collapse

* Member Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

* Like Us on Facebook

I just don't find any sadness in the blues... I get a happy feeling when I hear a guitar tuning up. - Etta Baker, quoted in Woman With Guitar: Memphis Minnie's Blues by Paul and Beth Garon

Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 149224 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 11686
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #555 on: January 20, 2015, 06:36:07 AM »
Yes, mr mando, that is the same performance, so you could work from that one, too.
All best,
Johnm

Offline Prof Scratchy

  • Member
  • Posts: 1689
  • Howdy!
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #556 on: January 22, 2015, 04:10:19 AM »
Hi all,
I've got another puzzler for you.  The song is "Hoot Your Belly", by Jimmy Lee Williams, and it is the title track of his Fat Possum CD.  No home should be without it.  Jimmy Lee was a farmer in Porlan, Georgia who was discovered and recorded by George Mitchell.  Thanks, George!  Here is the track:



The questions on "Hoot Your Belly" are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Jimmy Lee Williams use to play the song?
   * Where did Jimmy Lee fret, and how did he play his signature lick, which he starts playing at about :03 into the song?
   * What chords does Jimmy Lee play in the course of the song?

Please use only your ears and your guitars to arrive at your answers, and please don't post any answers before Wednesday morning, January 21.  Thanks for your participation, and I hope some of you folks who have been following the thread but not posting will participate.
All best,
Johnm

No takers for this one? I'm quietly confident, but think someone else should start the ball rolling! bnemerov??

Offline bnemerov

  • Member
  • Posts: 236
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #557 on: January 22, 2015, 05:26:36 AM »
My dear Prof.,
I've my hands full trying to harmonize those 17th & 18th C. tunes from your wee adopted country.
Dotted strathspey rhythms are already kicking my butt....I'll leave the Georgia farmer's playing to you.
best,
bruce

Offline Prof Scratchy

  • Member
  • Posts: 1689
  • Howdy!
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #558 on: January 22, 2015, 06:26:30 AM »
Dinnae fash yer sporran wi' they daft tunes,  pal!

Offline frankie

  • Member
  • Posts: 2439
    • DoneGone.net
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #559 on: January 22, 2015, 06:32:59 AM »
and now for something completely different...

I never did figure this one out too carefully, but it always sounded like std tuning, G position, with the signature lick played on the 2nd fret of the 4th ( D ) string essentially within the G chord (fretting finger is moved from the 2nd fret 5th string to the 2nd fret 4th string to play the lick). Picking hand thumb does the heavy lifting on the 4th and 6th strings and the index plays kind of an alternating drone on the high G note - 3rd fret, 1st string.

The whole thing is harmonized with 1st position G, C and D chords, seems to me.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2015, 07:30:18 AM by frankie »

Offline Slack

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 8882
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #560 on: January 22, 2015, 09:07:18 AM »
Yes, mr mando, that is the same performance, so you could work from that one, too.
All best,
Johnm

Very cool though that it is a different cut... I had not heard this version.  Quicker tempo, not as distorted.  Thanks for posting Mr Mando!

Offline Old Man Ned

  • Member
  • Posts: 315
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #561 on: January 22, 2015, 09:34:35 AM »
I'm in agreement with Frankie.  Listening to this last night, standard G was as far as I got.  I'd written off dropped G tuning as I couldn't hear the low D anywhere on the 6th string.  What was puzzling me though is that I also wasn't hearing anything on the 1st and 2nd strings when the G chord is played....apart from the wee run right at the end of the tune.  Don't know why that should puzzle me, but it did.

Offline Prof Scratchy

  • Member
  • Posts: 1689
  • Howdy!
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #562 on: January 22, 2015, 11:26:52 AM »
Yes, agreed - G/C/D with signature lick being a double hammer on 2nd fret of 4th string followed by two brushes of the top four strings of the G chord.

Offline mr mando

  • Member
  • Posts: 254
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #563 on: January 23, 2015, 02:15:02 AM »
Q: What playing position/tuning did Jimmy Lee Williams use to play the song?
A: Agree with frankie: std. tuning / G position

Q: Where did Jimmy Lee fret, and how did he play his signature lick, which he starts playing at about :03 into the song?
A: Agree with frankie: beat 1: thumb fret 3 on 6th string, beat 2: thumb strum strings 4, 3 and 2 open, beat 3: hammer from open 4th string to 2nd fret fourth string beat 3+: 1st string 3 fret, beat 4: like beat 3, beat 4+ like beat 3+.

Q: What chords does Jimmy Lee play in the course of the song?
A: starts on a G 1st Position chord, then, at 0:20 Em before switching to C7 at 0:21. Regular 1st position D chord at 0:27 followed by an F# (2nd fret 6th string) bass note. In the following run throughs of the form, he's not playing the Em anymore.

Offline Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 11686
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #564 on: January 23, 2015, 10:31:24 AM »
Hi all,
Thanks for your responses on the Jimmy Lee Williams "Hoot Your Belly" puzzler.  Here are the answers:
   * Jimmy Lee did play the song out of G position in standard tuning, just as every one of you had it.  Well done!
   * Similarly, Jimmy Lee's signature lick lies very much as Frank, Prof Scratchy and mr mando had it.  He struck the third fret of the sixth string on beat one, on beat two brushes the fourth, third and a bit of the second string, all open, on beat three hammers with his second finger to the second fret of the fourth string, followed by the third fret of the first string, picked on the + of beat three.  On beat four, he re-strikes the fourth string with his thumb, doing a grace note hammer to the second fret of the fourth string, and on the + of beat four re-picks the third fret of the first string.  The tricky aspect of the signature lick has to do, I think with the two hammers to the second fret of the fourth string; the first hammer is very lazy, with the fourth string struck open on beat two and the hammer not happening until beat three--the second hammer is instantaneous, with both the open fourth string and the hammered second fret arriving on beat four, essentially.  It gives the lick a neat feeling of speeding up as it goes, and the grace note hammer on beat four gives it a little rhythmic snap that drives it right into its next iteration.  If you enjoy signature lick tunes, as I do, I think you might particularly relish Jimmy Lee's knack for coming up with memorable signature licks--with "Hoot Your Belly" and "Have You Ever Seen Peaches?", he has two of the most infectious licks you're ever going to hear to his credit.
  * The chords are in the main, simply G, C and D at the base of the neck, but in mr mando's version of the song, which as John D. noted is not the same as the version I originally posted, Jimmy Lee does hit a momentary E minor chord, and in both versions he does hit a C7 during the course of his rendition.
One of the things I have most admired and enjoyed about Jimmy Lee Williams' music, and especially his original tunes, since I was first introduced to them by blueshome at Blues Week one summer (thanks, Phil!) is the feeling I get when listening to him that so much of what he did was just for himself and what sounded good to him.  His non-verbal vocalizations, harmonizing with his slide, etc. just seem to give his music a special quality I wish I encountered more often elsewhere.  Thanks to George Mitchell for finding and recording him and for Fat Possum for releasing his music on CD.  And if you don't have his CD, get it!
Thanks to all of you who participated, and I'll post another puzzler soon.  I felt like everyone heard this one really well, could figure it out, and may yet do so.  And it's great to have an occasion to transcribe his lyrics to "Hoot Your Belly"! 
All best,
Johnm

Offline Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 11686
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #565 on: January 25, 2015, 12:45:23 PM »
Hi all,
I have a new puzzler for those of you who are interested.  The song is "Hard Luck Man", as performed by Sonny Scott.  Sonny Scott is remembered, if he is remembered at all, as Walter Roland's duet partner on a number of really nice instrumental guitar duets, but I was surprised to find that he had more than a couple of titles released under his own name as well.  "Hard Luck Man", for that matter, is a duet, though it is not listed as such, and the seconding guitarist is pretty self-effacing, disappearing into his role.  I think Sonny Scott's playing on the song is unusually interesting and original, if not flashy, and wonder if it will strike any of you that way.  In the second verse, Sonny Scott pronounces hard-lucked, "hard-luck-ed".  Here is the piece:



SOLO (Spoken during solo:  Ah, Lord, have mercy on poor me!)

I can't sleep at night, baby, and the jinx does got poor me
I can't sleep at night and the, jinx does got poor me
And since my woman's been gone, then the blues won't let me be

Blues, blues, blues, don't worry my mind so long
Oh, blues, blues, blues, don't worry my mind so long
Because I'm a hard-lucked man, God, I ain't done nothin' wrong

My Mama told me, "Son, don't weep and moan."
My Mama told me, Lord, "Son, don't weep and moan.
These ugly women will be here, when you're dead and gone."

Lord, I been a dog in your family, mama, I been drove from door to door
I been a dog in your family, drove from door to door
Lordy, if my mind don't change, then I won't knock here no more

Lord, when I was a infant baby, lyin' in my Mother's arms
Ah, when I was a infant, Lord, lyin' in my Mother's arms
You know you told me, Mama, you wa'n't to going to do me no harm

I have more questions than usual about "Hard Luck Man".  Here they are:
   * What playing position/tuning did Sonny Scott use to play "Hard Luck Man"?
   * Where does he fret the fill he plays from :10--:15?
   * Where does he fret what he plays from :21--:26?
   * Where does he fret the fill he plays from :36--:43, and how does he negotiate it in the right hand?
   * How does he start his verse accompaniment from 1:05--1:06?
   * Where does he fret, and how does he play the fill from 1:40--1:49?

Please use only your ears and your guitars in figuring out your answers, and please wait until Wednesday, January 28 to post your answers so that plenty of people have a chance to listen to the track before people start posting answers.  Thanks for your participation, and I hope you enjoy the song and Sonny Scott's performance of it.

All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 08:44:27 AM by Johnm »

Offline frankie

  • Member
  • Posts: 2439
    • DoneGone.net
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #566 on: January 25, 2015, 05:12:54 PM »
Walter Roland is actually listed as the second (barely audible) guitarist on this.

Offline Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 11686
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #567 on: January 26, 2015, 07:18:34 AM »
Thanks for that information, Frank.  It makes sense.

Offline Johnm

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 11686
    • johnmillerguitar.com
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #568 on: January 28, 2015, 01:37:40 PM »
Miller's Breakdown

List continues at http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=10188.msg98102#msg98102

1. Sweet Lucy--Andrew Dunham 
2. My Rare Dog--Jaydee Short 
3. Needin' My Woman Blues--Sammy Hill 
4. Up and Down Buildin' the KC Line--Little Brother 
5.   Seven Year Itch--Otto Virgial 
6.   Going to the River, See Can I Look Across--Eddie Kirkland 
7.   Blues--Big Boy 
8.   I Love My Jelly Roll--David Edwards 
9.   My Poor Mother Keeps On Praying For Me--Wallace Chains 
10.   Blues--Eddie Bowles 
11.   Alabama Prison Blues--Jesse Wadley 
12.   Bug Juice Blues--Kid Prince Moore 
13.   Nobody Knows My Name--Unknown 
14.   What Did the Doodlebug Say to the Mole?--Gabriel Brown 
15.   Trouble--Reese Crenshaw 
16.   A and B Blues--Boy Green 
17.   Natural Man Blues--Johnny Howard 
18.   I Tried--Sylvester Cotton 
19.   Guitar Picking Song--Lucius Curtis 
20.   Tampa Blues--Skoodle Dum Doo and Sheffield 
21.   Sometimes I Wonder--Leroy Campbell and Robert Sanders 
22.   Ding Dong Ring--Unknown 
23.   Gas Ration Blues--Skoodle Dum Doo and Sheffield 
24.   I Won't Be Dogged Around--Bull City Red 
25.   West Side Blues--Willie Harris 
26.   Shanty Boat Blues--Jimmy Murphy 
27.   Wildcat Tamer--Tarheel Slim 
28.   New Root Man Blues--Georgia Slim 
29.   Tennessee Woman Blues--Johnny Shines 
30.   Alone For A Long Time--Charles Caldwell 
31.   Poor Little Angel Girl--Dennis McMillon 
32.   The Truth--Precious Bryant 
33.   Poor and Ain't Got A Dime--Floyd Council 
34.   Sun Don't Shine--Teddy Williams 
35.   I See God In Everything--E. C. Ball 
36.   Smokey Mountain Blues--Wallace Chains 
37.   French Blues--Frank Evans 
38.   Trench Blues--John Bray 
39.   Pick and Shovel Blues--Bull City Red 
40.   Station Boy Blues--Roosevelt Antrim 
41.   Baton Rouge Rag--Joe Harris 
42.   Mama, You Goin' to Quit Me?--Allison Mathis 
43.   Nobody's Business If I Do--Joe Harris 
44.   Poor Joe Breakdown--Robert Davis 
45.   Free Again--Robert Pete Williams 
46.   Dyin' Soul--Robert Pete Williams 
47.   Guitar Blues--Johnny St. Cyr 
48.   Square Dance Calls--Pete Harris
49.   Ella Speed--Wallace Chains 
50.   Country Girl Blues--George Boldwin 
51.   Fandango--Bill Tatnall 
52.   Thunder In Germany--Joel Hopkins 
53.   Old Time Rounders--Emmett Murray 
54.   Too Many Women Blues--Willie Lane 
55.   Motherless and Fatherless Blues--Charlie McCoy 
56.   Goin' Where the Monon Crosses the Yellow Dog--Scrapper Blackwell 
57.   Blues Knocking At My Door--Carolina Slim 
60.   Alabama March--J B Lenoir 
61.   Hungry Spell--Ranie Burnette 
62.   Let Me Be Your Sidetrack--Jimmie Rodgers and Clifford Gibson 
63.   Badly Mistreated Man--Carl Martin 
64.   Hoot Your Belly--Jimmy Lee Williams 
65.   Hard Luck Man--Sonny Scott 
66.   Born in Texas--Tom Shaw
67.   Muddy Shoes Blues--Jewell Long 
68.   Bulldog Blues--Luther Huff 
69.   1951 Blues--Luther Huff
70.   Home Again Blues--Frankie Lee Sims
71.   Riverside Blues--Joe Callicott
72.   This Heart of Mine--Josh White
73.   Guitar Stomp--Big Bill Broonzy
74. Eloise--Ralph Willis
75. I Lets My Daddy Do That--Hattie Hart
76. Against My Will--John Henry Barbee
77. Pickin' Low Cotton, pt. 2--Kid Prince Moore
78. Mean Conductor Blues--Roosevelt Holts
79. I Ain't Gonna Roll for the Big Hat Man No More--Joel Hopkins
80. Georgia Skin Blues--Memphis Minnie
81. Blue Shadow Falling--Buddy Moss
82. Stack O' Dollar--Arthur Weston
83. Holy Ghost Train--Rev. Robert Wilkins
84. Sleepless Nights Blues--Peetie Wheatstraw
85. Frisco Blues (Take 1)--Walter Roland & Sonny Scott
86. Fare Thee Blues, Part 1--Johnnie Head
87. Quincey Wimmens--Tallahassee Tight
88. I Been Down In the Circle Before--Sampson Pittman
89. Brown Skin Woman--Sylvester Cotton
90. Bad Luck Blues--Guitar Welch
91. Married Woman Blues--Frankie Lee Sims
92. 45 Blues--J. T. Smith
93. Kentucky Blues--George "Big Boy" Owens
94. Worried Blues--Babe Stovall
95. Hollandale Blues--Sam Chatmon
96. She's My Baby--Sam Chatmon
97. I'm A Crawling Black Snake--Lightnin' Hopkins
98. Early Morning Blues--James Lowry
99. Central Avenue Blues--Will Day
100. I Get Evil When My Love Comes Down--Gabriel Brown
101. Skippy Whippy--Mississippi Jook Band 
102. Hattie Mae--Andrew Dunham
103. Rocky Mountain--Jim Brewer
104. Kentucky Guitar Blues--J. T. Adams
105. Brown Skinned Woman--Snooks Eaglin
106. I Don't Want No Hungry Woman--Floyd Council
107. Come On Baby--Rich Trice
108. Train Blues--Lucious Curtis
109. You're Gonna Miss Me When I'm Gone--Muddy Waters
110. Red River Blues--Charlie "Dad" Nelson
111. Two Ways To Texas--Emery Glen
112. Tear It Down--Cincinnati Jug Band with Bob Coleman
113. Sing Song Blues--Bob Coleman
114. Run Here, Fairo--Myrt Holmes
115. Easy Rider--Scott Dunbar
116. Stove Pipe Stomp--Big Bill Broonzy
117. Stump Blues--Big Bill Broonzy
118. Sister Jane Cross The Hall--Kokomo Arnold
119. Death Valley Blues--Arthur Crudup
120. 180 Days--Tarheel Slim
121. 90 Going North--Frank Hovington
122. Hey Hey Mama Blues--Kid Cole
123. Whole Soul Blues--Papa Eggshell
124. Faro--Rosa Lee Hill
125. Lemon Man--Dan Pickett
126. T and T Blues--Mooch Richardson
127. Funny Caper Blues--Memphis Willie B.
128. Peakesville Boogie--Richard Wright
129. High As I Want To Be--Robert Pete Williams
130. Poor Bob's Blues--Robert Pete Williams
131. Just A Closer Walk With Thee-Rev. Robert Wilkins
132. I Will Fly Away--Pink Anderson
133. Hoppin' Toad Frog--J. T. Smith
134. Cat Squirrel--Dr. Ross
135. Pretty Polly--E. C. Ball
136. I've Been Mistreated--Georgia Slim
137. Dream Book Blues--Tommy Griffin
138. Georgia Blues--Cecil Barfield
139. Make Your Coffee--K. C. Douglas
140. I Want To Go--JB Lenoir
141. Was That The Human Thing To Do?--Bill Williams
142. My Laona Blues--Teddy Darby
143. Hard Times, Hard Times--unknown
144. Georgia Chain Gang--unknown
145. Further Down The Road--Elester Anderson
146. Pearl Harbor Blues--Roy Dunn
147. Chattanooga Blues--Lester McFarland
148. Insurance Man Blues--Washboard Walter & John Byrd
149. Jivin' Woman--Carolina Slim
150. Drove From Home Blues--Wright Holmes
151. One More Drink--Snooks Eaglin
152. Honey Bee Blues--Bumble Bee Slim
153. Guitar Pete's Blues--Pete Franklin
154. Blue Ghost Blues--Lonnie Johnson
155. Blood Red River--Eddie Hodge
156. Wolf's At Your Door--Lattie Murrell
157. Barrelhouse Blues--Ed Andrews
158. Stamp Blues--Tony Hollins
159. Rabbit Blues--Debs Mays
160. Poor Boy Blues--Willie Lofton
161. Soap Box Blues--Debs Mays
162. Black Bayou Ain't Got No Bottom--Blind Pete and partner
163. Found My Baby Crying--Lightnin' Hopkins
164. Sweet Little Woman--Doug Quattlebaum
165. I'm Going Away--Robert Curtis Smith
166. Bear Cat Blues--John Jackson
167. Pittsburgh Blues--Archie Edwards
168. Broken Heart--K. C. Douglas
169. Riley And Spencer--Fields Ward
170. You Ain't The Last Man--Elzadie Robinson & Johnny St Cyr
171. Step By Step--Lesley Riddle and Mike Seeger
172. If I Get Lucky--JB Lenoir
173. See What You Done Done--Baby Tate
174. Highway 80 Blues--Son Bonds
175. War Blues--Pernell Charity  
« Last Edit: August 27, 2016, 11:17:32 PM by Johnm »

Offline Slack

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 8882
Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #569 on: January 28, 2015, 02:03:07 PM »
Wow!  65 songs already!  Time flies. Amazing Johnm!  Maybe I can figure a way to move this message to the top of the thread.  I might also edit your post and make the songs themselves the link by using the BBC button in the BBS list above (hint hint)

 


SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2021, SimplePortal