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Jim Jackson Lyrics

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Johnm:
Thanks very much for that info, dj.  I think the pianist on the track would be next to impossible to identify on the basis of his sound, since he's virtually inaudible.  I'd recognize that "unknown" anywhere, though.
All best,
Johnm

uncle bud:
I'm no piano expert, but I do have a fondness for Speckled Red's playing, and what little is audible from the piano doesn't sound like Red at all to me. I also think he would have never been able to exercise that much restraint.

Johnm:
Hi all,
Jim Jackson recorded "My Monday Woman Blues" in 1927.  It is an 8-bar blues in E position, standard tuning, and must be one of the very earliest of its type to be recorded.  Jim Jackson's guitar playing is really fine on it, with tremendous heavy time.  Was this the earliest song with a woman for every day of the week?  I know Long Cleve Reed and Papa Harvey Hull recorded "Gang of Brownskin Women" and Cripple Clarence Lofton and Pink Anderson had versions much later. 
For his fifth verse, Jackson goes to a 12-bar form opening with an 8-bar lyric break.  It's almost as though "Rabbit" Brown was singing a response to the opening line of Jim Jackson's final verse when Brown sang "James Alley Blues".  Jackson had a way of closing his mouth emphatically when singing the word "I" sometimes so that it ended up sounding like "I'm".  I seem to remember Booker White doing this also.  You can hear Jim Jackson's rendition of the song at http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=2101.msg71960#msg71960.



My Monday girl, she works twenty-two off Main
But my Tuesday brownskin brings me pocket change

My Wednesday girl love whiskey, sometime she do drink beer
But my Thursday woman give me the devil if she catch me here

My Friday good girl, she reads me the daily news
But my Saturday highbrown buys my socks and shoes

My Sunday woman, she lays on my right arm and sleep
You can know from that, I got a woman for every day in the week

I got a gal in Georgia, one in Lou'siana
Four in Chattanooga, six in Alabama
Four, five women right here in Memphis, Tennessee
If you don't like my peaches, let my orchard be

I wish I was a jaybird in the air
I'd build my nest in some of you highbrowns' hair

I'm just from the country, you know I'm easy to rule
You can hitch me to your cart, girl, and drive me for your mule

All best,
Johnm

Johnm:
Hi all,
"Bootlegging Blues" is, for the most part, another 8-bar blues played out of E position in standard tuning by Jim Jackson.  The exception is a one-chord refrain that Jackson inserts from time to time over the course of his rendition.  It's a neat feature, since it is phrased differently than are the 8-bar verses.  The song has interesting lyrics; like some of the Old-Time anti-Prohibition songs, it disapproves of Prohibition because of the greater danger involved in drinking the illegally made hooch than in drinking legal, regulated spirits.  This is all assuming one can stop drinking whenever one cares to, of course.  The song has a great slow-rocking groove. 



Since corn liquor came in style, that's plenty money to be made
Just get a job at one of these stills and you surely will be paid

I'll tell you, it's a mighty risk to run and a mighty chance to take
To spend your money for the corn that the bootleggers make

REFRAIN: The bootleggin' man got his bottle in his hand
And all he needs is a little more speed
So he can out-run the Revenue man

When the bootlegger goes to his still, get ready to make his stuff
He's got his concentrated lye, cocaine and his snuff (Spoken: He'll fix you up a drink, just won't quit!)

It'll make you fight a circle saw
Make you slap the ladies down
And make you pick a fight with your Pa

REFRAIN: The bootleggin' man got his bottle in his hand
And all he needs is a little more speed
So he can out-run the Revenue man

I went home the other night, I swore I wouldn't drink no more
Until saloons come back with bottled in bond and the days of long ago

But I see that will never be, so I just got drunk again
I haven't nothin', as long as corn liquor lasts 'til I got no money to spend

REFRAIN: The bootleggin' man got his bottle in his hand
And all he needs is a little more speed
So he can out-run the Revenue man

SOLO

REFRAIN: The bootleggin' man got his bottle in his hand
And all he needs is a little more speed
So he can out-run the Revenue man

All best,
Johnm

 

GhostRider:
John:

Re: My Monday Woman Blues. I have this tune (by Jim Jackson) on a British compilation and it has a number of different verses, two of which are bridge-like verses with slightly differing chords.

Alex

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