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Country Blues => Super Electrical Recordings! => Discographies => Topic started by: Stefan Wirz on February 05, 2005, 10:33:01 AM

Title: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: Stefan Wirz on February 05, 2005, 10:33:01 AM
can be found here (http://www.wirz.de/music/brownrab.htm)

any other covers of R(R)B songs known to you?

(https://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wirz.de%2Fmusic%2Fbrownrab%2Fgrafik%2Fv205784.jpg&hash=cfe277ac89a36f6a79854458a62b9140db981931)
Title: Re: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: Johnm on February 05, 2005, 11:49:14 AM
Hi Stefan,
I am pretty sure that the late Judy Roderick recorded "James Alley Blues" on her first Vanguard album, accompanied by Dick Weissman, though the song may have not been listed under that title.  It may have been called "Born In The Country".
All best,
Johnm
Title: Re: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: Stefan Wirz on February 06, 2005, 03:28:02 AM
thank you very much,? John!
funny thing is that I built a Judy Roderick discography (http://www.wirz.de/music/roderdsc.htm) as part of my site a few years ago, and - even though I now remember that I've been very impressed by the JR version of 'Born in the country' - didn't think about it while building that Rabbit Brown page !
The more I appreciate any help given by you folks here (and in other places) !!!!
Stefan
(https://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wirz.de%2Fmusic%2Froderick%2Fgrafik%2Faint1.jpg&hash=99fc73d3e19e4d35045000d71d10407fae0ad415) (https://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wirz.de%2Fmusic%2Froderick%2Fgrafik%2Fwoman1.jpg&hash=c275c3e893f3f1e254f5b3f7cd3684a977e18d85)
Title: Re: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: Tail Dragger on February 15, 2005, 06:31:38 PM
Hi, folks - I've been a blues fan for years but I just joined the forum and this is my first post.  It's nice to finally be here.  I just wanted to throw in my two cents in, for what it's worth: David Johansen also covered "James Alley Blues" on his 2000 release entitled 'David Johansen & The Harry Smiths'.

Tail Dragger
Title: Re: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: uncle bud on February 15, 2005, 06:58:09 PM
Welcome to WC TailDragger. I've haven't heard Johansen's record but have heard good things about it. I remember him from my vinyl New York Dolls LP though. Now that takes me back.
Title: Re: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: Tail Dragger on February 15, 2005, 09:37:14 PM
Thanks for the welcome, Uncle Bud.  I'm looking forward to meeting new folks and exchanging blues information for - hopefully - years to come.

Tail Dragger
Title: Re: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: Rivers on February 16, 2005, 09:16:56 PM
Welcome to WC TailDragger. I've haven't heard Johansen's record but have heard good things about it. I remember him from my vinyl New York Dolls LP though. Now that takes me back.

We were sent a copy of it by some folks who stayed with us for a few days and I can confirm it's a surprisingly good record, given the NY Dolls were so far away from country blues. Very enjoyable set when you're in the mood for a slightly ragged & punky take on things.
Title: Re: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: Tail Dragger on February 17, 2005, 07:36:21 PM
It was mentioned that "the New York Dolls are so far away from country blues".  As long as we're more or less discussing covers of early blues classics - I suppose we are now - I have some thoughts to share, some of which will be stating the obvious but for those who haven't thought about it quite in this sense or for those new to blues music or both, here goes:

True blues pioneers - especially the early ones - have an influence that lasts to this day; having inspired musicians one would not expect to have fallen under the blues spell: Pat Benetar, Nirvana, John Mellencamp, and yes, David Johansen, are a few examples.  So much - if not all - of this music has been reissued in compact disc form allowing one to absorb the sounds of early greats such as Ma Rainey, Charley Patton, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Tommy Johnson, Bessie Smith and Papa Charlie Jackson - again, to name a few - some 80 years after they entered a recording studio. Most likely, unless one is a blues fan, the average person has never heard of Rainey, Patton, Jefferson, Johnson, Smith or Jackson, but their influence will NEVER fade - something we fans of (early) blues music should be proud of.

Having said this, today's "culture" gives out recording contracts like lottery tickets, making anyone with good looks and/or the ability to shock a "star" while putting a billion dollars in their bank accounts.  Put a good-looking person in a hat and cowboy boots and right away they become a "country star".  Will they still be listened to 70, 80 years down the road?  I HIGHLY doubt it. The world, sadly, just doesn't allow that kind of longevity the way it used to.

That sums it up.  I realized as I was halfway through this post that maybe I should have made this a topic unto itself.  I didn't, so forgive me if I should have.  In the meantime, keep your lamps trimmed and burnin'....

Tail Dragger


Title: Re: Richard (Rabbit) Brown discography online
Post by: whigski3 on February 17, 2005, 08:14:11 PM

Having said this, today's "culture" gives out recording contracts like lottery tickets, making anyone with good looks and/or the ability to shock a "star" while putting a billion dollars in their bank accounts.? Put a good-looking person in a hat and cowboy boots and right away they become a "country star".? Will they still be listened to 70, 80 years down the road?? I HIGHLY doubt it. The world, sadly, just doesn't allow that kind of longevity the way it used to.


That touched on something I think about recurringly--the high quality of much of the recorded music from the 20's and 30's versus the (overly abundant) music-for-the-masses produced today.??I feel sorry for future musicologists that will feel the need to wade through it all.?

People used to live with their music for years before they recorded it; now musicians are "forced" to produce beyond their capacity.

I know we're speaking from the same pulpit Tail Dragger, but I needed to vent...

Rev. Whigski? :D
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