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Cain killed Abel, but I wasn't going to let that cane kill me - Emmett Murray, on quitting his job in the sugar cane fields, notes to Drop On Down in Florida

Author Topic: Miller's Breakdown  (Read 158611 times)

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Offline Forgetful Jones

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2310 on: August 18, 2021, 02:30:24 PM »
Quick answers without my guitar handy (and not a ton of time to examine the specific questions).

Frankie Lee Sims I believe is in Drop D tuning. I couldn't really hear the low D note until the end of the song, when I think it's audible during the start of the outro.

Manny Nichols I believe is in standard tuning E position.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2311 on: August 24, 2021, 08:35:38 AM »
Hi all,
The Frankie Lee Sims and Manny Nichols puzzlers have been up for a while with no new responses so I'll post the answers.

For Frankie Lee Sims' "Cross Country Blues":
   * His playing position was D in dropped-D tuning, as I think everyone had it. Well done!
   * Frankie Lee started the descending run from 1:48--1:51 on the + of beat one of a measure. On the + of that beat one he played a bent fifth fret of the second string. On beat two he played a triplet, going from, I believe, the unbent fifth fret of the second string to the third fret of the second string and from there to the first fret of the second string. On beat three he played another triplet, walking down the third string chromatically, second fret to first fret to open third string. On beat four he played a final triplet, going from the third fret of the fourth string up to the open third string and back again, concluding the run on the downbeat of the next measure with the open fourth string.
   * He began his solo utilizing the "three frets up" idea, as everybody had it.

This is an unusually loose-sounding take from Frankie Lee. I always love his singing and playing, but a couple of times on this one, it almost sounds like the wheels were going to come off, especially in the solo. What a great singer!

For Manny Nichols' "Walking Talking Blues":
   * His playing position was E in standard tuning, as everyone had it.
   * He opened his solo on a IV chord, A, with a big slide into the seventh fret of the fourth string and the sixth fret of the third string, going from there to a unison of the fifth fret of the second string and the open first string. Mark C had this spot on, as did Dave.
   * For his V chord, he liked to walk up the fifth string chromatically from the open fifth string to the second fret and then explode into the upper four strings, simply fretting the first fret of the fourth string, and leaving the first three strings open. A lot of players liked to leave the first string open in a B7 chord in an E blues--Manny Nichols is one of the few I've heard who also liked to leave the third string open. It makes the V chord sound augmented, with that open G string in there, which is the #V of B. It's also kind of Flamencoey-sounding.

Boy, did Manny Nichols play hard from the picking hand and get a big sound! His thumb-struck notes sound like a drum.

Thanks to all who participated and I hope you enjoyed the songs. I'll look for some more.
All best,
Johnm
« Last Edit: August 24, 2021, 03:06:38 PM by Johnm »

Offline MarkC

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2312 on: August 24, 2021, 02:46:51 PM »
Thanks for doing these breakdowns John. I always learn something interesting I try to keep in my toolbox.

Offline Johnm

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Re: Miller's Breakdown
« Reply #2313 on: August 24, 2021, 03:11:14 PM »
Well thanks for participating, Mark. It's the folks who participate who really make this thread go, from my point of view. I appreciate that engagement with the performances, and I've noted that the folks who participate regularly are pretty routinely right about playing position/tuning on the songs, which is by far the most important thing to be able to identify, I think. If you get that right, answering any of the other questions is pretty much just a matter of hanging in there and trying things until you've got it.
All best,
Johnm

 


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