Country Blues > Country Blues Licks and Lessons

Nobody Knows You When You're Down And Out

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Pan:
Hi all.

I noticed Alex's' thread on this song on the lyrics department. I've never realized that the original version was in the key of C. This of course, is very tempting for the acoustic CB guitarist. I also didn't know that the trumpet player was Louis Armstrong, so thank you for telling this Alex. You should all also note that Alex provided us with an mp3 in his thread.

I love this song and have been playing it for years so I thought I might share the chord changes, just in case some of you don't know them already.

Intro:

[| F F#dim | C/G A7 | D7 G7 | C (break) |]

Chorus:
[|: C E7 | A7 | F A7 | Dm |
                                  endings 1,2,3, and 6:
| F F#dim | C/G A7 | D7 | D7 G7 :|]

endings 4, 5 and 7 to finish:
| G7 C | D7 G7 | C (G7) :|]

Some players change from D7 to Dm7 on the ending 1, but I don't hear it on this version.

Many musicians play an descending scalar bassline from the beginning to the Dm chord as follows:
 
[|: C  E7/B | A7 A7/G | F A7/E | Dm... 

but in this key with a guitar in standard tuning you'll end up jumping an octave to the Dm, unless of course you start an octave higher to begin with. Experiment.

In the longer ending I'm hearing a Bb note being played on the last beat of the 1st bar on C chord just before moving to D7.  Is it C7 or Bb7 I'm not sure. You can live without it, as it usually is not been played on later versions.

By the way if you are not familiar with it already, check on Scrapper Blackwells absolutely fantastic version on this song. It's on the Juke.

I heard this song for the first time in the Finnish radio some 20+ years ago. I manged to put it on cassette which somebody has since lent and never returned. The radio-announcer claimed that the song was called "Nobody Loves You", and didn't gave any name for the artist. I wonder if any of you ladies or gentlemen happen to know of a piano duo or -trio version of this song (I'm sure there was a double-bass, but can't be sure about the drums) with a male voice singing. If you do, I'd be extremely pleased to know, because I've been looking for it ever since.

Come to think of it, if you know of ANY good versions of this song, why don't you share it? I like to listen to as many versions as possible, of my favorite songs. A postwar jazzy version with Jimmy Witherspoon on vocals and Ben Webster on tenor sax is very nice in my opinion.

GhostRider:
Pan:

Thanks for this.

One question: how do you finger the F#dim?

BTW, here's the link to the original thread in the Lyrics section, where the .mp3 can be found.

http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?amp;Itemid=83&topic=669.0

Alex

Pan:
Hi Alex

Thanks for the link, it was beyond my technical abilities.

As for the F#dim you could try: 2-x-1-2-1-x, or F#-Eb-A-C, fingered: 2nd for F#, barr?ed 1st fing4er, 3rd for A,and the barr?ed 1st finger again for the high C.

If you wish, you could of course also add the high F# on 2nd fret on the 1st string with your little finger.

Pan

Pan:
Hi again

Something just came into my mind.

If you prefer to voice the F chord with your thumb on the bass, you might want to do the same with F#dim7, doubling the low F# an octave higher: 2-x-4-2-1-x, fingered :Thumb, 4th, 2nd and 1st finger.

In my previous suggestion you also have the possibility to add the D note on the 2nd string, if you want some inner movement within the chord (this comes from the fact that F#dim7 is also D7b9/F# and of course you can add the root).

Pan

Bunker Hill:

--- Quote from: Pan on January 16, 2006, 07:03:29 AM ---I heard this song for the first time in the Finnish radio some 20+ years ago. I manged to put it on cassette which somebody has since lent and never returned. The radio-announcer claimed that the song was called "Nobody Loves You", and didn't gave any name for the artist. I wonder if any of you ladies or gentlemen happen to know of a piano duo or -trio version of this song (I'm sure there was a double-bass, but can't be sure about the drums) with a male voice singing. If you do, I'd be extremely pleased to know, because I've been looking for it ever since.
--- End quote ---
Yeah, the great, and today much underrated, Cecil Gant. Nobody Loves You (When You?re   Down and Out), recorded for Dot in about 1947 I think. He's playing the piano and accompanied by unidentified drummer.

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