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Country Blues => Weenie Campbell Main Forum => Topic started by: GhostRider on January 20, 2006, 01:38:26 PM

Title: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: GhostRider on January 20, 2006, 01:38:26 PM
Hey:

Every year about this time, I like to solicit recommendations of the best CB tunes that are 75 years old, that being 1931 this year. I like to perform at least one each time I play out, it seems to be a hit with the crowd, distracting them from my stumbling playing.

So, if you know of any good CB tunes from 1931, please post them here. I'll go through my stuff at home tonight and see what I can come up with.

Paul, are you out there ;)

Thanks,
Alex
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: phhawk on January 20, 2006, 07:21:56 PM
From the Columbia 14000 series released in 1931, 4 sides that jump out are Willie Walker, Dupree Blues/South Carolina Rag
Blind Sammie (Willie McTell), Broke Down Engine Blues/Southern Can Is Mine
Also:
Lil McClintock, Furniture Man/Don't Think I'm Santa Claus

On Victor:
Clifford Gibson, Old Time Rider/Brooklyn Blues
Blind Willie (Joe) Reynolds, Married Woman Blues/Third Street Woman Blues
Beans Hambone-El Morrow, Beans
Ben Ferguson, Try And Treat Her Right/Please Don't Holler, Mame

Of course there are some Memphis Jug Band, Cannon's Jug Stompers, Barbecue Bob etc.

These are just a few that I could find readily. I don't have an easy reference to the Vocalion, Okeh etc. sides but if I get a chance i'l try to dig some out.

regards, Phil
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: Slack on January 20, 2006, 07:32:36 PM
Quote
Beans Hambone-El Morrow, Beans

There you go Alex - you gotta do this one.  You can give the the "How did that get recorded?" spiel!

 8)
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: uncle bud on January 21, 2006, 08:27:43 AM
Yeah, I vote for Beans! A truly splendid tune.
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: Johnm on January 21, 2006, 09:44:34 AM
Hi Alex,
That Blind Joe Reynolds "Third Street Woman Blues" is terrific, and you never hear anyone do it.  Working that up would be a real coup.
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: dj on January 21, 2006, 10:26:17 AM
1931 was a pretty slim year for blues recording.  Though not as bad as 1932.  Good luck next year!  Here are a few more from 1931:

Curley Weaver and Clarence Moore:  Baby Boogie Woogie, Wild Cat Kitten

Charley Jordan:  Cheating Blues, Starvation Blues, Keep It Clean  - No. 2, Keep It Clean - No. 3, You Run And Tell Your Daddy, Tight Haired Mama Blues, Days Of The Week Blues, Silver Dollar Blues, Greyhound Blues, Workingman's Blues, Santa Claus Blues, Bad Breaks Blues

Teddy Darby: Deceiving Blues, Built Right On The Ground

Skip James: All his pre-war recordings
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: Bunker Hill on January 21, 2006, 11:00:10 AM
1931 was a pretty slim year for blues recording. 
SNIP
Skip James: All his pre-war recordings
That should make up for 18 songs not found elsewhere in the decade - how are you on that 'off-the-wall' James piano technique? ;D
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: Bunker Hill on January 21, 2006, 11:11:37 AM
Oh yes and whilst on the topic of pianists let's not forget Leroy Carr who recorded 8 titles in 1931 the best known being Low Down Dog Blues which is usually gets credited to Big Joe Turner as originator!
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: MTJ3 on January 21, 2006, 11:12:46 AM
"Nineteen Thirty-One Blues" by Leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell, recorded January 16, 1931.  Not their best or most interesting side, but a good "book end" for the year.  The otherwise immensely prolific duo recorded only 8 sides in 1931.  

The 6 solo sides recorded by Scrapper on November 24, 1931 (which include "Rambling Blues,"  "Down South Blues," "Sneaking Blues," and "Back Door Blues") are some his most interesting.
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: dj on January 21, 2006, 11:23:18 AM
Quote
1931 was a pretty slim year for blues recording.

Once you start looking, they do start popping out, don't they? 

Big Bill Broonzy:  How You Want It Done?, Station Blues

Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe:  12 issued titles

Tampa Red:  20 issued titles, including Things 'Bout Coming My Way, New Strangers Blues, Stop And Listen Blues

Mississippi Sheiks:  13 issued titles, including Things About Coming My Way, Bed Spring Poker, Lazy Lazy River
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: Bunker Hill on January 21, 2006, 11:44:42 AM
Quote
1931 was a pretty slim year for blues recording.
Once you start looking, they do start popping out, don't they? 
There was a reason for the dearth of recording in 1931/2 as Dixon & Godrich outlined in their chapter 'Hard Times 1931-1932' (Recording The Blues, Studio Vista, 1970, reprinted in Yonder Comes The Blues, Cambridge UP, 2001). In short record sales had plummeted by May 1930 in the wake of the 'Crash', companies then cut pressing runs to 3-4 hundred copies per disc and finally only recorded those artists they knew would still manage to sell 3-4 hundred.
Did I hear some ask, "what has any of this has to do with the task as set?". Point taken. I do get carried away when it comes to matters historical.
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: GhostRider on March 15, 2006, 03:11:28 PM
Hi:

Whilst going some Funny Papa Smith lyrics, I noted that he recorded the majority of his output in 1931, 15 sides.

Alex
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: jharris on March 16, 2006, 11:48:01 AM
Let's not forget Lonnie Johnson who cut some terrific ones in 1931:

-"Uncle Ned, Don't Use Your Head"
(a remarkable guitar piece and humorous too)

Other fine ones include:

-"Low Down St. Louis Blues"
-"Blues Is Only A Ghost"
-"Beautiful But Dumb"
-"Hell Is A Name For All Sinners"

-Jeff
Title: Re: The Greatest Country Blues Hits of 1931
Post by: GhostRider on March 16, 2006, 11:58:24 AM
Jeff:

Thanks. I figured out "Low Down St. Louis Blues" a couple of years ago, had forgotten it was from 1931.

It uses a neat Dm chord.

Alex
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