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Muddy Waters Lyrics

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bird to whistle:
This is what I got from the "Mississippi: The Blues Lineage" recording.

I think he says "letter" throughout, but it sometimes sounds like "lil old".  He also says "now" before "babe". Also, if you compare the last word in the third line to the line "Take God to tell gal". The word God sound very similar. That's why I think it's what he is saying in the third line.

Lord I know my little old baby
she don't know I'm here.
She don't feel a God
She don't even feel no care

I be bound, I be bound to write to you.
Now babe, I can read your letter right here,
and I don't care what in the world you do.

Well I feel sometimes,
like the time ain't long.
Feel like my baby,
she gonna try to leave my home.

I be bound I be bound to write to you.
Now babe, I can read your letter right here,
And I don't care what in the world you do.

Well I know my little old baby,
She gonna jump and shout.
That old train be late boy now
and I come walking out.

I be bound, I be bound to write to you.
Now babe I can read your letter right here
and I don't care what in the world you do.

Well I'm leaving this morning,
don't you wanna go?
Take God to tell gal
when I come back here no more.

I be bound, I be bound to write you.
Now babe, I read your letter right here
I don't care what in the world you do.

Well if anybody asks you
who composed the song.
tell em Mr. Heartbreakerboy
that old man been here and gone

Woman I'm bound, I'm bound to write to you.
Now babe I read your letter right here,
and I don't care what on the world you do.

jake_fantom:
OK, lyric hounds -- this one has eluded me for years so let me ask the experts. The song is Streamline Woman, Muddy Water's version. The line that escapes me is: "Pull down your windows, baby, pull down your window blinds, so your next door neighbor won't hear your (WHAT?) whine." It is usually listed in transcriptions as "that old troubador" which is patently incorrect. On some other versions, I have seen the word listed as Frigidaire (as in the old refrigerators). This is a possibility, although Muddy seems to pronounce a word that is closer to "thrilldare," whatever that may be. This particular song is loaded with electrical metaphors, and I am wondering if the reference isn't to those bowl-shaped insulators on the old high lines, which do whine. Anyway, enough idle amateur speculation. Let's hear from the authorities.

One-Eyed Ross:
I hear "Frigidaire whine".....

jake_fantom:
Maybe so, still not sure. Thanks for weighing in!

Prof Scratchy:
Agree with one eyed Ross. That said, I used to play in a band in which the singer, unable to decipher the lyric as Muddy sings it, inserted his own 'bump and grind' to produce a single entendre version of the song!

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