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Author Topic: 508park - ARC Recording and Robert Johnson related Exhibit to Open in Dallas  (Read 1056 times)

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Offline Shovel

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I don't know how many people are aware of the Robert Johnson-related 508 Park project that's slated to open later in 2013 in Dallas.  508 Park Ave Dallas TX is the address of the building where Robert Johnson recorded his 2nd session.  The building was in the news a few years back when Eric Clapton recorded some tracks there for his album Me and Mr. Johnson.   And while Robert Johnson is certainly a focus of the project, there was a lot of other music recorded at this site that will be featured.

Alan Govenar, someone many Weenies are probably aware of through his work on Texas Music and related, is on the Committee directing the project.  Elijah Wald, someone else attended one of their events last year and can be seen discussing RJ's work there in the 2nd link below:

Here's a link to their their main site: http://508park.org

Here's their youtube page with a few more videos related to the project: http://www.youtube.com/user/508ParkAvenue?feature=watch

Don't know how many folks on here are aware of or maybe even involved with the project.  Definitely worth checking out if you're in the area!
« Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 06:10:00 AM by Shovel »

Offline Shovel

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June 29th Sneak Preview tour as described in bold near bottom

                   E X H I B I T     A N N O U N C E M E N T

The Fine Arts Division of the Dallas Public Library is pleased to host 508 Park: The Past Meets the Future, an exhibit and event celebrating the ?resurrection? of the 1930 Art Deco building at 508 Park Avenue in Downtown Dallas. The structure, which was almost lost to posterity, has played a significant role in the city?s cultural history.
In recent years, 508 Park has become famous as one of the only two locations where Bluesman Robert Johnson (1911-38) recorded. Johnson recorded only twenty-nine songs in his brief career, in 1936 and ?37. That small repertoire, however, was powerfully influential, shaping the future work of such major pop, rock, and blues stars as the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, the Allman Brothers, and Led Zeppelin.  In recognition of the site?s heritage, it was here that in 2004 Eric Clapton recorded parts of the DVD Sessions for Robert J.
However, 508 Park?s storied past goes well beyond its connection to Robert Johnson. It served as the local offices and/or distribution warehouse for divisions of the American Record Corporation and Warner Brothers Film Exchange. Available space sometimes doubled as a makeshift recording studio, not only for Johnson, but for other groundbreaking performers such as Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys, the Stamps Quartet, W. Lee O'Daniel and his Hillbilly Boys, the Crystal Springs Ramblers, and the Light Crust Doughboys.
After years of intense local interest in the building, The Stewpot of First Presbyterian Church of Dallas bought the site in June 2011. Their plans to preserve and reopen the building  moving their ?Open Art Studio? there and creating a Museum of Street Culture to be curated by Alan Govenar, have stirred a great deal of excitement among local music lovers.
508 Park: The Past Meets the Future allows the public a ?sneak peek? at what they can expect to see in the museum when the building is reopened.  On Saturday, June 29, Alan Govenar, Pat Bywaters, and Carol Adams, the trio at the center of researching the building?s history and envisioning the Museum, will present an overview of that  history, including some of the music that was recorded here. They will also provide a ?preview of coming attractions,? highlighting plans for the building and the work in progress.
Following the presentation, the Friends of the Dallas Public Library will host a ?musical reception,? giving guests the opportunity to talk with our guest speakers while hearing music from artists who recorded at 508 Park Avenue.
The program begins at 2:00 p.m., on the 4th floor of the J. Erik Jonsson Central Library (1515 Young Street). The exhibit will be open June through December. For more information, please call the Fine Arts Division: 214-670-1643.




« Last Edit: June 17, 2013, 04:10:10 PM by Shovel »

Offline wreid75

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Robert Johnson I believe is both a blessing and a curse for country blues.  Without him many of us may never have gotten into this kind of music (me specifically) since he introduced the music to so many but a curse in the fact that 90% or more of all media generated about country blues is about only one person.  And 50% of that is simply not true.  That said I see a trip to Dallas in my future.

Offline Shovel

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  • Posts: 160
Robert Johnson I believe is both a blessing and a curse for country blues.  Without him many of us may never have gotten into this kind of music (me specifically) since he introduced the music to so many but a curse in the fact that 90% or more of all media generated about country blues is about only one person.  And 50% of that is simply not true.  That said I see a trip to Dallas in my future.

I agree 100%.  From what I've seen, they are using his name as the hook that it is but the museum will be focused on a lot of other aspects of what took place there, as well as street culture in general, even an exhibit on hobo nickels which I hadn't heard of prior to reading about this project.

I've been to the Robert Johnson museum in (Crystal Springs?) Mississippi and met Robert's Grandson Steven there but I haven't visited the MS Blues Trail yet.  Hope to get there soon, my last time through there was a family trip, not blues/music focused.

Offline oddenda

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I feel that R. Johnson is a curse leavened by White folks buying into a mythology that he did not create. His music was interesting, granted, but to focus on it as has been gone since A. Lomax and J. Hammond is akin to writing about the US automobile industry and focus on the Edsel*. Both were failures in their original intended marketplace.

pbl

*in the Uk, the Metropolitan; in Oz, the P76 Leyland.

 


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