06:31:05 AM
Hey Uncle Bud -

You may want to check out Yank Rachel's complete works on Wolf. Yank was my favorite blues mandolinist. In fact, he's one of the only blues mandolin players that stands out in my mind. He did a lot of work with Sleepy John Estes & prior to that did some recording with Cannon's Jug Stompers (or Gus Cannon & Noah Lewis anyway).

Here are the links to the Wolf Recordings -
Complete Works V.1 1934-1938 - http://www.venerablemusic.com/catalog/TitleDetails.asp?TitleID=615
Complete Works V.2 1934-1941 - http://www.venerablemusic.com/catalog/TitleDetails.asp?TitleID=616

Malcolm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 04, 2004, 07:12:50 AM
Hi Malcolm,

I do have the Wolf vol 1 of Yank. Yank is indeed great. I've been listening to the Testament CD Mandolin Blues as well, featuring Yank, Johnny Young and others.

I'm looking also for non-Yank material though, more along the lines of Charlie McCoy, so probably leaning more towards rags and stomps, hokum etc.

UB
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on March 04, 2004, 08:26:41 AM
Uncle Bud,
You may want to check out the Allen Bros., whose complete recordings have been issued on, I think, 2 Document CDs.  They may have actually had banjo-mandolin rather than mandolin, but the basic sound and fingering are exactly the same, and they did the kind of material you're looking for.
All best,
John
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 05, 2004, 05:33:39 PM
Thanks John. I've got a couple Allen Bros cuts on the White Country Blues set from Columbia's Roots 'n' Blues. I suspect these are not the Bros at their best, judging from some samples out there in mp3 format. That excellent set has a few other mando tunes, a couple from the Prairie Ramblers including nice mando on Deep Elem Blues.

I'm working on a list of mandolin listening which I'll post when I've sorted out more.

Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on March 06, 2004, 09:17:17 AM
Hi Uncle Bud,
Another mandolinist who is often forgotten in Blues circles when blues mandolin is discussed is Bill Monroe, who I think was the best of the bunch.  As Louis Armstrong said of Bobby Hackett, "He has more ingredients.".
All best,
John
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 06, 2004, 03:29:16 PM
OK, here's the first take on the blues mandolin listening list, compiled from suggestions here and from Deacon, FrontPage and others on the old weenie list. Will edit it and update as required.

CHARLIE MCCOY
Charlie McCoy - Complete Recorded Works 1928 - 1932 Document BDCD-6018

Charlie & Joe McCoy
Charlie & Joe McCoy - Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order Vol. 1 (1934-1936) Document BDCD-6019
Charlie & Joe McCoy - Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order Vol. 2 (1936-1944) Document BDCD-6020

Mississippi String Bands & Associates 1928 - 1931 Document BDCD-6013 - Mississippi Mud Steppers (McCoy and Bo Carter), Mississippi Blacksnakes

w/ Bo Carter
Bo Carter - Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 1 (1928-1931) Document DOCD-5078
Bo Carter - Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 5 (1938-1940) Document DOCD-5082

w/ Walter Vinscon
Walter Vinscon - Complete Recorded Works (1928-1941) Document DOCD-6017 Chatman's Mississippi Hot Footers

w/ Ishman Bracey
Ishman Bracey/Charley Taylor - Complete Recorded Works (1928-1929) Document DOCD-5049

w/ Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe
Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe - Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 4 (1933-1934) Document DOCD-5031

w/ Memphis Minnie
Memphis Minnie - Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 4 (1938-1939) Document DOCD-6011
Memphis Minnie - Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 5 (1940-1941) Document DOCD-6012

w/ The Harlem Hamfats
Harlem Hamfats - Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order, Vol. 1 (1936) Document DOCD-5271
Harlem Hamfats - Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order Vol. 2 (1936-1937) Document DOCD-5272
Harlem Hamfats - Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order Vol. 3 (1937-1938) Document DOCD-5273
Harlem Hamfats - Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order Vol. 4 (1938-1939) Document DOCD-5274
Harlem Hamfats - Hamfat Swing 1936-1938 EPM Musique BC158932

w/ Big Bill Broonzy
Big Bill Broonzy - Complete Recorded Works, Vol.5 (1936-1937) Document DOCD-5127

w/ Mattie Hardy
Swingin' The Blues 1931 - 1939

w/ Monkey Joe (Jessie Coleman)
Monkey Joe Complete Recorded Works Vol. 1 1935-39 DOCD-5412

w/ Curtis Jones
Curtis Jones - Complete Recorded Works Vol 1 1937 - 1938 DOCD-5296
Curtis Jones - Complete Recorded Works Vol 2 1938 - 1939 DOCD-5297

YANK RACHELL
Complete Works V.1 1934-1938 Wolf Records
Complete Works V.2 1934-1941 Wolf Records
Sleepy John Estes Complete Recorded Works Vol 1 1929-1937 Document DOCD-5015
Chicago Style (on Delmark)
Tennesee Jug Busters (on Delmark)
Too Hot for the Devil (on Flat Rock)
"Yank Rachell" (the Blue Goose album - released on CD by Random Chance)
"Yank Rachell: Blues Mandolin Man" (Blind Pig - also released on CD by Random Chance)
w/ John Sebastian and the J-Band - Chasin' Gus' Ghost and I Want My Roots
Henry Townsend - Mule, Nighthawk Records

MEMPHIS JUG BAND
Vol Stevens on banjo-mand; Charlie Burse, mand.; Will Weldon, mand.
Memphis Jug Band Complete Recorded Works Vol 1 1927 - 1928 Document DOCD-5021
Memphis Jug Band Complete Recorded Works Vol 2 1928 - 1929 Document DOCD-5022
Memphis Jug Band Complete Recorded Works Vol 3 1930 Document DOCD-5023
Memphis Jug Band - The Story 1927-34 Blues Collection EPM
Best of the Memphis Jug Band  Yazoo 2059

KING DAVID'S JUG BAND
Sam Jones (Stovepipe No. 1) vocals and stovepipe, David Crockett guitar, with unknown mandolin player
Stovepipe No. 1 & David Crockett 1924 - 1930 Document DOCD-5269
Cincinnati Blues. Catfish Records
2 tracks also on Ruckus Juice and Chittlins Vol. 2. Yazoo

BIRMINGHAM JUG BAND
Band listed as possibly Jaybird Coleman (hca), Joe Williams, One-Armed Dave Miles, Dr. Scott, and Bogus Ben Covington gtr/mand., Honeycup (jug), New Orleans Slide (washboard). It doesn't sound like Coleman at all.
Jaybird Coleman and the Birmingham Jug Band DOCD 5140

DALLAS STRING BAND
Coley Jones, mandolin
Texas Black Country Dance Music Document 1927-35 DOCD-5162

THREE STRIPPED GEARS
RW Durden on mandolin
"Hokum Blues & Rags" Document DOCD-5392
Rounder's "Early Mandolin Classics"
Too Late Too Late Vol 6 1924 - 1946 Document DOCD-5461

MATTHEW PRATER
String Bands 1926-29 DOCD-5167 Matthew Prater & Nap Hayes
Violin Sing the Blues for Me. Old Hat Records. Violin Blues, Johnson Boys with Lonnie Johnson

AL MILLER
Al Miller, mandolin
Al Miller Complete Recorded Works 1927-1936 Document DOCD 5306

MEMPHIS MINNIE
Minnie plays mandolin on one song, After While Blues.
Memphis Minnie & Kansas Joe Vol. 3 1931-32 DOCD-5030

BOBBY LEECAN'S NEED MORE BAND
Alfred Martin - mandolin
Leecan & Cooksey Vol. 2 1927-28 (DOCD-5279)

HOWARD ARMSTRONG
Carl Martin / Willie '61' Blackwell 1930 - 1941 Document DOCD-5229
Louie Bluie - Arhoolie 470 Soundtrack from Terry Zwigoff 1985 documentary
Martin Bogan and Armstrong / That Old Gang of Mine (Martin, Bogan and the Armstrongs)  Flying Fish 70003, 1992; a re-release of two LPs combined on one CD
Louie Bluie (Howard Armstrong and friends)  Blue Suit Records, 1995

w/ Paul Geremia - Self Portrait in Blues. Red House. Howard plays mandolin on Charlie Patton's Shake It and Break It.

CARL MARTIN
Carl Martin - Crow Jane Blues. Testament. with Johnny Young.

LONNIE COLEMAN
banjo-mandolin
Sinners and Saints 1926 - 1931 Document DOCD-5106
(Two tracks from 1929 Old Rock Island Blues / Wild About My Loving)

ALLEN BROTHERS
Austin Allen on tenor banjo/banjo mandolin
The Chattanooga Boys Allen Brothers Vol 1 1927 - 1930 Document DOCD-8033
The Chattanooga Boys Allen Brothers Vol 2 1930 - 1932 Document DOCD-8034
The Chattanooga Boys Allen Brothers Vol 3 1932 - 1934 Document DOCD-8035

WALTER TAYLOR
unknown mandolin player
John Byrd and Walter Taylor Complete Recorded Works 1929- 1931 Story of Blues 3517-2

CLARA BURSTON
Barrelhouse Women 1925-30 Vol 1 - Document DOCD-5378

unknown mandolin on "Weak and Nervous Blues" and "Georgia Man Blues"

COMPILATIONS AND MISCELLANEOUS
Rags, Breakdowns, Stomps & Blues: Vintage Mandolin Music 1927-1946 Document DOCD-32-20-3

Mandolin Blues - Testament CD - Yank Rachell, Johnny Young, Willie Hatcher, Ted Bogan, Carl Martin.

Early Mandolin Classics, Vol. 1 Rounder  

Violin, Sing the Blues for Me. Old Hat Records - has numerous tunes with mandolin including Johnson Boys (Prater), Mississippi Mud Steppers (McCoy), Tommie Bradley (Eddie Dimmett, mand.), Bo Chatman/Carter/Mississippi Sheiks (McCoy), Mobile Strugglers (Lee Warren).

Earliest Black String Bands Vol 1 (DOCD-5622) - 14 songs by Ciro's Club Coon Orchestra feature mandolin banjo in a string band setting.

White Country Blues 1926-1938 A Lighter Shade of Blue - Columbia Legacy
Prairie Ramblers - Jug Rag / Deep Elem Blues with Chick Hurt on mand.
Callahan Brothers - Somebody's Been Using That Thing, Roy Hobbs on mand.
Allen Brothers - Drunk and Nutty Blues / Chattanooga Mama, with Austin Allen on tenor banjo/banjo mandolin

Contemporary Players
Steve James - Boom Chang, Art and Grit, Fast Texas, Tonight (w/ Del Rey)
Alvin Youngblood Hart - Down in the Alley
Tim Williams - Riverboat Rendezvous, Indigo Incident, Evenings Among Friends
Ry Cooder - Boomer's Story
Rich Del Grosso - Get Your Nose Outta My Bizness

Instructional Material
Learn to Play Blues Mandolin - Steve James [Homespun Tapes DVD]
Mandolin Blues: From Memphis to Maxwell Street - Rich Del Grosso, Book w/ CD, Hal Leonard ISBN 978-0-634-07249-9

Other Mandolin styles
Recommended by FrontPage:
BILL MONROE
The Music of Bill Monroe from 1936 to 1994 (Bill Monroe and various bands)  MCA 11048, 1994
The Essential Bill Monroe & the Monroe Brothers (Bill Monroe and various bands)  RCS 67450-2; 1997 (a BMG release).

David Grisman
Tone Poems  The Sounds of the Great Vintage Guitars and Mandolins (David Grisman and Tony Rice)  Acoustic Disc ACD-10, 1994.
Tone Poems II  The Sounds of the Great Jazz Guitars, Mandolins, Mandolas & Mandocellos (David Grisman and Martin Taylor)  Acoustic Disc ACD-18, 1995.
Tone Poems III  The Sounds of the Great Slide and Resophonic Instruments (Mike Auldridge, Bob Brozman and David Grisman)  Acoustic Disc ACD-42, 2000.
Bluegrass Mandolin Extravaganza (Sam Bush, David Grisman, Ronnie McCoury, Ricky Skaggs, and many others) 2 CD set, Acoustic Disc ACD-35, 1999.

Tim O'Brien
Hard Year Blues (Flying Fish FF 70319, 1984), includes Twelve Gates to the City.
Real Time (Howdy Skies HS-1003, 2000). Includes Keep Your Lamp Trimmed and Burning.
Red on Blonde (Sugar Hill SHCD-3853, 1996).

John Reischman
John Reischman & John Miller - The Singing Moon CORVUS-CD004
John Reischman and John Miller - Bumpy Road

Mike Compton and David Long
Stomp

Craig Ventresco
Craig Ventresco and Meredith Axelrod

Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Richard on March 06, 2004, 03:42:53 PM
If of any interest I know have an LP by Johnny Young entitled "Fat Mandolin" which I cannot find at present!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: waxwing on March 06, 2004, 03:51:30 PM
Great list UB. Just as an aside, I got Steve James' Blues Mandolin Video, from Homespun, and I think it's a worthwhile first step for a rank beginner such as myself (I didn't know how to use a pick). I can't put my hand on it at the moment to give you a song list, but I remember Yank's Divin' Duck Blues, Steve's version of Juanita Stomp and his own Saturday Night in Jail. He gives good ideas for stringing, tuning, picks, blues scales and licks and comping chords. Shows off some different style mandos and at one point he plays Yank's mando. He is backed by John Sebastion when he performs each piece. On one tune John plays a banjo-guit while Steve plays a banjo-lin. Cool.
All for now.
John C.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 06, 2004, 06:11:56 PM
Hi JohnC,

Yes, I should add Steve's video to the list. I have it as well and am working on it. The banjo-mando tune is Charlie McCoy's "That Lonesome Train Took My Baby Away," and is the one I'm working on currently. Great tune! Steve does it a little different, playing in D instead of C (pitched at B), and just teaches the opening chorus. I'm working on it in both keys and listening to the record. Also downloaded a tabbed/midi version of Vicksburg Stomp which I'll tackle next.

I'm no mando ace so the video is just my speed...though I think it should have had more material, clocking in at only 60 min.

cheers,
uncle bud
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on March 06, 2004, 08:35:59 PM
Nice list, UB - there's a couple of cool tunes by a guy named Lonnie Coleman, playing banjo-mandolin:

Old Rock Island Blues
Wild About My Loving

They both basically smoke, plus LC has a really interesting (to me) voice.  They're both on SINNERS & SAINTS 1926 - 1931 (DOCD-5106), although I have them on a Story of Blues CD:  Georgia String Bands.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 07, 2004, 06:15:50 AM
Thanks frankie, I'll add Coleman to the list, sounds intriguing, more CDs to sneak into the house.  :P

Another person I've forgotten is Howard Armstrong. I only have him playing mandolin on Paul Geremia's Self Portrait in Blues, so am not familiar with most of his non-fiddle work.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on March 07, 2004, 07:27:38 AM
Howard Armstrong

I forgot about him too - the soundtrack to Louie Bluie has some good stuff on it - a mix of his fiddling and mandolin.  There's another CD called Louie Bluie that's not the soundtrack....  don't have that one, though.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Slack on March 07, 2004, 08:56:13 AM
UB,

You might include Carl Martin's "Crow Jane Blues" on Testament - it has 6 cuts with Carl playing mandoilin and 2 wtih Johnny Young.

Johnny Young's guitar back up is a little distracting (to me anyway) on some of the cuts - but Carl Martin is a fine mandolin player.  And as Frank pointed out, this CD is currently in Testaments bargain bin at $11.  Not sure what overlap their would be with Testaments "Mandoilin Blues" CD....?

cheers,
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bill Roggensack on March 07, 2004, 09:57:43 PM
Uncle Bud:

Since you asked about Bill Monroe, I'll give you some good listening suggestions in the bluegrass genre that have lots of bluesy licks. By the way, here are two more excellent CDs from Louie Bluie:

Martin Bogan and Armstrong / That Old Gang of Mine (Martin, Bogan and the Armstrongs)  Flying Fish 70003, 1992; a re-release of two LPs combined on one CD

Louie Bluie (Howard Armstrong and friends)  Blue Suit Records, 1995; my copy has a personal dedication in Howard's memorable copperplate handwriting

The Music of Bill Monroe from 1936 to 1994 (Bill Monroe and various bands)  MCA 11048, 1994; plenty of bluesy pieces to choose from over this giant's career. To quote Bob Dylan: "I'd still rather listen to Bill and Charlie Monroe than any current record. That's what America's about to me."

And for something more compact and affordable, try:

The Essential Bill Monroe & the Monroe Brothers (Bill Monroe and various bands)  RCS 67450-2; 1997 (a BMG release). It includes Muleskinner Blues, Tennessee Blues, Banks of the Ohio, And Weeping Willow Tree. I think some of the most strongly blues-influenced pieces are among his recordings of sacred music. To my ear, there just seems to be more emotion in the stuff that isn't racing along like a run-away freight train. Perhaps I jsut can't hear fast enough?

Don't miss out on another player that has some great blues chops  here I'm referring to David Grisman. I'll suggest four rather expensive and relatively hard to find CDs that contain some truly great and timeless music:

Tone Poems The Sounds of the Great Vintage Guitars and Mandolins (David Grisman and Tony Rice)  Acoustic Disc ACD-10, 1994.

Tone Poems II  The Sounds of the Great Jazz Guitars, Mandolins, Mandolas & Mandocellos (David Grisman and Martin Taylor)  Acoustic Disc ACD-18, 1995.

Tone Poems III  The Sounds of the Great Slide and Resophonic Instruments (Mike Auldridge, Bob Brozman and David Grisman)  Acoustic Disc ACD-42, 2000.

Bluegrass Mandolin Extravaganza (Sam Bush, David Grisman, Ronnie McCoury, Ricky Skaggs, and many others) 2 CD set, Acoustic Disc ACD-35, 1999. Solos, duets, trios and octets: a killer CD with many bluegrass standards.

I would also be remiss if I didn't suggest that you have a listen to Tim O'Brien. He does a great take of Twelve Gates to the City on Hard Year Blues (Flying Fish FF 70319, 1984), and of Keep Your Lamp Trimmed and Burning on Real Time (Howdy Skies HS-1003, 2000). And there's lots of fun and familiar material on his nod to Bob (Dylan that is)  Red on Blonde (Sugar Hill SHCD-3853, 1996).

That should keep you listening for a couple hours!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Greg H on March 08, 2004, 08:16:08 AM
Hi everyone.  I've been lurking for awhile and decided to chime in.  Great site!

A couple of additions to the Yank Rachell portion of Uncle Bud's list:

"Yank Rachell" (the Blue Goose album - released on CD by Random Chance)

"Yank Rachell: Blues Mandolin Man" (Blind Pig - also released on CD by Random Chance)

Just a heads up (& with no connection to the site) - both of these albums seem to be going out of print as they are remaindered at www.daedalusbooks.com for
$5.95!  Get 'em while you can.

Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Slack on March 08, 2004, 08:27:52 AM
Hi Greg, welcome to the forum and thanks for the heads up!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 08, 2004, 01:09:02 PM
Thanks fellers, have updated the list accordingly. Woe to the beginning mandolin enthusiast looking for listening ideas now...

And welcome to the site Greg!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 18, 2004, 07:50:03 PM
Hi everyone.? I've been lurking for awhile and decided to chime in.? Great site!

A couple of additions to the Yank Rachell portion of Uncle Bud's list:

"Yank Rachell" (the Blue Goose album - released on CD by Random Chance)

"Yank Rachell: Blues Mandolin Man" (Blind Pig - also released on CD by Random Chance)

Just a heads up (& with no connection to the site) - both of these albums seem to be going out of print as they are remaindered at www.daedalusbooks.com for
$5.95!? Get 'em while you can.

Hi Greg - Received both of these (among others selections including Johnny Young and Friends) from Daedalus today. Can't beat the price... Thanks again for the tip.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on March 25, 2004, 07:42:59 PM
Received today the disc that started this thread, Rags, Breakdowns, Stomps & Blues: Vintage Mandolin Music 1927-1946 Document DOCD-32-20-3. I sure can recommend this compilation. Excellent selection, mix of string band, blues, old country with a blues edge. Seems to be an attempt to do for blues mandolin what Violin, Sing the Blues for Me did for fiddle (though there are some white players here). Quite a successful attempt as well. Gathers selections from many of the players in the master list earlier in the thread, plus more who aren't. Howard Armstrong's playing on State Street Rag is insane. See top of thread for the track list. Good notes by Richard Cherry as well. I'd say no mando maniac should be without it. (Some good band names too: Gid Tanner and His Skillet-lickers, Paul Warmack and His Gully Jumpers, Carolina Peanut Boys...)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on August 19, 2004, 08:27:05 AM
Just came across this article by Rich Del Grosso about Yank Rachell (http://www.mandozine.com/music/bluesmando/rachell.php). Good stuff on Yank's tuning and playing style, and two mando tabs from Rich.

Also a 2nd article on Johnny Young, with tab. Here. (http://www.mandozine.com/music/bluesmando/young.php)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: MotMot on August 19, 2004, 09:07:33 AM
Just came across this article by Rich Del Grosso about Yank Rachell (http://www.mandozine.com/music/bluesmando/rachell.php). Good stuff on Yank's tuning and playing style, and two mando tabs from Rich.

Also a 2nd article on Johnny Young, with tab. Here. (http://www.mandozine.com/music/bluesmando/young.php)

Great stuff!  Thanks for sharing. Blues mandolin blows me away, and this may prompt me to get some of those Yank Rachell and Johnny Young LPs off the shelves.

motmot
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Montgomery on August 19, 2004, 10:32:58 AM
Since this thread has come up, let me just throw in the opinion that I don't love the Document compilation.  Sound is terrible, and some tracks are at the wrong speed.  A lot of good stuff on there though, so I do recommend it, but with reservations.  There's a great mandolin compilation on Rounder called, I think, Early Mandolin Classics.  Unfortunately, the sound is pretty bad on that too (it's an old CD). 
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on August 19, 2004, 11:25:06 AM
Document compilation.  Sound is terrible

It's Document. I expect nothing less. :)

Are there releases of this material out there with cleaner sound? I have some of the material on other collections but haven't noticed any difference in quality, which is typical and not particularly rough compared to a lot of stuff from the era. Is it the limitations of the source material you mean?

It'd be nice to have Old Hat do a mandolin collection.

Quote
and some tracks are at the wrong speed.

Which tunes? I'll take another listen.

Quote
A lot of good stuff on there though, so I do recommend it, but with reservations.  There's a great mandolin compilation on Rounder called, I think, Early Mandolin Classics.  Unfortunately, the sound is pretty bad on that too (it's an old CD). 

I don't have this one as there's overlap with the Document CD and other material I have, plus fewer tracks at a very high price here in Canada when I've seen it. Track for track, I'd say the Document is a better collection.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on August 20, 2004, 10:55:31 AM
A couple more Del Grosso articles with mando music/tab at Mandolin Magazine's website, http://www.mandolinmagazine.com/workshops/delgrosso/
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on March 22, 2005, 10:50:54 AM
Hi all,
A couple of more mandolin players still working that have a strong blues influence on their playing:  Mike Compton and Frank Wakefield.  Mike, who is from Mississippi originally, first gained recognition as mandolin player for the Nashville Bluegrass Band, left them, played in John Hartford's last band before his death, and has since returned to the Nashville Bluegrass Band.  Mike's playing is very Monroe-influenced, very bluesy, and in recent years he seems to have broken through to a new level.  He is real good.
Frank Wakefield has been around a much longer time.  He came up in the '50s, had lots of Monroe influence as well, but has also been a huge innovator on the mandolin, introducing techniques like playing double stops between non-adjacent pairs of strings (while damping the pair of strings in between) so you get this almost piano-like texture as you move them around.  Frank has done a great deal of recording, but the best CD of his I have heard is the "Kitchen Tapes" he did with guitarist and singer Red Allen, a former bandmate.  These have been released on David Grisman's Acoustic Disc label, and the caliber of Franks playing on them is really stunning, about as good as it gets.  If you like Blues mandolin, it is definitely worth checking out.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on April 21, 2005, 05:19:46 PM
Hi all,
I was wondering if any of you mandolin-playing Weenies had ever figured any of Furry Lewis's first three recorded cuts, "Everybody's Blues", "Mr. Furry's Blues", and "Sweet Papa Moan", all of which had Charles Jackson (or Johnson, according to Document) playing mandolin.  They are all good numbers, and I have never heard anyone do them. 

"Sweet Papa Moan" is particularly cool; it is modeled melodically on "Black Snake Moan", and Charles Jackson does some great things on it.  The song is played out of a C position, and Jackson starts out holding a double stop over the I chord that you would nornally associate with the V chord--G on the E pair (third fret) and B on the A pair (second fret).  The sound of that double stop against the C chord Furry playing is pretty exotic.  It suggests a C major 7 chord, not a sound you normally associate with Country Blues, but not at all "loungy" or uptown-sounding, as it might be in other contexts.  Jackson continues to play the same double stop against the IV chord, and the effect is even more exotic--against the F chord, the G note is a 9 and the B note is a #11, or flat 5.  Once again, the sound is not sophisticated or Jazzy, but really just a neat kind of droning, like holding an open fiddle string against a melody as it passes through a chord change.  It sounds great.

Hearing a Lemon-ish model for a mandolin tune made me think how much more of his material might really suit the mandolin.  "Black Horse Blues", which has gotten a lot of attention on this site, could be a real mandolin tour de force, and I think "Easy Rider" would be great, too, with it's signature lick repeating over and over in between the vocal lines.  It's kind of a way to make something new from something old.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on April 22, 2005, 05:41:43 PM
Interesting idea, John - Black Horse Blues sounds pretty interesting on the mandolin.  I've fooled around with Everybody's Blues - Todd suggested playing that at Clifftop, so I'll dig that up again.  I hadn't heard Sweet Papa Moan before, so I req'd it on the Juke.  Is it me, or is that basically a 2-chord piece?  The effect is really cool, though - certainly worth exploring a little more.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on April 23, 2005, 06:30:01 AM
I hadn't heard Sweet Papa Moan before, so I req'd it on the Juke.  Is it me, or is that basically a 2-chord piece?

After listening again, it's certainly a I-IV-V, but the combined effect of the mandolin & Furry's vocal definitely plays tricks with my ears.  Neat stuff.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 23, 2005, 08:29:35 AM
I really like Everybody's Blues, which also seems to be modelled slightly on Black Snake Moan. You're right John, all these tunes would be great to play. I also like the idea of Lemon on mando. I may try some experiments to get me playing that a bit more. :)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on April 23, 2005, 08:38:15 AM
Hi guys,
Another Lemon tune that I think would be great on mandolin is "Prison Cell Blues"  I can just hear the mandolin tremoloing on that great series of notes Lemon sings  at the end of the line, "So tired of sleeping in this lowdown lonesome C-E-L-L".  And a guitar just doing boom-chang behind it might really work nicely.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: GhostRider on April 25, 2005, 08:31:44 AM
Hi all:

For all you mandoaholics. On Guy Davis' most recent CD (Legacy) he does a great mandolin-guitar duet cover of Tampa Red's "Things is 'Bout Comin' My Way" (according to Elijah Wald, the first recording of the "Sittin' On Top of the World" melody). Strangly enough, in the notes he mentioned he learned the song from a Jerry Silverman book, and doesn't know who did the original (Weenies to the rescue).

On the CD he does great covers of Hurt's "Payday", Estes' "Drop Down Mama", W. Davis' "Come Back Baby"and James' "Cypress Grove", as well as his own stuff (blues and old tyme music).

My Mama don't allow,
Alex
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 25, 2005, 08:46:17 AM
Guy Davis didn't know who did Things Is 'bout Comin' My Way????
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: GhostRider on April 26, 2005, 11:42:24 AM
Hey:

Yup, and I quote

"THINGS ABOUT COMING MY WAY - author unknown, from a book by Jerry Silverman
upright bass - Mark Murphy: mandolin - T-Bone Wolk; 6-string guitar & vocals - Guy Davis"

They do a good job of it.

Alex
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on April 29, 2005, 07:42:05 PM
Hi all,
I came across a couple of other good prospects for people looking for good mandolin/guitar Country Blues duets to figure out:  "Leavin' Town Blues" and "Brown Mama Blues" featuring Ishmon Bracey and Charlie McCoy on guitar and mandolin (possibly mandolin-banjo?) respectively.  They are both G tunes and are quite similar to each other, though not identical.  The guitar on "Leavin' Town" gets into some wilder stuff.  Ishmon's guitar parts sound a little bit like Mattie Delaney's on "Down The Dirt Road Blues", and even more like they are precursors of Tommy McClennan's sound in G standard.  Great singing, as you would expect from Bracey in this period.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Stuart on May 07, 2005, 10:25:57 AM
I'm a little behind re: going through the posts, so bear with me if this has already been covered. There's a book length work on Yank:
 
"Blues Mandolin Man: The Life and Music of Yank Rachell," by Richard Congress? (University Press of Mississippi, 2001)

I have a copy and have read it--it's quite good. In addition, some of Yank's last performances are on the CD: "Chasin' Gus' Ghost" by John Sebastian and the J Band
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on May 07, 2005, 11:56:23 AM
Welcome to Weenie Campbell, Stuart!  I don't believe the Yank Rachel biography has been mentioned on the site previously, so thanks for bringing it to everyone's attention.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on August 26, 2005, 03:06:31 PM
Hi all,
I was wondering if any of you mandolin players had worked out any of the songs recorded by The Two Poor Boys, Joe Evans & Arthur McClain.  For many years, the only tunes of theirs that I had heard were "Two White Horses In A Line" and "John Henry Blues", both of which appeared on an old Alabama Blues anthology on Origin Jazz Library.  When Phil put together the Weenie I and Weenie II CDs, taken from his collection, to be given to people who make donations to Weenie Campbell, he included two tunes by Evans & McClain (issued, apparently, as being by Colman & Harper).  The two tunes, "Old Hen Cackle" and "Sourwood Mountain" are standbys in the Old-Time tradition, and Evans & McClain's versions are just stellar, really outstanding playing by both mandolin and guitar.  The duo must have been fairly popular, because they recorded enough titles to fill up an entire Document re-issue, DOCD-5044.  It seems one of the great things about listening to this music if you are also a player is scouting out potential material for playing, and these guys seem like a good possibility.  When I mentioned them to Rich DelGrosso at Port Townsend this year, he was unfamiliar with them.  Who knows, maybe he'll have some stuff by them for his class next summer.  It would be great to hear some of their material performed.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on August 26, 2005, 09:56:31 PM
I've only heard Old Hen Cackle and Two White Horses.  I was turned on to these guys by Scott Prouty, a fiddler I know from Washington D.C.  He was pointing out to me the harmony singing on Two White Horses and the funky mandolin got my attention - the way that repeating riff is used over the chord changes is neat!  Thanks for the heads up on the Document CD - I had no idea that they recorded so much.  It would be very interesting to hear more of them.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on September 21, 2005, 05:27:09 PM
Hi all,
I was listening to "Everybody's Blues" today, Furry Lewis's first recorded title, and noticed for the first time that the mandolin part, credited to Charles Jackson (or Johnson), closely tracks the melody of the accompaniment that Furry played on "I Will Turn Your Money Green".  "Everybody's Blues" was played in C, Furry played "I Will Turn Your Money Green" in Spanish, and Joe Callicott played his "Lonesome Katy", which shares the same melody, in G, standard tuning.  Ishmon  Bracey's "Suitcase Full Of Blues", played in Spanish, shares some melodic similarities in its guitar part, too.  It will be interesting to see if the melody turns up elsewhere.  Of the four songs mentioned here, Joe Callicott's is the only one in which the voice sings the same melody the guitar is playing; in the others the voice sings a counter-melody to the accompaniment.  None of the sung melodies in the other songs match up with each other, either.  It's something to think about, I suppose.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: arbarnhart on September 21, 2005, 07:00:33 PM
I haven't seen Rich DelGrosso's new CD mentioned in this thread:

http://cdbaby.com/cd/richdelgrosso (http://cdbaby.com/cd/richdelgrosso)

You can hear samples there.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on September 21, 2005, 11:46:30 PM
The banjo-mando tune is Charlie McCoy's "That Lonesome Train Took My Baby Away,"
Which in itself is based upon the piano blues that Dora Carr and Cow Cow Davenport recorded in 1925 as Cow Cow Blues. Yes? No?
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on September 22, 2005, 07:26:32 AM
The banjo-mando tune is Charlie McCoy's "That Lonesome Train Took My Baby Away,"
Which in itself is based upon the piano blues that Dora Carr and Cow Cow Davenport recorded in 1925 as Cow Cow Blues. Yes? No?

I'm going to answer Yes. :) ?That's at least what the Document liner notes say on the Charlie McCoy disc, also mentioning that McCoy first recorded an instrumental version (a great one) of Cow Cow Blues as Jackson Blues (which should actually read Jackson Stomp). There's also a version of Cow Cow Blues I know of from 1930 by Jed Davenport and His Beale St. Jug Band. I don't actually have the original Cow Cow Blues in my collection, being woefully understocked in the piano blues dept.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on September 22, 2005, 11:54:32 AM
The banjo-mando tune is Charlie McCoy's "That Lonesome Train Took My Baby Away,"
Which in itself is based upon the piano blues that Dora Carr and Cow Cow Davenport recorded in 1925 as Cow Cow Blues. Yes? No?
I'm going to answer Yes. :) ?That's at least what the Document liner notes say on the Charlie McCoy disc, also mentioning that McCoy first recorded an instrumental version (a great one) of Cow Cow Blues as Jackson Blues (which should actually read Jackson Stomp). There's also a version of Cow Cow Blues I know of from 1930 by Jed Davenport and His Beale St. Jug Band. I don't actually have the original Cow Cow Blues in my collection, being woefully understocked in the piano blues dept.
You got there before me. I've just listened to the Carr/Davenport 1925 recording as on a 1979 Magpie LP of early Davenport and played the McCoy from a 1966 RBF compilation (Blues Roots Mississippi) the insert of which contains a lyric transcription but the writer doesn't comment on the origin of tune/lyric which, when heard/seen, is obviously. How wonderful hindsight is! ;)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on January 07, 2006, 04:49:08 PM
Hi all,
I have been listening to a tremendous mandolin player who I don't think has been mentioned previously on this thread:? Coley Jones of the Dallas String Band.? Two of the band's tunes, "Hokum Blues" and "Shine" are featured on the recent Old Hat release, "Good For What Ails You", and both performances are stellar.? The band's sound in general is ultra-spiffy, with bowed bass, Jones's very expert mandolin-playing, and the surprising guitar of Sam Harris, who at one point on "Hokum Blues" plays the very complicated and notey melody to "Hokum Blues" in tandem with Jones, but one octave lower.? Whew!
It appears that the band's entire recorded works are included on the Document album DOCD-5162 "Texas:? Black Coluntry Dance Music".? There are eight tunes by them in all, including "Dallas Rag".? Also included are tunes by William McCoy, Will Day, Frenchy's String Band, Jake Jones and the Gold Front Boys and Carl Davis & Dallas Jamboree Jug Band.? Sounds like a winner.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on January 07, 2006, 11:49:18 PM
Interestingly, the solo recordings he cut were with guitar, as too the duets with female singer Bobbie Caddillac.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on January 08, 2006, 10:15:07 AM
The Dallas String Band cuts with Coley Jones are on the Juke as part of the Texas Black Country Dance Music CD that John mentions. The solo guitar pieces Bunker mentions (rather different) are on the JSP set of Texas Early Blues Masters, also on the Juke.  The Dallas String Band stuff is really great. I thought we'd mentioned them, but if not, a glaring omission.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on January 09, 2006, 09:54:19 AM
Hi Uncle Bud,
I went back and checked and you were right, both the Dallas String Band and the Document CD with their complete recorded output were mentioned on the first page of this thread in a post that listed a variety of blues mandolin recordings, though their music was not discussed there at all.  Good memory!
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Slack on January 11, 2006, 12:44:30 PM
Quote
"Hokum Blues" and "Shine" are featured on the recent Old Hat release, "Good For What Ails You", and both performances are stellar.  The band's sound in general is ultra-spiffy, with bowed bass,

Yes!  These guys are great!  And that bowed bass gives them a "super" jug band sound.  The bass doesn;t sound as deep as a double bass -- wondering if it might be cello size or something.

Anyway, I have to admit I love the corny vaudeville humor too....

Hey Coley, can you sing!

No!

Why?

I lost my voice in jail........   

.........I'm always behind a few bars and I can't find the key.

ah well, times change  ;)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Rivers on January 15, 2006, 10:20:34 AM
Coincidence, I've been working on a guitar arrangement of Shine, probably Louis Armstrong|Golden Gates as channeled by Ry Cooder on "Jazz". Finally figured out the sequence, it has taken me years to get the nuances. Don't think I would have the nerve to sing those lyrics these days. Even though I do "wear my jeans like a man of means and always dress up in the latest style".

Emmet Miller is another guy who recorded some amazing stuff with a hot band, Eddie Lang on guitar, that's well nigh unsingable in public. Pity.

Anyway back to MANDOLINS...
Title: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Murphydog on April 18, 2006, 08:03:19 AM
Hello there, its been a while since I posted. I've been working on my fingerstyle but now a distraction has cropped up in the form of mandolin. I picked up a nice '30s A model Gibson which is crying out to have some blues played on it.
Can anybody point me in the direction of mando based material both to listen to nad learn from?
Thanks,Paul.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 18, 2006, 08:09:20 AM
Hi Paul -check here (http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?amp;Itemid=83&topic=282.0) and here (http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?amp;Itemid=83&topic=1675.0). Lots of good recommendations. I am jealous of your Gibson.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: waxwing on April 18, 2006, 08:10:18 AM
You mibht check out this other thread titled, oddly enough, Mandolin Blues (http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?amp;Itemid=83&topic=282.0). Then try the Forum Search function.

All for now.
John C.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Murphydog on April 18, 2006, 08:47:43 AM
Doh!     I might have known there would already be tons of stuff. How about instructional material? The Steve James looks promising.
Paul
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Murphydog on April 18, 2006, 08:49:37 AM
Ok forget the last post, I just checked the other link. Looks like you've got it covered already. Great site this!
Paul
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on April 29, 2006, 03:57:17 PM
Hi all,
For those of you on the look-out for Blues Mandolin repertoire, there are some great tunes on "That Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of", on Yazoo, that I don't believe have been previously mentioned on this thread:
   * "Ginseng Blues" by the Kentucky Ramblers
   * "Wild Cat Rag" by Asa Martin & Roy Hobbs
   * "Alabama Blues" by The Three Stripped Gears. 
"Alabama Blues" sounds like it is actually played on a banjo-mandolin, but since it is tuned and fingered the same as a conventional mandolin it should work well.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Flatd7 on April 29, 2006, 04:11:42 PM
Wow, John, all three of those sound great. I was able to hear snipits on Amazon and will order it up, forth right. Alabama Blues especially sounds promising. I recently picked up an old SS Stewart Banjolin and am having quite a bit of fun with it. I'll have to sit down and add it to my repertoire.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on May 02, 2006, 11:34:20 AM
John, you're right, these are all great tunes for mandolin. The Three Stripped Gears have come up before (perhaps on the old listserv) as recommended by Repp. There are a couple tracks on Document DOCD 5461 Too Late Too Late Vol 6, and on DOCD 5392 Hokum Blues and Rags.

The Kentucky Ramblers' Ginseng Blues is really haunting to me, with a truly beautiful melody. As someone mentioned, this song is also available on the JSP Mountain Blues: Blues, Ballads and String bands 1927-38 set (in worse sound). There are several other cuts on that set of interest to mandolin-ophiles. The ones the leap to mind immediately are three tracks by the Three Tobacco Tags - V8 Blues, Reno Blues, and Jersey Bull Blues. That JSP set is a really nice collection. I think Montgomery has mentioned here on Weenie somewhere that the sound on the set is not tremendous. I bow to his judgement there, and certainly agree on tracks I've compared like Ginseng Blues. But the collection has a lot to recommend it in my opinion, including three Dick Justice tracks, some great Gene Autry, Bill Cox, the Carolina Tar Heels, and a lot more (see here (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006FU4ZA/qid=1146593558/sr=1-5/ref=sr_1_0_5/103-8759595-8908656?n=5174)). And the overall sound as compared to what we're often used to for some old blues records is of quite good quality. Just that it seems there are better remasterings out there.

I'll have to update the master list...
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on May 19, 2006, 09:53:48 AM
A couple more additions to those seeking to expand their mandolin listening collections. Two recent additions to the Juke feature a lot of mando.

All the Walter Taylor titles on the John Byrd and Walter Taylor Complete Recorded Works CD have an unknown mandolin player featured in varying degrees of prominence in a washboard/jug band style. They are not the flashiest or best band of this sort, but a good part of their material has been growing on me. Walter Taylor is also known as Washboard Walter.

More immediately impressive is Al Miller, whose Complete Recorded Works were just added to the Juke. Excellent mandolin playing, so nice that I'm surprised his name isn't mentioned more often. He might be best known for his version(s) of Somebody's Been Using That Thing, and I'd say he is someone to mention in the same breath as Charlie McCoy. The style leans more towards vaudeville-influenced material and hokum, with a little bluesier material. Miller is also a very good singer and this disc is a real hidden treasure in my opinion. Those interested should request Al Miller tracks on the Juke and hear for yourselves if you're not familiar with him.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: dj on May 19, 2006, 10:53:49 AM
I'd like to second Uncle Bud's recommendation of Al Miller.  One of my favorites of his is the instrumental Saturday Night Hymn.  I'm also partial to his versions of the pop songs I Found A Four Leaf Clover and Someday Sweetheart - they're rare examples of a part of most "blues" singers' repertoires that was woefully underrecorded.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: phhawk on May 19, 2006, 10:59:39 PM
Howdy everyone,

Regarding Al Miller; Did the complete Al Miller include the King Mutt sides? He was the mandolin player on those sides. I think the two sides of that session that feature his playing the best are "Nut House Stomp" and "Original Stomps".

Also regarding Charlie McCoy; be sure and check out the Harlem Hamfats sides. I think some of his best mandolin work is on these sides, although in smaller doses. "Growling Dog Blues" comes to mind and I'm pretty sure that there are a at least a few other great sides from those sessions that his mandolin is featured on.

Later, Phil
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Flatd7 on May 20, 2006, 05:23:29 AM
I've been listening to Mike Compton and David Long's CD STOMP, quite a bit lately. Mike is best known as a Monroe purist. This new CD is intersting because it is one of the only mandolin duo albums, I've ever heard of. They have also dug further back to old time string band music for this album.

Of specific interest to Weenie's, they do the following tunes:

The Charlie McCoy classic - Vicksburg Stomp
Broonzy's - How Do You Want It Done?
The Old Ark's A Movin
Evening Prayer Blues

It's a great recording that is well worth adding to the Mandolin Blues library.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: dj on May 20, 2006, 05:46:14 AM
Quote
Did the complete Al Miller include the King Mutt sides?

The Document Al Miller CD does not include the sides with Miller accompanying King Mutt and his Tennessee Thumpers.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: phhawk on May 20, 2006, 08:50:33 PM
Thanks for the reply dj.

I think Al Miller also does all the vocals on those sides. I have put one of sides up on the Weenie Juke, "Good Time Mama". Amazingly (through persistance and blind luck) I have collected all 7 sides of the Mutt session on original issue, and if I can ever get my record player and CD burner repaired and back together at one time I'll try to Burn them on to a CD so they can be put on the Juke; if they want them? I'm supposed to be able to pick up my system from the repair shop this week. Who knows? Maybe it will all work this time. I'm not holding my breath though!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on May 21, 2006, 11:46:30 AM
Hi all,
I have not heard the Mike Compton/David Long disc that Jon cites, but I'd rate Mike very highly as a player, based what I've heard him do in the past.  He's from Mississippi, and has an especially good feeling for the Blues, whether in Bluegrass or earlier music.  He's the real deal.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on May 23, 2006, 12:06:49 PM
Does anyone know who the mandolin player is on Tommy Bradley's "Please Don't Act That Way"? I just caught this on the Juke and don't think I've heard it before.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on May 23, 2006, 12:19:25 PM
Does anyone know who the mandolin player is on Tommy Bradley's "Please Don't Act That Way"? I just caught this on the Juke and don't think I've heard it before.
The last three editions of B&GR have given it as Eddie Dimmitt. Such consistency of information would suggest to me that the info came from record company files, or similar. Anybody any the wiser for this information? I sure as hell ain't ;D
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on May 23, 2006, 12:28:52 PM
As a footnote to the above, Paul Oliver ends his sleevenotes to Tommie Bradley-James Cole Groups 1930-32 (Matchbox MSE211, 1983) with the proposition "Perhaps this album will prompt somebody to do some research on this unjustly neglected cluster of musicians - they could do worse than start in Cincinatti." Does anybody have Document DOCD-5189? Perhaps note writer Dick Spottswood took him up on the suggestion...
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on May 23, 2006, 12:42:27 PM
The thing I hate about the web is that it tempts me to rush "in to print" before thinking things through.  "Please Don't Act That Way" was first reissued on a 1973 Mamlish compilation, Mississippi Bottom Blues, note writers Kent & Stewart say:

"The real point of origin of Tommie Bradley and his mandolin accompanist is problematical. Virtually nothing is known of these musicians, and this song is yet another perfect example of why this is true: there is no constant feature of their music which gives them away. A rumor has placed them somewhere in the Jackson, Miss., area; their general string band sides are not unlike those of the Mississippi Sheiks, so it is a possibility. Bradley plays this piece in the key of C in a style which uses some of the Arkansas runs of Big Bill and Hambone Willie Newbern, but which has an up-tempo rolling effect to it which is quite unfamiliar. As well as displaying an unusual and clean style of picking, Bradley does some left-hand work which is beyond the call of duty, including the use of the C-shape on the uppcr reaches of the neck. Although the ambience of Please Don't Act That Way seems Mississpian, Bradley and friend, in all honesty, could have as easily come from Alabama, North Carolina, Arkansas or Cincinatti."
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Slack on May 23, 2006, 12:51:55 PM
Quote
The thing I hate about the web is that it tempts me to rush "in to print" before thinking things through. 

Oh sure Bunker, blame it on the web.    :P

You can always go back and edit your original message or even delete the whole thing (you have full editorial control  ;) ) 

...and then put a little note at the bottom.. "edited because.... "   

The software will then mark the message as "new" but not put it on folks unread list... which is for newly created messages.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on May 23, 2006, 12:55:58 PM
Thanks for the technical tips which are duly noted and digested. "edited due to knee-jerk reactions" would not go amiss in this instance.....
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on May 23, 2006, 06:23:24 PM
Does anybody have Document DOCD-5189? Perhaps note writer Dick Spottswood took him up on the suggestion...

I have the CD, but the notes don't really shed any further light on who Tommie Bradley or James Cole really were:

Quote
Is the James Cole who primitively fiddles his way through "Bill Cheatum" (normally "Cheatham") and "I Got A Gal" in 1928 the same man who plays on the 1930-32 recordings? I think there are stylistic links, though the later sides show a less exotic technique. Who is "Tommie Bradley"? The voice on the 1930 "Pack Up Her Trunk Blues" is not the same as that on the 1931-32 offerings, which are by a singer whose delivery resembles that of Georgia Tom Dorsey. For that matter, the voice on "Window Pane Blues" resembles the one credited to Buster Johnson on "Undertaker Blues".

And where were they from? Previous scholarship has suggested a number of possible origins, but the Cole/Bradley records show so little stylistic unity that no one can say for sure. I feel there is some reason to suggest that they may have been from central/western Kentucky, where, even by the 1920's, black and white string band styles and repertoire were still quite close.

The fiddler on the later sides definitely sounds like a different person to me - more like Lonnie Johnson's fiddling.  In fact, the whole group on "Undertaker Blues" sounds a bit like the Blue Boys with the addition of a washboard player (and a different singer, of course).  The sound on the earlier sides is rawer.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on September 26, 2006, 08:09:22 AM
More mandolin content that doesn't seem to have appeared in this thread so far.

The Birmingham Jug Band recorded 9 tunes in 1930, 8 of which are available on Document's DOCD 5140 Jaybird Coleman and the Birmingham Jug Band (1 remains unfound, I presume?). Discographical information on the CD is not definite on these guys: personnel are listed as both "unknown" and, with information coming from Big Joe Williams, possibly Jaybird Coleman (hca), Joe Williams, One-Armed Dave Miles, Dr. Scott, and Bogus Ben Covington gtr/mand., Honeycup (jug), New Orleans Slide (washboard).

Whether it is Covington/Curry or not, the mandolin playing is excellent and the material is really great. German Blues is a hugely fun mando tune. Port Townsend Weenies will also recall the Hohoppas Jug Band playing this band's wonderful Bill Wilson, a John Henry-soundalike tune. The tracks on this disc are:

16. German Blues
17. Cane Brake Blues
18. Wild Cat Squall
19. Bill Wilson
20. Birmingham Blues
21. Gettin' Ready for Trial
22. Giving It Away
23. Kickin' Mule Blues

(The other tracks are devoted to Coleman, a whole 'nuther story and fabulous singer/harp player who has his own thread somewhere here on Weenie).

The Birmingham Jug Band are one of the most appealing jug bands I've heard, and while these sides are fairly rough (and a little repetitive between tracks 20-22), I'd consider them essential for jug band, harmonica and mandolin nuts.


Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: waxwing on September 26, 2006, 09:17:20 AM
Quote
The Birmingham Jug Band are one of the most appealing jug bands I've heard, and while these sides are fairly rough (and a little repetitive between tracks 20-22), I'd consider them essential for jug band, harmonica and mandolin nuts.

You got that right, UB.

All for now.
John C.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: zoner on September 28, 2006, 12:24:29 PM
The Birmingham Jug Band Rocks!!!!!!!! ;)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Buzz on September 29, 2006, 06:43:45 PM
Yup, the BJB recorded some great stuff. I like playing it a lot.

Also the King David Jug Band: 'Tear it Down" is killer, both the banjo-mandolin featured, and the lyrics:

"I'm a doodle, I'm a doodle,I'm a doodle,I'm a doodle,
"I'm a doodle, I'm a doodle,I'm a doodle,I'm a doodle,
"I'm a doodle, I'm a doodle,I'm a doodle,I'm a doodle,
"I'm a doodle, I'm a doodle,I'm a doodle,I'm a ...
Catch another mule kickin' in your stall, gonna tear it on down!"

I get to this part and I crack a smile, or I laugh so hard I gotta stop playing...


Buzz
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on November 02, 2006, 10:13:58 PM
Hi all,
I've been listening a lot lately to Bobby Leecan & Robert Cooksey, and in one of their ensembles, Bobby Leecan's Need More Band, they had a very strong mandolin player, Alfred Martin.  Martin favors tuning the mandolin in octave courses, as did Howard Armstrong.  It makes for a very penetrating (some might say piercing) sound.  The four cuts played by this group, "Washboard Cut-Out", "Shortnin' Bread", "Midnight Susie" and "Apaloosa Blues" are all excellent, and "Shortnin' Bread", in particular, is of "die happy" quality.  The band, which consisted of Robert Cooksey on harmonica, Bobby Leecan on guitar, Alfred Martin on mandolin, an unknown cellist and Eddie Edinborough on washboard is stellar--sometimes the cello sounds like a tenor sax!  Leecan and Cooksey were kind of miraculously accomplished musicians.  I have never heard a better back-up guitarist in this style of music than Bobby Leecan.  These cuts can all be found on "Bobby Leecan & Robert Cooksey, Volume 2" on Document, DOCD-5280.  I was just able to obtain both this CD and Vol. 1 of Leecan & Cooksey (DOCD-5279) from Roots and Rhythm.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: mr mando on November 15, 2006, 01:23:17 AM
For those of you on the look-out for Blues Mandolin repertoire, there are some great tunes on "That Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of", on Yazoo, that I don't believe have been previously mentioned on this thread:
   * "Ginseng Blues" by the Kentucky Ramblers
   * "Wild Cat Rag" by Asa Martin & Roy Hobbs
   * "Alabama Blues" by The Three Stripped Gears. 

Just wanted to second Johnm's thumbs up. I did a transcription of "Wild Cat Rag". It's in C with basically two parts (A-part and B-part if you want) that get repeated over and over with very little variation in the melody but quite some variation (even harmonically) in the rhythm guitar part. Anyway, the mandolin melody is very nice and has an old-timey ragtime feel, even though it holds a surprising amount of chromatic tones. If anyone's interested, I could post a tab here or maybe better on the "licks and lessons" forum.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on October 29, 2008, 01:09:44 PM
I was listening to Speckled Red, Complete Works, DOCD-5205, and realized there's mandolin on a number of tracks played by Willie Hatcher. Red's piano sometimes overwhelms the backup band, recorded in 1938, but the mando is there on 10 tracks or so.

Red is great.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 19, 2009, 07:33:42 AM
Just thought I would add Craig Ventresco to the list of contemporary players. There are four mandolin tracks on his CD with Meredith Axelrod, and while they aren't blues, they are ragtimey, and include St. Louis Tickle.

And mr. mando, if three years later is not too late, I'd been interested in that transcription you did of Wild Cat Rag. Licks and Lessons is probably the best spot for it, as you suggest.

edited to add: the list in Weeniepedia (http://www.weeniecampbell.com/wiki/index.php?title=Blues_Mandolin_Listening) has been updated.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 21, 2009, 01:51:36 PM
Again, while not exactly what you'd call blues, the recordings by Ciro's Club Coon Orchestra found on the Earliest Black String Bands Vol 1 (DOCD-5622) feature what is surely a mandolin-banjo rather prominently on every track. B&GR list the instrument as a "banjoline" and I presume they mean a mandolin-banjo. dj introduced us to this record here (http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?amp;Itemid=128&topic=5391.0), which is pretty fascinating given how rare a glimpse into this repertoire there is on record. It's also on the Juke.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on May 06, 2009, 10:04:19 PM
Thanks to Bunker Hill's post of the Charlie McCoy article elsewhere on this forum, I've added some entries (Curtis Jones, Mattie Hardy, Monkey Joe) to Charlie's listings, and cleaned things up a bit for him, since they were a mess.

Also added Memphis Minnie's one mandolin track, After While Blues.

Updates are reflected in Weeniepedia.


Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on May 07, 2009, 08:58:57 AM
Thanks to Bunker Hill's post of the Charlie McCoy article elsewhere on this forum, I've added some entries (Curtis Jones, Mattie Hardy, Monkey Joe) to Charlie's listings, and cleaned things up a bit for him, since they were a mess. Also added Memphis Minnie's one mandolin track, After While Blues.
I have the Mattie Hardy's, the designation  is "prob. Charlie McCoy" but it sure sounds like him to my uneducated ear. I'd gladly supply an mp3 of one of the two songs. Just send me a PM.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Bunker Hill on May 07, 2009, 10:58:49 AM
Herb Quinn, whom David Evans recorded in 1966 plays a "mean mandolin".

Also I have a 10 inch Leadbelly LP where he's accompanied on at least one song by Woody Guthrie playing the instrument. I'll have to unearth it and see if my memory is serving me well. ::)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on May 08, 2009, 08:04:09 AM
Herb Quinn, whom David Evans recorded in 1966 plays a "mean mandolin".

Also I have a 10 inch Leadbelly LP where he's accompanied on at least one song by Woody Guthrie playing the instrument. I'll have to unearth it and see if my memory is serving me well. ::)

I hadn't heard of Herb Quinn and found the following on Jeff Harris's site (http://sundayblues.org/archives/67) in an article he did about mandolin blues awhile ago:
Quote
Two mandolin players, Luther Huff and Herb Quinn, had roots in the pre-war era but made their records in the post-war era. Luther and brother Percy were born in Fannin, MS. Both men spent time in Jackson where they were influenced by the music of Slim Duckett, Tommy Johnson, Ishmon Bracey and Charlie McCoy. Under Luther Huff?s name the duo cut four sides for Trumpet in 1951. Herb Quinn was born in 1896 and dominated the music of Tylertown, MS where Tommy Johnson spent a good deal of time. He was proficient on mandolin, violin, string bass and piano. He had a string band that played in the region six nights a week for both black and white dances and taught many younger musicians in the area. Quinn recorded three sides under his own name in 1966 as well as backing Roosevelt Holts, Babe Stovall and Isaac Youngblood.


Luther Huff discographical reference from SundayBlues.org:
Luther & Percy Huff - Delta Blues - 1951 (Alligator)

I was able to gather this information on Herb Quinn from Stefan Wirz's Babe Stovall discography:

Herb Quinn
South Mississippi Blues (LP compilation Rounder 2009), Babe Stovall & Herb Quinn, "See See Rider"; Herb Quinn, "Casey"
Goin' Up the Country (LP compilation Rounder 2012) Herb Quinn - "Casey, You Can't Ride This Train"
The Legacy Of Tommy Johnson -(LP compilation, saydisc Matchbox SDM 224) Isaac Youngblood & Herb Quinn "Big Road Blues"
Box Of The Blues (CD compilation, Rounder CDROUN2171) Babe Stovall, Herb Quinn - "See See Rider"

I haven't tracked down any of the other Herb Quinn material, so any additional information is most welcome.

Re. Leadbelly and Woody Guthrie. The Document disc Leadbelly Complete Works 1939-47 Vol 5 (DOCD-5311) includes 8 tracks from a circa Oct. 1946 session in New York with Leadbelly, Guthrie and Cisco Houston. There is mandolin on several tracks: Alabama Bound, Stewball, Midnight Special, Green Corn, Fiddler's Dram. Unfortunately the Document disc lists no mandolin player and has both Woody and Cisco playing guitar. The discography in The Life and Legend of Leadbelly does the same. It doesn't sound at all like three guitars are present to me. Without evidence of other musicians taking part in the session, I would say that the discography should read "prob. Woody Guthrie, mandolin" on the above titles. Woody is providing backup vocals, but from what I can tell, while he is singing the mandolin is either dropped, very faint, or chord strums. Perhaps Bunker Hill's Leadbelly EP has more information?
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Lyndvs on May 09, 2009, 07:40:31 AM
Tom Stovall plays mandolin on Jewel"babe"Stovall`s "careless love" on his Flyright lp-not very well recorded but it`s a really pretty version.
take care lyndvs.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on September 01, 2009, 06:48:45 AM
I've been listening to the Skillet Lickers lately, Volume 6 1934 DOCD-8061 to be precise, and while it isn't country blues, it is great old music, and much (all? haven't confirmed, still new to the disc) of the music includes tremendous mandolin playing from Ted Hawkins. This CD is part of Document's current sale, so one can get it cheap if innerested. Full disclosure - mine came as one of those new Document CD-Rs.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on September 01, 2009, 09:17:36 PM
Another group that's not quite country blues, but plenty of rags - the Scottdale Stringband.  Rags, waltzes, breakdowns, some blues...  a little bit of everything.  Mandolin with guitar accompaniment.  Chinese Breakdown smokes.

Not sure if much is available on CD, but it's definitely available through Juneberry.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on September 02, 2009, 06:29:24 AM
Funny, when I look up Scottdale String Band on emusic, their "Dig deeper on the Net" feature has two YouTube videos, both of weenie member samjessin.

Similar thing happened in Winamp the other day. I loaded a Wade Ward song and the video links at the bottom of the Winamp frame took me to one of frankie's videos.

It's like a global conspiracy...
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on September 02, 2009, 02:41:37 PM
A conspiracy?  I wish...  that'd mean there's more than two of us that are hare-brained enough to try and play stuff like that.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on November 17, 2009, 09:06:40 AM
Prewar gospel, not blues, but still fits our purposes for this thread I think: four songs recorded by Arizona Dranes feature an unknown mandolin player. Piano-mandolin duets w/ vocal chorus from a session on July 3 1928. The songs are on Document's Arizona Dranes 1926-29 DOCD-5186 and JSP's Spreading the Word set. "I Shall Wear a Crown," "God's Got a Crown," "He Is My Story," and "Just Look."
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: BottleneckJohn on November 24, 2009, 01:17:01 AM
I'd like to recommend a listen to a guy called Christer Lyssarides who plays some awesome blues mandolin on Eric Bibb's two first CD's "Good Stuff" and "Spirit & the blues"..
If you haven't heard it already?  :)
He plays both wood top mando's and a banjolin there and it's really nice!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: 67rene on May 16, 2010, 06:28:22 AM
this is my version of Grind So Fine from the CD Walter Vincson & Charlie McCoy BD612 recorded Jan 17, 1931

let me know what you think !

http://www.youtube.com/v/0f_iTO5t3hU&hl

not sure why the screen shows twice ? can one of the moderators correct this pease ? thanks
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Slack on May 16, 2010, 06:39:54 AM
67rene, no need to include all the embedded stuff - a simple link to youtube will do and the forum software takes care of the rest.

Fine song and an excellent job!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: unezrider on May 16, 2010, 05:58:28 PM
hello friend,
cool performance! i love blues played on the mandolin. & in my opinion, we don't hear enough of it. (& for fear of being banned from this site, i wont mention how i love blues played on a banjo as well  ;))
chris
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Parlor Picker on May 17, 2010, 01:55:10 AM
Most enjoyable, thanks!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Pan on May 17, 2010, 02:46:42 AM
this is my version of Grind So Fine from the CD Walter Vincson & Charlie McCoy BD612 recorded Jan 17, 1931

let me know what you think !

http://www.youtube.com/v/0f_iTO5t3hU&hl

Very nice indeed! Thanks for posting!

Cheers

Pan
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: btasoundsradio on May 17, 2010, 08:40:51 AM
one of my favorite mando blues cuts - Yank Rachell and Shirley Griffith "Mellow Peaches" off of The Art of Field Recording Vol. 1, the blues disc. Yank has inspired my playing more than anyone I think. 2 Poor Boys as well. My band:
Baltimore String Felons - myspace.com/thefelonfamily
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: 67rene on May 30, 2010, 11:28:58 AM
thanks Slack for correcting the link and thanks everybody for the kind words, glad you like !

I feel encouraged to place another link  8)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvNWe6qyXhU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvNWe6qyXhU)

cheers Ren?
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: MuddyBuddy on September 07, 2010, 03:51:41 AM
great stuff Ren?!

cheers
BERT
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on September 10, 2010, 05:44:35 AM
Hi all,
I was wondering if any of you mandolin-playing Weenies had ever figured any of Furry Lewis's first three recorded cuts, "Everybody's Blues", "Mr. Furry's Blues", and "Sweet Papa Moan", all of which had Charles Jackson (or Johnson, according to Document) playing mandolin.  They are all good numbers, and I have never heard anyone do them.  

"Sweet Papa Moan" is particularly cool; it is modeled melodically on "Black Snake Moan", and Charles Jackson does some great things on it.  The song is played out of a C position, and Jackson starts out holding a double stop over the I chord that you would nornally associate with the V chord--G on the E pair (third fret) and B on the A pair (second fret).  The sound of that double stop against the C chord Furry playing is pretty exotic.  It suggests a C major 7 chord, not a sound you normally associate with Country Blues, but not at all "loungy" or uptown-sounding, as it might be in other contexts.  Jackson continues to play the same double stop against the IV chord, and the effect is even more exotic--against the F chord, the G note is a 9 and the B note is a #11, or flat 5.  Once again, the sound is not sophisticated or Jazzy, but really just a neat kind of droning, like holding an open fiddle string against a melody as it passes through a chord change.  It sounds great.

Hearing a Lemon-ish model for a mandolin tune made me think how much more of his material might really suit the mandolin.  "Black Horse Blues", which has gotten a lot of attention on this site, could be a real mandolin tour de force, and I think "Easy Rider" would be great, too, with it's signature lick repeating over and over in between the vocal lines.  It's kind of a way to make something new from something old.
All best,
Johnm

Was just listening to Sweet Papa Moan this morning and 5 years later it sounds even more like Black Snake Moan to me  :P, the melody basically lifted and set down on some different chords. It sure is a great tune. I agree, time to revisit Lemon on mandolin.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on September 14, 2010, 08:49:40 AM
Another to add to the list. In April 1929 in Chicago, Clara Burston recorded "Weak and Nervous Blues" and "Georgia Man Blues" with an unknown mandolin player. You can find it on Barrelhouse Women 1925-30 Vol 1 DOCD-5378.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: 67rene on October 04, 2010, 04:12:14 AM
this is me on mandolin backing up Willie Salomon

hope you like it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uGpQWxVPlE

cheers, Ren?
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Parlor Picker on October 04, 2010, 06:00:48 AM
Sure would have liked to have been at that gig!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Pan on October 04, 2010, 09:21:34 AM
Good work, Ren?.

And the company isn't bad either!  ;)

Any plans for Berlin shows?

Cheers

Pan
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: frankie on October 06, 2010, 03:21:51 AM
this is me on mandolin backing up Willie Salomon

nice, rene!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: dj on October 11, 2010, 08:08:19 AM
Lonnie Clark recorded Broke Down Engine (not the Willie McTell song) and Down In Tennessee for Paramount in 1929.  Lonnie sang and played piano.  He was accompanied by an unknown mandolin player.  The mandolin playing is nice, though unfortunately the instrument is under-recorded.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on October 13, 2010, 12:20:55 PM
Another couple of tunes to add to the list. In c. March 1924, Milas and Miles Pruitt backed up Ida Cox on "Mean Lovin' Man Blues" and "Down the Road Bound Blues", with Milas playing what sounds like a banjo mandolin (listed as bj in B&GR) and Miles on guitar. Takes 3 for both these are available on Ida Cox Vol 2 1924-25 DOCD-5323, with Takes 1 for both available on Classic Blues, Jazz and Vaudeville Singers Vol. 3 DOCD-5626.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: 67rene on February 25, 2011, 04:23:07 AM
Baby Got The Rickets by Vol Stevens 1927 , 1 of 2 songs recorded under his own name ( he plays with the Memphis Jug Band )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRWuM59vrZY (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRWuM59vrZY)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: nobocaster on February 26, 2011, 08:52:26 AM
Rene,

  Sounds great!  The tone of that mando sounds cool.. very unique.  What type of pick are you using?

  ~Devin
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Stumblin on February 27, 2011, 04:58:25 AM
Fantastic, I love it. My next instrument will be a banjolin!
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 11, 2011, 02:00:04 PM
Another song to add to the list. The singer Cora Perkins recorded 2 songs on 14 May, 1926. "Today Blues" features an unknown mandolin player quite prominently, with an aggressive tremelo and bluesy style. Lonnie Johnson backed her up on violin. The tune can be found on Document's Blue Girls Vol 3, DOCD-5646.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Stumblin on April 11, 2011, 03:09:03 PM
Another song to add to the list. The singer Cora Perkins recorded 2 songs on 14 May, 1926. "Today Blues" features an unknown mandolin player quite prominently, with an aggressive tremelo and bluesy style. Lonnie Johnson backed her up on violin. The tune can be found on Document's Blue Girls Vol 3, DOCD-5646.
Is it on Weenie Juke Radio?
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 11, 2011, 03:25:50 PM
Yes. You can check for songs on the Juke using the Playlist and Requests menu item on the Juke page.

http://weeniecampbell.com/juke/playlist.php?limit=25
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on December 04, 2011, 08:49:43 AM
Just came across another mandolinist who hasn't been mentioned. Mandolin player Kid West recorded with guitarist Joe Harris during a Library of Congress field recording session in 1940 in Shreveport, Louisiana. This was the same trip on which Oscar "Buddy" Woods got recorded by the LoC, two days earlier, and on Woods' earlier commercial sessions with the Wampus Cats, Harris is in fact listed as possible 2nd guitar (was this ever confirmed)?

Anyway, Kid West recorded 8 tracks with Harris, some fairly raggy blues. Some of them (East Texas Blues, Kid West Blues, and A-Natural Blues) are available on I Can Eagle Rock: Juke Joint Blues Library of Congress Recordings 1940-41 on Travelin' Man.

Joe Harris does a nice ragtime piece on solo guitar, Baton Rouge Rag, as well.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 11, 2012, 02:31:54 PM
Some quite nice mandolin playing from John Copeland, who was recorded with Tom Johnson on guitar by Frederic Ramsey Jr. as "Mississippi String Band", though they were just playing together in a pick-up string band session arranged in Vicksburg, Miss., on June 29, 1954.

Four songs appear on Music from the South, Vol. 5: Song, Play, and Dance (http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetails.aspx?itemid=432), on Smithsonian Folkways.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 12, 2012, 08:03:33 AM
It's hard for me to hear it clearly, but sounds like a banjo mandolin on this version of The Ducks Yas Yas by Jack o' Diamonds, from 1929. Document and B&GR list unknown banjo. Thoughts?

I've updated the Weeniepedia Mandolin listening (http://weeniecampbell.com/wiki/index.php?title=Blues_Mandolin_Listening) page. More than 24 prewar blues mandolin players, not including old-time or contemporary players.



[attachment deleted by admin]
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: mr mando on April 13, 2012, 01:40:14 AM
Thoughts?

Yes!    ;)


It sounds like two banjos to me. A tenor chopping out 4 to the bar chords in the middle and higher portions of the neck and a banjo mandolin tremoloing on the lower strings.


Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on April 14, 2012, 07:51:08 AM
I think you may be right mr mando. It really sounds like two banjo-style instruments, and the tremolos aren't very chordal the way one might expect on a plectrum or tenor, more mandolin.

I will add it to the list.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: mr mando on April 14, 2012, 09:42:25 AM
Listening again, I realized both instruments play in the same register at the start of the tune. The tenor chord is 7-7-9-10 (g-d-b-g) and the mandoln plays tremolo the two highest strings (x-x-2-3). The second chord on the tenor is 9-8-9-9 (B7), and the mandolin seems to tremoloe two notes again (x-x-0-2). So the top notes are the same at the beginning. Later, though, the mandolin changes to a lower register.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Rivers on September 07, 2012, 06:16:11 PM
Just a shout out for Johnny Young's mandolin playing on this thread. Johnny played guitar as well. In addition to his excellent mandolin I like his guitar playing, vocalizing and that 60's Chicago sound in general.

Chicago Blues (Arhoolie) has four (I believe) tracks with Young on mando, and is an all around classic album I reckon, what with Otis Spann, James Cotton and Walter Horton on board.

Johnny plays mandolin on seven tracks on Johnny Young and His Friends (Testament). Accompanists include Spann, John Lee Granderson, Walter Horton, Little Walter Jacobs and Robert Nighthawk.

Rich DelGrosso did an excellent class at Port T exploring JY's playing, which is why I thought I'd mention it after picking up the aforementioned records.

Johnny Young page from Stefan's site: http://www.wirz.de/music/youngfrm.htm (http://www.wirz.de/music/youngfrm.htm)

And a nice shot from Stefan's site:
(https://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wirz.de%2Fmusic%2Fyoung%2Fgrafik%2Fyoung1.jpg&hash=602e199ace7ce3b34e22c4e2b7a7a2ea4ac4926e)
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: MuddyBuddy on September 08, 2012, 02:04:24 AM
Hi,

since my focus is mainly on Yank Rachell and Carl Martin, I would be really interested in hearing what Rich had to say about Johnny Young's playing, if anybody has an audio file from the course! I would gladly trade a download of my latest blues mandolin album, KID MAN BLUES, for a listen to the file. Rich is a great guy and surely a great teacher. I don't play Johnny Young at all, but have listened to his albums and looked for his signature licks. Since he was the only electric player that emerged AFTER WWII he is an important figure, in that sense for blues mandolin history.

all the best
BERT
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on September 08, 2012, 07:57:22 AM
Rich covers some Johnny Young styles in his book, Mandolin Blues.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: MuddyBuddy on September 08, 2012, 08:30:13 AM
Yes I have the book. Just thought it would be nice to listen to Rich's own words.
Haven't seen him since around 2008 in Memphis.
Cheers
BERT
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Rivers on September 13, 2012, 06:46:52 PM
Three 'Baccer Tags, Get Your Head In Here, and Ain't Gonna Do It No More, available on the the Gastonia Gallop (Old Hat)  comp which is pretty indispensible all round IMO. These guys are particularly cool since they have two mandos in the band and a really good accompanying guitarist. There's also a lot of other really good stuff on Gastonia Gallop.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: uncle bud on October 29, 2013, 06:58:12 PM
For aspiring mandolin players, Homespun Tapes have Steve James' 2-volume Blues Mandolin lessons on sale for 50% till Wednesday midnight as a download only. Discount code is STEVEHAPPY.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Lastfirstface on October 29, 2013, 09:55:53 PM
I think I found one that isn't in the big list:

I was listening to some Bumble Bee Slim on youtube, and came across a track called "Someday Things Will Be Breaking My Way". Its a song in the "Sitting On Top of the World" mold with Easton's singing accompanied by piano, guitar, and mandolin. Looking in B&GR its seems the 78 I was listening to as well seven other sides from 1934,were credited to "Bumble Bee Slim and His Three Sharks", but it lists all accompanists as 'unknown'. Carl Martin on mando maybe? I'd like to hear the other cuts from this session.
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on December 01, 2015, 04:31:43 PM
Hi all,
I happened to find this track, "Jail Break Blues", by Texas Tommy.  I've never heard of the artist before,  and don't know who the mandolinist was, let alone the singer and tuba player.  Here is the track, and they have another one, "Trinity River Bottom Blues":

https://youtu.be/7XSkEa7KWLA

All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: dj on December 04, 2015, 05:31:16 PM
Quote
I've never heard of the artist before,  and don't know who the mandolinist was, let alone the singer and tuba player.

Texas Tommy's sides were recorded in Dallas Texas in "late October" of 1928.  The singer, guitar player, and tuba player are unknown.  The mandolin player is "possibly" Caffrie Darensbourg. 

I assume Caffrie was somehow related to Percy Darensbourg who played banjo with Frenchie's String Band in Dallas on December 5, 1928 and played guitar backing Effie Scott in the same city on October 26, 1929.  According to Blues: A Regional Experience, Percy was Percy L. D'Arensbourg, born in 1902 in Dallas.  You could assume similar biographical info for Caffrie.   
Title: Re: Mandolin Blues
Post by: Johnm on December 04, 2015, 07:10:48 PM
Thanks for that information, dj.  It's nice to get some background on the players.  I like the singer's trilled "r" sounds on that track--shades of Ethel Waters.
All best,
Johnm
SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2020, SimplePortal